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9

Here's how I do do it (I have a fitbit one). When I'm doing an activity that I think the fitbit won't track properly (biking, or a sport), I switch to recording/sleep mode (they're the same). I only do this so that I can remember how long that activity took. Then, using the web interface later, I enter the actual activity, time, and duration (using info ...


5

The challenge of measuring "fitness" is that is a vague concept. If you want to take specific measurements, you need specific goals. As an example of vague to specific: I want to get in shape. I want to lose weight. I want to lose 20 lbs. I want to lose 20 lbs. by my 25th high school reunion. I want to lose 20 lbs and fit into 30" waist pants by my 25th ...


5

Tracking your waist measurements will give you some of the most important information about your health gains as you get back in shape. Your goal is for your waist to measure about one half of your height. Central obesity is a big factor in many health problems so your waist measurement and waist ratios are a key measurement. Tracking your body fat ...


5

Ok, as fredob requested, this is an n=1 style of writeup, for my experiences and what I consider to be the core kernels of a lifetime fitness program. Note, this is not a design for specific competition, this is fitness in general. Obviously if you compete, you would need to tweak the physical component and nutrition components to support that. NUTRITION ...


5

Check out the book "Practical Programming for Strength Training" by Rippetoe and Kilgore. It is aimed at the college educated professional strength coach and covers every aspect of developing training programs. While overly detailed for the likes of us, it is the basis for lifetime learning. BTW I'm over 60 and started lifting in my teens. I've always put my ...


5

The "notebook & pen" is great from a "in use" perspective. As John says, the notebook or - as I prefer - index cards do better in the gym than smartphone/tablets. Both for the training program itself and for taking notes on weights, reps and effort. However, for the other perspective, when you capture the context (sleep, food, subjective info) and want ...


4

Lifting heavy weights. Everything else you might do depends on strength, so if you don't have that, you'll be limited. If you do have it, everything will improve for you. You'll be more flexible, have better endurance, will be less injury prone and will recover from injuries faster. It's also very sustainable. You can do one short, high intensity lifting ...


4

You are interpreting too much into too little data. You will always have daily peaks with no apparent reason, this depends on how well you digest, how much you drink (and let go) etc. I weighed myself over the past year - sometimes more than once daily - and as you can see only the long term curve really is interesting. Note the peak around the holidays ...


4

Tracking information is always a pain, because there really aren't any good apps for during, as you always have to be interrupting your workout to enter your weights, reps, etc. What I ended up doing was tracking food and sleep along with workouts in just a regular notebook or datebook, and then adding notes about how I felt if I had a particularly good or ...


4

I doubt that there is any such website as there is no profit for these companies in sharing their data with such an aggregator. Although some sites work in cooperation with other sites, eg Fitocracy can pull your running data from Runkeeper and Runtastic does similar stuff, I don't know of a public API to access the data. Even if it were possible to pull ...


4

Take a look at the Galloway Run-Walk program. The harsh reality is that in a week, if you can only run 4k continuously right now, you will not be able to run 10k in a week. Your best bet if you really want to do it, is some sort of the above, where you run 1k, walk .5k, etc. Get used to the idea that you WILL be walking if you go ahead and do the 10k. If ...


3

There's some good discussion of this in John Walker's book The Hacker's Diet. Here's a quote from a chapter called "The Rubber Bag". Consider this view of human as rubber bag presented at a NASA conference on the exploration of Mars. From this all-inclusive perspective, which accounts for the oxygen in the air we breathe, moisture lost ...


3

Lots of hardware out there, usually in watch format with wirelessly connected remote devices. You get the main watch with time, alarms, stopwatch, often computer download modes. Then the accessories. Heart Rate Monitors almost all use chest straps, (lick/wet the strap to get it to work at first, once you start sweating you will be fine, but when you first ...


3

As per JohnP's answer, looking at individual GPS logs in isolation is of limited use: if you're trying to track improvements then so many other factors (fatigue, weather, stress, etc) can make it look as though you performed 'better' in one session than another. Garmin's interface isn't very helpful at examining this because (mostly) it presents each run in ...


3

The problem with GPS and heart rate and all the data that the little gizmo's give you is that they are short term metrics, that are generally only applicable to that day and point in time. Yet everyone wants to use them to change the way they train tomorrow, and it doesn't work like that. Take your heart rate. Today you go out and you run a 6 mile out and ...


3

I find it useful to track things I want to improve. So, when I want to do the workouts my coach set me in a programme then I track that. If I want to get my body fat or mass down then I track that. There's no point tracking something just to track it. So, figure out what you want to improve.


3

One of the founders wrote in the comments on this page (as of April 17, 2014): Re: finding Courses. We are planning to add this functionality. For now, the best way to do this is by navigating to the City page for the area you are searching (Home menu/My City). Once on the city page there is a tab on the map that can be changed from routes to Courses. ...


2

Are you specifically looking for software to run on an Android? If not, the handy-dandy notebook never fails. Instead of spending all your time filling out data, though, I'd suggest picking one day a week to dedicate to making data entries. There are too many fluctuations from day-to-day for daily measurements. Also, I've found that taking daily ...


2

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/ has some great tools. Your diet is probably as important as anything, so start there. It also has tracking of exercises by calories burned, and you can save your measurements and update them daily/weekly. Like, how many inches around your neck or waist is. I can link to mine if you want to check it out. Fitbit would only really ...


2

I would check out the Polar line of Heart Rate monitors. They have been in the business for longer than most. There are several higher end models with computer interfaces that can download data. Failing that, many of the new running watches that have GPS allow computer connections to download and some of them now come with HRM straps, so I imagine it ...


2

In general, the body adapts to new stress loads (i.e. workouts) at a rate of approximately 50% per week. So, after 4 weeks, your body will be approximately 95% adapted to the new workload. By "adapt" I mean build muscle tissue, increase capillary density, more efficiently generate ATP, etc. If you start a new workload, they progression of adaptation over 4 ...


2

The galaxy gear actually links to your phone and can't do much without it (certainly not GPS), so it's not going to solve your problem with carrying your phone around. I believe the MIO alpha strapless monitor might be the sort of thing you are looking for ... there a review of it here. But that still won't give you GPS. GPS watches are rather pricey and ...


2

There are quite a few heart rate monitor fitness trackers coming soon to the market. I'm sure many of us (including me) are anxiously awaiting something that can accurately measure calorie expenditure, rather than relying on a pedometer. Obviously, nobody wants to have to inconveniently strap a heart rate monitor around their chest. Here are some options ...


1

You can use an Excel file; this way, you can add as many columns as you prefer and as many rows as you want as well. It's portable and you can open it on most platforms.


1

I am of the opinion that keeping minimal information is best. I track which exercises I did, and that's about it. I might add a few words of comment if it's really meaningful, but really it's just to track numbers and tonnage.


1

The "how" is briefly explained in the instructions from page 14 onwards. In essence: Weight is measured; height is entered; BMI is calculated from those; body fat and water percentages, muscle and bone mass are calculated using a tiny electric current; I would guess the metabolic rates are based on average levels using all of the above plus the user's ...


1

In general, most portions are about the size of a deck of cards, or a closed fist. 1 portion of meat is roughly 20g of protein 1 portion of starches (potatoes, etc.) is roughly 20g of carbs The tough thing is to estimate the amount of fat in things, which can easily sneak up on you. Deep fried potatoes (all variations of fries) contain lots of fat. ...


1

With free alternatives, you aren't going to come across too many that can rival a Nike premium app. In reality, you would probably need to use a combination of one or more different apps to do so. If you wanted randomly generated circuit training or workout routines, try: sworkit.com. It randomly generates workouts based off of your desired program level, ...


1

Until my MOTOACTV I used a Garmin Forerunner 305; loved it, despite it being the size of my head. I've been pretty happy with the MOTOACTV, plus it plays music. I just use my old Garmin chest monitor; I didn't buy anything new. It also connects via BT to my phone, which is convenient on occasion. And it can do BT audio. IMO their website is a little lacking ...


1

Probably the most accurate way to get a good estimate of how many calories you have burned is by using a heart rate monitor. If you decide to go this route, get the kind with the belt or armband. The band monitors the heart rate and sends a signal to the wristwatch, and the wristwatch has the computer that will analyze all the data. Most decent HRM will ...



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