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Chin-ups Chin-ups pull-ups pull-ups pull-ups chin-ups pull-ups, chin-ups chin-ups. Chin-ups or pull-ups, as well as chin-ups, or chin-ups and pull-ups, alternating between chin-ups and pull-ups on different days, chin-ups chin-ups chin-ups, pull-ups chin-ups, chins, pulls, chinning and pulling. Specifically, chin-ups and pull-ups. Chin-up negatives, ...


5

This program looks like a lot of exercises with not a lot of weight. Even if your goal is getting big purdy muscles, I'd reduce the number of exercises and focus on getting better at a wider variety of movements. Stick to one kind of curls per workout--you're not big or strong enough to need more than one. After removing a bunch of exercises, I'd put more ...


5

One misconception you have: "just lean muscles": All muscles are lean. There is no difference between the lean-ness of one person's muscles and another person's muscles. The difference is in the amount of bodyfat they're carrying. If you want a body that is muscular, but not bulky: Strength-train or body build until you're at the level of muscle that ...


4

The hardest part will be the transition when you are at the top of your pull up. To start, do this motion in reverse. Start by jumping up and getting yourself in the position that you would be in at the top of the muscle up, with your arms locked looking down on the bar. Then, slowly lower yourself down into the position you would be in at the top of the ...


4

All you have is a list of exercises without any description as to training splits: how often you train and what you focus on each day. Additionally, in all that work you only have one lower body exercise that is questionable on its mass building capabilities. I recommend you split the work up into 3-4 training days per week, and try to keep the work so ...


3

This question might be more suited for the parenting stack exchange, however there are a few things you can try. First of all, holding and moving a baby (or any deadweight) relies less on raw strength and more on static holds of a load and leg and core strength. Also, this will be one of the more ridiculous things I've written, ever... Note : Always use ...


3

If you want to have the body of a runner, you need to run. Likewise, if you want the body of a powerlifter, lift; rower, row; rock climber, climb; etc... The good news is that marathon runners only run marathons during a race, but will often do upwards of 100km a week when training. Start slow and look at programs like Couch25K that will get you running. ...


3

There are upper body movements that involve the biceps, but none that isolate them specifically like you can with dumbbells or machines. Examples include: Chin Ups Inverse Rows or high bar variation Basically anything that involves pulling will involve the biceps, and more so if you do it with a suppinated grip.


2

From Stumptuous.com, a recommendation for the disabled to get to the gym. The description lacks specifics but may be useful regardless: For the record: I’m a 32 year old woman with multiple sclerosis. My experiences are, of course, bound by the particular quirks of my own crippled body and may not always be representative of yours So, why hit the ...


2

Based on the information in your post, and particularly with the fact you talked to your PT and he gave the green light, there is nothing to prevent you from training at the gym. The challenge is figuring out what you can do. In this answer I'm going with the presumption that the balance problems has to do with strength and muscular stability rather than ...


2

Pick five: squat, deadlift, bench press, floor press, dips (weighted when strong enough), pullup (ditto), chinup (ditto), standing overhead press, SLDL, one handed row, barbell row (Yates style), T-bar row (can be done by fixing one end of a barbell in corner of room). Just pick five and make sure those exercises cover the entire body (for example: squats, ...


2

I would, too, advise to explore some gentle form of movement as Dave suggested earlier in his comment. If you are looking for motivation and a starting point, this might be a good one: http://grimmly2007.blogspot.hu/2009/06/developing-practice-part-23-then-and.html


2

Shadow boxing, or punching a bag would work. You've just got to be willing to punch at a pretty high frequency for long periods of time. If your goal is just fat burning and you have an injury though, it might just be a good opportunity to eat a lot less and let your body burn the fat.


2

The late Dr. Leonard Schwartz's Heavyhands program dealt specifically with how the upper body and most specifically the arms were able to boost aerobic performance by taking some of the strain off the legs, ankles, and feet. As a matter of fact he developed because he was a runner and incurred a leg injury. It was huge in the 80's and still has plenty of ...


1

You should always train them together. Naturally most people have a muscle imbalance, right arm stronger than left arm is a common one but as long as you train them together they'll eventually even out even if physical appearance may be slightly different. Just because you don't feel as though you've pushed to the limit doesn’t mean you haven’t made an ...


1

Complexes Make a pair or set of upper-body exercises you can do, and do those with no rest between them and little or no rest between rounds. Use bodyweight exercises as well as resistance tools like dumbbells, barbells, and kettlebells. For example: Alternate sets of dips and push-ups, with 0 to 90 seconds rest between rounds (pick a given rest period ...


1

I don't see any specialized requirements for a cyclist other than "avoid squats because my legs are fried", so a generic upper-body strength workout sounds fine. One slapdash version might look like this: Three sets of pull-ups for maximum reps with good form Overhead dumbbell press, warming up to three heavy sets of 8 If you have heavy enough dumbbells ...


1

Chin-ups and pull-ups. If you don't have a pull-up bar, buy one, or go outside, parks and playgrounds will often have such facilities. If you don't have a pull-up bar, or while you're waiting until it arrives, you can do isometric bicep exercises, using eg. a table (putting your hands under and pulling it up) or a towel (putting it eg. under your toes and ...


1

Tabata, like sprinting, has significant anaerobic involvement (sprinters look muscly, runners look skinny). Your legs probably look fit and cut because your muscles have had to make significant gains (hypertrophy) over the last two months on the elliptical. If you were to total up calorie expenditure from each area of your body during a workout, I'm sure ...


1

Geek! I like your question. Here are some thoughts: EMG studies show that pull-ups and chin-ups to not target your lats as much as bent-over rows. Half pull-ups at top or bottom has no significant difference when it comes to lats activiation. Behind the neck pull-ups hurt your shoulders because you have placed the greatest amount of stress on your biceps ...


1

All recovery is shared All training takes a toll from all other training. This can be minimized by working separate parts of the body or separate metabolic pathways, but in the end your ability to recover from any workout is shared across all workouts, all you eat, all your stress, all your sleep. Running and arms work sounds fine That said, if you're ...


1

The only effect I have seen is sometimes my arms or shoulders will get sore while I run. This all depends on how hard you go with both running and arm work. I don't think working out your arms will HELP running in any way if that's part of your question whether it have an "effect". Although if you do find your arms ever getting tired during runs, ...


1

If you are swinging you are most likely trying to go too fast or you are lacking strength so the natural reaction of your body is to generate additional momentum so you can complete your pull-up. Thus, here's what I suggest to you. Find a bar that is tall enough so when you hang off of it your feet won't touch the ground. Assure that your whole body is ...


1

Inverted shrugs are the way to go in my opinion. Please notiche that they are bodyweight, but they are not equipment free, though. You have to build a TRX-like device (I did with less than 10 euros) and find a place to hang, so it's impractical if you're looking for something to do with nothing more than your own body. If you want to ditch the gym and have ...



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