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I'm super surprised no one has mentioned the major source of muscle imbalance in climbers: climbing is a pulling sport more than a pushing sport. This results in overdevelopment of upper-body pulling muscles (biceps and back) relative to pushing muscles (chest and triceps). I personally have a friend who climbs 5.14 and yet has terrible back pain that ...


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The best thing I could think of would be to try to regulate your routine by adding in bodyweight exercises when you can at home. If you shower in the morning, do them when you wake up if you can't make it to the gym that day; if at night, do them before dinner. While getting to a gym can be time consuming, these types of exercises can be constant, and help ...


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When you train for high resistance, your body will gain a mind-muscle connection to the specific movement. If you don't train that particular movement for a long period of time, those motor neurons used to fire those muscles will not be as strong as they were before.


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I've picked up this as it was mentioned on another SE site. I don't think this is true. I do not think that climbers suffer from muscle imbalances, in fact this type of imbalance would be very detrimental to climbing ability. Almost every climber I know has better posture than the average person. Most climbers work hard on posture, it's very important as ...


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I'm going to tackle the issues of creatine timing, general eating, and bedtime eating separately. You should take your creatine sometime around when you work out, either before, after, or both. Bodybuilding.com offers a write-up about a study, and this study found some evidence pointing towards achieving better results when taking creatine after a workout, ...


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Bicycling can easily quantify this with modern power meters. This site has a calculator that lets you see the loss in power and speed as altitude increases. And you can compare acclimatized versus non-acclimatized athletes. http://www.cyclingpowerlab.com/effectsofaltitude.aspx As you can see by the chart, the change is fairly insignificant at 500m or ...


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In the wide group of people I climb with, the opposite is true. I'd have to agree with Liam - these days, climbing training is incredibly well balanced, with most folks combining a high degree of cardio workout with core strength, and isometrics, along with weights for extension and flexion. Hunches seem to have been an issue earlier than ten years ago, ...



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