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7

A difference of 0.3" (a little more than a quarter of an inch) is within acceptable measurement error on something like this. The answer to your question is: BMI does not matter for individuals A perfect example for the reason why is with the two tickets you included in your question: On Mar 4 2014 you had BF% of 16.2% and BMI 25.5 On Mar 23 2014 ...


7

The ideal scenario is to test your breakfast during training, as the last thing you need is to eat something that upsets your stomach. I'm not a triathlete, but have run several marathons. For me porridge with honey worked well, with a banana nearer the start time. Personally I wouldn't have the fruit salad, but everyone is different. If you have ...


6

I'd go with either a dumbbell set or a squat rack and barbell. Those give the most bang for your buck. Free weights are manageable. You can do it. Research basic strength programs. A good sign that you've accidentally found a bodybuilding program (which you don't want) is if you're doing three variations of the same movement (EZ-bar curl...and a ...


6

Rule #1: keep it simple Rule #2: make a plan and stick with it (at least for 2-3 months) Rule #3: don't hurt yourself I've been using a combination of my home gym and the local YMCA for many years AND actually get more of a workout at home. I tend to go to the Y for more 'social' aspects. Given that, I think you need to include some 'social' aspects to ...


5

I think the most versatile shoulder exercise is the handstand push-up (HSPU) or a variation of it. The benefit of this movement is that no equipment is required. I understand that as a personal trainer, your clientele may not have the ability to perform this exercise, so there are quite a few options for scaling based on the fitness level of the trainee. ...


5

Jim Bathurst, known for his web site Beast Skills, says in his human flag tutorial: If you can do several full range handstand pushups against the wall, then you’re well on your way to getting the flag. Overcoming Gravity, a popular book on gymnastic training for adults, has a chart comparing the difficulty of various skills. In the chart, a full human ...


4

Given your context (child, disabilities, beginner), I would aim for kettlebell(s) combined with focused, timeboxed workout routines, e.g. tabatas A kettlebell is simple, robust and can be used for a variety of functional exercises that match your need in terms of a relatively heavy disabled child. No moving parts, can be left outside and inexpensive ...


4

The "notebook & pen" is great from a "in use" perspective. As John says, the notebook or - as I prefer - index cards do better in the gym than smartphone/tablets. Both for the training program itself and for taking notes on weights, reps and effort. However, for the other perspective, when you capture the context (sleep, food, subjective info) and want ...


4

Tracking information is always a pain, because there really aren't any good apps for during, as you always have to be interrupting your workout to enter your weights, reps, etc. What I ended up doing was tracking food and sleep along with workouts in just a regular notebook or datebook, and then adding notes about how I felt if I had a particularly good or ...


4

I'm super surprised no one has mentioned the major source of muscle imbalance in climbers: climbing is a pulling sport more than a pushing sport. This results in overdevelopment of upper-body pulling muscles (biceps and back) relative to pushing muscles (chest and triceps). I personally have a friend who climbs 5.14 and yet has terrible back pain that ...


4

BMI simply measures the relationship between your weight and height and doesn't care if the weight is muscle-based or fat-based. You're focusing on the wrong thing: your body fat in the first measurement was 16.3% and it changed to 13.3% in the second. The second value fell within the range of your ideal body fat. You also lost over 2-kg in body fat, all ...


4

One possible explanation for the height discrepancy: consider that throughout the day, your precise height is not constant. In the morning after you wake up, you are actually slightly taller than you are in the evening when you go to bed. Another explanation is variability in posture, as well as measurement imprecision. As has been mentioned elsewhere, ...


4

Similar to the answers above - you should not experiment on the morning of your triathlon. Practice in the week leading as to what your stomach can handle with foods that are predominantly carbohydrates based. Have a look at some of the links below that support the answers mentioned (they aren't all triathlon specific but give a good indication of pre-race ...


4

Protein shakes are a food supplement, not a weight loss or muscle growth magic potion. They are only useful if you are not meeting your protein requirements through other methods. Protein shakes do not contain vitamins, minerals or fibre, which is contained in other whole food sources of protein and all of which are vital for good health. What they do ...


4

As someone who's been a competitive swimmer for many years, my input is this: You state that you're doing 3x martial arts and 1x gym workouts per week, which can be plenty or not enough depending on your physical fitness level. It's up to you how much swimming you want to incorporate into your busy schedule, but one way to approach your situation (to avoid ...


3

So, the question is, Is there such a thing as over-training? Short answer: yes. You can push yourself further and further into fatigue that you start getting weaker the more work you put in. Over training will have signs of depression, negative affects on health markers like blood pressure, total body inflammation, increase in body fat, and more. In ...


3

Yes, you can overtrain. The main theory of the training is a overcompensation/supercompensation theory: http://healthcorrelator.blogspot.com/2010/08/theory-of-supercompensation-strength.html Overtraining is a training when you body can't compensate and overcompensate damage made by workout. There is an example of the thee different workouts, where the ...


3

The body does not store complex carbs directly as fat, usually. The study you read might have been referring to a condition called insulin resistance. For carbs to be stored as energy it requires the release of the hormone called insulin. Insulin will direct blood glucose into your cells to eventually be stored as glycogen, however if you fuel up on too many ...


3

I'm a big fan of freeweights, but I recently picked up a set of resistance bands from Amazon and I have been very impressed. You can get up to 200 pounds of resistance for very low cost. What got me interested in looking at resistance bands is their use by trainers of professional athletes. I have seen videos on youtube of football players, who weigh far ...


3

First, your BMI is something you can safely ignore given that you have ways to determine your body fat. BMI is an easy 'statistical' tool for getting rough 'population' obesity numbers. BMI for individuals does not have a dependable relationship to obesity and/or to obesity related health issues. Your body fat percentage is what matters, and looking at that, ...


3

There are three main divisions of the autonomic nervous system (ANS): Sympathetic - governs your stressed state which includes fight/flight/freeze reactions. Parasympathetic - governs your "at rest" or restorative operations. Enteric: governs your gastrointestinal system--not really relevant to the discussion but included for completeness. When your ...


3

Bottom Line Up Front: 2-4 weeks is a very short amount of time to get from walking time-to-time and knee pushups to a 2k* run and 80 pushups. You can exhaust yourself quickly, but your body needs time and rest to get faster and stronger. I'm going to ignore your schedule, and just talk about how I think you can get to your goals the fastest. You'll ...


3

You can't get better at running by walking. If you can't run 2km then at least run for 30 seconds, then rest while walking, then run again, and so on. Look up "couch to 5k" schedules to see examples of regimented programs for this kind of thing. For the push-ups, do negative push-ups instead of knee push-ups. Lower yourself to the ground, rest for a moment, ...


3

Speaking as both a long time (30 yr) martial artist and a former (17 yrs) competitive swimmer, there are a few considerations when using swimming as your sole cardio support. Swimming: I would first progress until you have a solid endurance type base for swimming. Since you do martial arts 3x and gym 1x per week, you initially don't want to be adding in a ...


3

Either one will suit. You won't be able to sustain the maximum wattage for more than a few minutes, and if you can, your wattage meter is lying to you. This is a link to an SRM (crank based power meter) power analysis from Mont Ventoux, one of the final stages of the Tour de France. The first part of the graph shows the "leadout" (Usually refers to the ...


3

What you’ve described is not an average training routine in my opinion. You’ve got a pretty heavy workload if you consider holding a job as well. You make no mention of the amount of weight, sets, or reps that you perform, so, I’ll assume from your description of not trying to build muscle, that those numbers are sufficiently low. Effectively, you’re ...


2

In the wide group of people I climb with, the opposite is true. I'd have to agree with Liam - these days, climbing training is incredibly well balanced, with most folks combining a high degree of cardio workout with core strength, and isometrics, along with weights for extension and flexion. Hunches seem to have been an issue earlier than ten years ago, ...


2

Honestly, I think you need to start working out more consistently. Every 2 to 5 days is not consistent and if you expect to get results from that, you probably won't. Strength training and muscle gain both require a lot of commitment to both your workout/training and your diet. It varies from person to person but expect 45 to 60 minute high intensity ...


2

Your routine is fine for general weight loss and fitness, but I don't think (other than being able to complete the distance comfortably) that it is optimal for 5k training. I would recommend adding in a lot more running between now and then, being careful to not overdo the distance. Right now you are running 3 days a week, although you don't detail how much ...


2

If you can, look into the Strong Lifts program. WIth that, all you need is a barbell and other free weights. If you're not interested in building a lot of muscles, you can look into P90X. It doesn't require a lot of equipment and you can begin to see and feel results as soon as possible. It has flexibility, strength, and agility sections. Insanity is ...



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