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5

There's a few things that can affect the ability to do squats correctly, and it is a surprisingly hard lift to do. Take heart, all the issues are correctable. They range from: Flexibility issues--hip, hamstrings, glutes, and calf muscles can all limit range of motion Skeletal structure issues--if your stance is too wide you will be fighting your skeleton ...


4

Untrained muscles are not conditioned to doing hard work. It's really that simple. The more hard work you do, the more conditioned your musculature and supporting systems are to doing hard work. People who have physical jobs have muscles that are trained to do their jobs. If that involves carrying heavy objects from one place to another, digging, ...


4

First I would sugget an evaluation by a physical therapist. They can take a look at your alignment and do a running analysis to see why you have such a muscle imbalance. Sometimes stretching a tight muscle can help, but sometimes it takes looking at the alignment of the foot, ankle, knee, hip, pelvis and low back to strengthen weak muscles and stretch ...


4

No danger for the muscles, joints or ligaments really. If you are used to walking and spend several hours taking a walk outside with a friend will that be bad for your body? Doing a lot of push-ups will just develop endurance, if that's what you want then go for it. Last time I checked the world record for non-stop push-ups was 10,507 and was set by Minoru ...


3

Finger injuries from climbing often involve strains of the tendon and/or tendon pulley, inflamation, partial or full tears and/or joint ligament sprains. You would need to see a doctor for a diagnosis, preferably a hand specialist with experience treating climbers. If you need treatment, look for a specialized hand therapist (either a physical or ...


3

It's not so much support for the tendons. One of the theories behind it is that it helps lift the skin away from the structures underneath it (microscopically) which allows a little more room for swelling, which in turn helps minimize pain. A second theory is that it acts much like rubbing an area does, which interrupts the pain signal to the brain. It is ...


2

General Strategies for Tendonitis The real general advice is something you probably already know. Listen to your body, and if something hurts, quit doing it. If it hurts when you're not active, take a few days off. And if it continues to hurt after a week or more of rest, go see a doctor and physical therapist. Advice for gym climbing It sounds like ...


2

What my new therapist uses to prescribe in order to help healing not very severe tendon problems is slow eccentric exercises, aka negative phases, with very light weights, two or three sets, three times a day, everyday. Now, I think that you don't need to be a rocket scientist to understand that, whatever is useful to heal and strengthen an injured tendon, ...


2

Sets are primarily a method of controlling volume. More volume means more training stimulus, which means a harder but hopefully more fruitful recovery period. I don't know of any relevance the total volume has to tendon health. A moderate weight done for 8 to 12 reps in a slow, controlled fashion is the important part for tendon health. I would increase the ...


2

Keeping your rep range between 8-12 will allow you muscles to reach hypertrophy (You can Google for many studies around this) and as soon as you can lift 12 you increase with the smallest amount possible. Always lift to positive failure and you will have tendons adjust to your new weights in no time. What is supposed to and what have been actually studied ...


2

It sounds like you may have sprained your TFCC. It is one of the most common wrist injuries when it comes to weight training, especially after doing lots and lots of pull-ups or push-ups. As a sports physical therapist, I would first recommend you to take away all painful activities, yes this includes the punching and doing pull-ups. Next, you should ...


2

Ligaments are passive rubber bands. They are not muscles or tendons that you can voluntarily contract and release and so you cannot strengthen them through exercise. They are also very poorly vascularized and take a very long time to "heal" which is why when you tear one, the surgeon can't just "sew it back together" but has to replace it with a ligament ...


2

The only preparatory work that somebody might want to do before starting a beginner strength training program is gaining the necessary flexibility and awareness needed for maintaining form on some exercises. Areas that in some people require a bit of preparatory work are: Shoulder flexibility for overhead work or bar positioning during the back squat ...


2

You might find this post in T-nation very interesting. A summary: a study with runners suffering from an Achilles tendon injury, healed very well by performing eccentric exercises, aka negative phases. Eccentric exercises seem to be very useful for healing tendonitis, in several studies. More details in this answer Additionally, you may find useful to ...


1

The vastus medialis is made up of two parts. It has a long part called the VML - vastus medialis longus And it has a more distal part closer to the knee which you appear to be describing called the VMO - vastus medialis obliquus. (Whether or not they are actually one muscle or separate is not fully known.) This VMO video explains why the muscle may not ...


1

When you are training, your whole body adapts to the stress you put on it. The speed, how different structures of your body adapt, differs. Muscles and tendons will adapt faster than joints and bones. Under normal conditions you don't need to explicitly train your tendons – and I doubt it is possible at all – they will develop as your muscles grow, and so ...


1

Tendons and ligaments can be strengthened by doing some stretching. It is better that you do some stretching before you start any exercise. Below is an article that teaches how to stretch some of your tendons: How to Rebuild & Strengthen Tendons You said that you feel sharp pain in your wrist? I have the same problem as you a month back until my friend ...


1

I was diagnosed w/ posterior tibial tendonopathy by physician at running clinic at major university. He sent me to their PT to learn how to tape the ankle. For 3 mos, I applied tape as directed and did the core strengthening exercises that he prescribed, as well as ran in place learning to acquire a new running technique in which I would strike mid-foot ...


1

Your workout frequency suggests overtraining. Particularly since you'll be gripping weights for almost any kind of exercise, your forearms really aren't getting a break. If you're doing wrist curls, it'll exacerbate it that much more. Having at minimum one rest day between workouts is pretty essential, regardless of what you're doing . Unless you're using ...


1

I believe shorter muscle bellies fatigue faster and have greater explosive potential. To get a full contraction on a short muscle belly, actin and myosin filaments have to attach, detatch, and reattach fewer times hence my belief that it would have greater explosive potential.


1

I would definitely go to a sports doctor esp. since it's better to catch this while you're young and regenerate faster than when you're older. I had this piercing pain on my left knee when it wasn't moving. It usually happened while I was driving; I guess the certain angle I had it at in the car aggravated it. I went to a sports doc who did an X-ray and I ...


1

I don't know the underlying physiology of the issue, but I had the same problem: ankle dorsiflexion inflexibility. What worked for me was more squatting: heavy barbell squats 3 times a week, frequent squatting (heels as close to the ground as possible) throughout the day for common tasks, and working on improving the amount of time I could spend in my ...



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