Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

The odor is standard (although possibly more acute) bacterial foot odor. Spraying them with Lysol after use will make them go longer without needing washed, as will putting them in a (very) mild bleach/water mixture. Basically anything to kill the odor-causing bacteria (laundry detergent is typically not anti-bacterial), washing them in the sink with an ...


10

I would highly recommend checking out "The Definitive Guide to Cleaning Vibram Five Fingers" on birthdayshoes.com I can personally attest to the success of daily wiping of the feet with tea tree oil, and soaking the shoes in a basin with a few antibacterial denture tablets (2 in each shoe for a small basin, more for something larger). For really nasty ...


9

The Nike Free 5.0 was one of the first running shoes designed to simulate barefoot running. The "5.0" was supposed to indicate that it was half way between running with a traditional shoe (10.0) and running barefoot (0.0). You might find the 3.0 to be good for regular running. There are lots of minimalist running shoes you just need to decide what it is ...


7

I don't know Ivo or Greg but they are so far off base that I would ignore them. Vibram Five fingers are made to run on ANY surface. It has nothing to do with running style, cement, etc. It forces you to change the way you run to a more natural manner. If you are a heel striker...you will soon quit that. The Bikala is just fine for distance running. Some ...


7

http://barefootrunningshoes.org/ has a pretty comprehensive database. My suggestion due to the irregular toe length issue would be the Vivo as it has the widest toe box.


6

New Balance Minimus Merrell True Glove


6

Especially in running, I am a firm believer in "If it isn't broken, don't fix it". The whole movement of Chi/Pose and extreme minimalist shoes has grown out of a misconception and bad application of "heel striking". Heel striking does not mean that your heel touches first, it has to do with where your foot is when the majority of your weight falls on it. ...


6

A callus (or callosity) is a toughened area of skin which has become relatively thick and hard in response to repeated friction, pressure, or other irritation. Wikipedia It is the defense reaction of your body, and, given the circumstances – running barefoot, in Vibram shoes – it's fully normal. I don't know why are you running without socks, but if ...


5

I've never had similar problems in my Vibrams, but then I wash them after almost every use (if I did something like running to get sweaty - I also love them for weightlifting which doesn't cause me to sweat nearly as much). Think of it this way: you're wearing them directly against your skin and they'll be in contact with any sweat or dampness. Would you ...


5

Minimalist running shoes are shown to increase cadence and decrease stride length. Decreased stride length - many heel strikers become forefoot strikers. This usually allows for more efficient pace because the leg lands under the body's center of gravity. It also means the big muscles are being used for propulsion and the small muscles aren't "braking" ...


5

I actually run in vibrams, and when I first began my calves were extremely sore for the first week or two. I think this is due mostly to the fact barefoot running forces people to run as nature intended, on the ball of the foot, causing the calf to work harder in order to support the weight. This would also put more tension on the Achilles tendon since it ...


5

Calf tenderness is a common occurrence with barefoot/minimalist running. The achilles is in the back of the leg, from the knee to the back of the heel. It is NOT a shock absorber, but is a stabilizing muscle and propulsing muscle. It works harder when one runs barefoot. Barefoot running is something that needs to be very gradually introduced into a ...


4

I know guys using the Bikala for marathons. I use Sprints for training which sometimes means running on cement. I feel they are fine if you change your running style. I've switched to running Pose (as best as I can) because of other knee issues, and since there are no hard impacts the lack of any support is not an issue. I don't think you would get very far ...


4

Think like a dancer Dancers (ballerina, tap, etc) obviously put a lot of strain on their feet and deal with blisters on a regular basis. Therefore, I'd trust that they have some pretty good advice on prevention. The following quotes were taken directly from this site. Make sure your shoes fit The easiest way to get a blister is to wear dance shoes ...


4

The RunAmocs from Soft Star Shoes are nice. I have a pair which I've reviewed here. Actually my review talks more about the transition to minimalist shoe running than the shoes themselves, but you can get the idea. They are very lightweight shoes with a Vibram 2mm rubber sole. When I first put them on they didn't seem to fit very snug like I'm used to. ...


4

Your improvement makes complete sense. By switching to the Vibrams, you probably changed from a heel striker to a mid-foot striker. You've also traded the stability, cushioning, and restriction provided by the shoes for strength in your feet and legs. You are now stronger and have better form. If the shoes are the only variable you've changed and your ...


3

Uh, no, they aren't worth your ROI. The main purposes I see in Vibram Shoes is to strengthen the supporting lower leg muscles and to change your running gait to put you more on your toes. Vibram shoes are training tools within themselves. The shoes should be worn progressively similarly to how you would progress a workout -> maybe 10 minutes a day ...


3

In my opinion 100% barefoot is still the way to go. It's the most natural way as well. The only good reason to run with Vibrams is temperature. Running 100% barefoot is better for your running posture. You start using your hips to absorbe shoques. This implicates that you will not constantely burden your achilles tendon by running on your front foot like you ...


3

If you're considering the Bikilas, go with Bikila LS instead — the new lacing system is dramatically better and won't chafe like the old strap sometimes did. I don't have experience with the other two types you listed, but I've run on plenty of cement in the Bikila LS. I've found that landing evenly in the middle of my foot minimizes pain from running ...


3

They're machine washable, just wash them regularly. Vibram FiveFingers® footwear is machine washable. Use gentle, warm water cycle with liquid or powdered detergent. Hang to air dry. From: http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/faq/


3

As others have said, WEAR SOCKS if you can. (Personally I can't wear the socks while running because they wedge painfully between my toes.) Two unorthodox yet natural cleaners of my VFF's: 1) The ocean. Wear your VFF's surfing or otherwise have them in the ocean for some 30 minutes, and they'll be clean as a whistle. 2) Playa dust at Burning Man (a.k.a. ...


3

These maybe a little closer to barefoot than you are looking for, but Luna sandals are a good option. Odd size feet are no problem because you measure your foot, send them the measurements, and they custom cut the sandals.


3

No, it will not go away. Unless you do something about it. Since you've been running in Vibrams for "quite a while" your feet should have adapted by now, and you should be able to run without pain in your feet. The muscles in your feet should have gained enough strength after 4-8 weeks. The joints, connective tissue, and tendons might well take longer; ½-1 ...


2

This is how I clean my five fingers, it's my little secret and it does not smell afterwards. After each wear of five fingers, I always blow at it with a fan. It will help dry up the sweat much more quickly and will slow down the bacteria build up. Once it start to stink or have odor. Usually 1-2 months of wear. I do the following. I put dish washing ...


2

Use deodorant on your feet before you wear them. Prevents them from stinking in the first place. My boyfriend has 2 pairs and they stunk so bad and then the guy at REI suggested that and they have never stunk again. They smell because your feet sweat, so stop your feet from sweating.


2

I wash in a low-water front loading washing machine every few days (1-2x per week). I also use a Tea Tree Oil liquid for the soap. I use a pre-wash cycle with the tee tree oil in both times and no other detergents. Once done they come out and go right in front of a fan to dry. I've been doing this for a year with my shoes as well as my two daughters' and we ...


2

I too have had to look at ways to combat the odor. First, I just ignored the problem and continued to wear my VFF's while running and working out at the local gym. It was until one day a trainer recommended OxyClean detergent. She kindly made the comment about my VFF's could be washed using this detergent. I've been washing them once a week, and it seams to ...


2

VFF's used to be a bit of a fad in the ultra community. We do see people show up with them at the start line. Unfortunately, we rarely see them at the finish line because they drop early. I would suggest that if you find VFF's painful for long distances then you consider slowing down your training and building endurance adaptations in your feet before ...


2

The most likely cause for the blisters is the forceful rubbing of the Vibrams on your foot during the run. The fact that the stitching matches where you got the blisters supports the fact. In order to prevent the blisters, you have a couple options: Keep causing them until your foot develops callouses to provide a natural barrier Add your own barrier ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible