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47

Evidence shows that more than 5 days a week training increases your risk of musculoskeletal injury. Rest is physically necessary so that the muscles can repair, rebuild and strengthen -- continuous training can actually weaken it. Without sufficient time to repair, the body will continue to breakdown from intensive exercise. Overtraining often occurs from ...


20

I assume your workout consist of weightlifting or other strength training. This mostly consist of short, high intensity exercises, which are likely mostly done anaerobic. Running before this workout, means your body is warmed up, the activity of your cardiovascular and pulmonary systems are increased and your body has started to make sure you have enough ...


15

Without rest, you will build muscle mass quicker than your supporting organs can build and adjust to enable their proper use. At that point, you will hit a plateau which you will be unable to cross. However, this does not hold true for aerobic exercise, where the Mayo Clinic suggests 30 minutes daily. This is more for muscle building and strength training.


12

This is absolutely a good approach. You get to build up some muscle, and you don't damage your metabolism the way you would with severe calorie restriction. I think it is worth doing a little myth-busting. A pound of muscle will burn more calories per day, but only about 6 more calories and you'll likely eat a little more to compensate. However, the ...


12

Here are some of the things I worked on when I tried to get into parkour in college. These are some foundations that you can start with. Roll on the ground. This is a move that will help carry you forward and get you back on your feet. It also helps to absorb and lessen the impact on your body (and risk of injury) when hitting the ground. Start from a ...


12

I cannot provide a link to an official analysis of the training/instruction program of an elite military facility. What I can do is tell you of my own personal experience with it. You mentioned the lack of regeneration and rest, and you are absolutely right. The idea behind the selection process is to completely maim you psychologically and put you to the ...


12

The end of February is twenty weeks away. With that much time until the competition, you should periodize your training into a general preparation, specific training, and competition lead-up. Doing just push-ups might work too, but you will achieve better results with a more balanced approach. General preparation - 6 weeks For the general preparation ...


11

This Scientific American article may help. It basically states that the improvements in cardio-respiratory function from exercise are due to the efficiency of the cardiac component rather than lung function: Improvement in cardio-respiratory function does not result from changes in the lung's ability to expand, however. In general regular exercise does ...


10

Using machines is vastly different than free weights for a number of reasons: Machines typically move the weight over a fixed path. Free weights require you to balance the weight yourself. This means the same exercise with free weights engages more muscles, but even more importantly, it allows you to develop neuro-muscular coordination. This coordination ...


10

2 weeks is not a lot of time to 'train' - based on the need to give your body a rest. Typically you want to plan a 10-12 week cycle of training prior to any event....given this is 'carrying furniture out' and not a major league event I would focus on technique more than anything else since the time needed to build strength or stamina is not available. I ...


10

There's nothing wrong with consuming protein before or during your workout. Some studies suggest that this may lead to enhanced results. Here's one example. Other studies, such as this one, claim that this is not the case, though, and that while your body responds differently to exercise when you load up on proteins before the workout, this difference does ...


10

The short answer to your question, “What is different in my body from a year ago?" Just about everything! More mitochondria? - Yes, esp. if your training includes aerobic or endurance exercise. According to Dudley's research, "an increase in the intensity of training brings about the greatest adaptive response in the mitochondria." Are they more ...


10

Start at your head, and go to your feet. That's the muscles involved. :p Seriously, a good punch will involve most of the muscles in the body. The primary single movers in a punch are going to be Pecs (Chest) Triceps (Arm) Deltoids (Shoulder) You could throw a punch just using those muscles, but it won't be a hugely powerful punch (Think a jab in ...


10

Optimal Jump Training Without Restrictions "Arioch" recommends squats, plyometrics, and speed work with submaximal weights to improve jumping height: An athlete wishing to improve his vertical jump should not only squat, but perform a variety of assistance work specific to both improving squatting strength as well as specifically improving jumping ...


9

Safety first, if you want to learn to swim (as an adult), make sure you try it in a swimming pool where you can easily stand up if things go wrong and have supervision around in case of an emergency. As someone who has learned several children to swim, I'd say its pretty hard to learn it yourself properly. Why? Because you can read the words, but that ...


9

The answer to "what should a beginner do to physically prepare for X activity" doesn't change very much whether you're training for chainsaw-wielding, tennis, or martial arts: first get strong while doing your chosen activity, then add power and slightly sport-specific tasks, and add conditioning if your sport doesn't do enough to tire you out. If you're ...


9

I've asked this implicitly of two qualified personal trainers. (One of the two usually trains Olympic athletes, so I trust his judgement.) Each time I said that I was interested in weight training to balance out the extra workout that my quads get (not just in the lower body, but to bring up my upper body strength too). Both of them said it was a reasonable ...


9

At the novice stages, all activities can improve general fitness. As one progresses, however, all attributes improve in more activity-specific ways. This is less true of attributes like strength and more true of attributes like cardio. We have a general cardiovascular capability, which can be measured by activities we are not accustomed to or by VO2MAX. But ...


9

Any training can cause injury I am wary of bodyweight training just as much as I am wary of barbell training. Both have their risks, including tendonitis, shoulder trouble, and back problems. Overtraining is an issue under any overzealous progression. What you are looking for is not marked by any particular tool, but by cautious progression. Workout ...


8

Basically, 50% is the transition point between resting and the first zone and every next zone is a 10% increase. Your max is 90%+. Here's the chart: Note: Image is from the wikimedia commons and released under CC-SA But look at the charts as an approximate baseline average for most people they also don't paint a very realistic picture. Your VO2 MAX will ...


8

The article you site refers to the Bulgarian method, which produces world class lifters who can handle the high intensity, constant training, and become very strong because of it. But propenents tend to not mention all of the people who are spit out the back of the Bulgarian system because their bodies can not handle the strain. It is the people that can ...


8

Sorry to disappoint you, but having lots of time is not necessary at all for getting your body in top shape, and it won't contribute to your gains. For better or worse, the program I recommend (based on current scientific research) simply doesn't take very long: Strength training with standard compound exercises, which are bench press, squat, deadlift and ...


8

First - I'd recommend just forgetting training for one-arm pushups and probably even nix the diamond pushups. You need to work on the primary movement first, then expand to variations. Next, if you really want to increase the number of consecutive pushups you can do, I'd suggest doing them more frequently - maybe every other day. A few extra sets of pushups ...


8

If i got your question right, you can't do a single push-up and you want to change that. There are several ways to make "easier" push-ups. You can try to: do them on your knees standing/leaning against a wall with your hands in a higher position, on a chair or sth. If you just want to be able to do push-ups, i think you can start by doing some of these ...


8

How to know Well, since our friends looking at the problem in a very "sports science way" I will rephrase and add more details (which may not be as practical as you think. Please refer to an expirienced trainer to be the judge of the symptoms below (Self judgments can be too soft and over sensitive sometimes)) "Overtraining" might be to blame if your ...


7

The two programs that are best suited for beginners are Starting Strength and StrongLifts. See this article for some more information to help choose the program. Starting Strength was put together by Mark Rippetoe who is a strength training coach since the 70s. I highly recommend his book whether you use his program or not. It is some good, no-nonsense ...


7

The main factor holding one back is the fear response. Our bodies are trying to keep us safe so we should listen. This article describes the effect you speak of: Under acute stress, the body's sympathetic nervous system prepares the body for sustained, vigorous action. The adrenal gland dumps cortisol and adrenaline into the blood stream. Blood pressure ...


7

Really, the only equipment you need to gain strength is some floor space and something to hang on. And even the "something to hang on" is, in some people's opinion, optional. If you can't afford, or don't want to, spend the money on typical gym equipment, then look into the various bodyweight exercises and plans. Convict Conditioning, Never Gymless, You Are ...


7

Well I'd recommend you to cycle the way you feel most comfortable with. I would recommend you to cycle at an average pace to work and decide daily how you want to cycle back. Maybe you need to relieve some stress or aggression, so just bite your handlebar and go full speed. Maybe you are exhausted already anyway, so just keep it slow. Cycling 18km daily ...



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