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13

My sensei used to work out with ankle weights and wrist weights when he was younger. This was against his sensei's advice. He would keep doing it until they wore out (and shot the metal bars out the bottom when he was kicking a target), and then replace the weights. The bottom line is that the body is not meant to deal with those additional stress of that ...


12

Running is harder on your body that walking. This is a pro. It can also, if not addressed correctly, turn into a con. Running will push your muscles, tendons, joints, lungs and heart more than walking will. When you run, your feet will hit the ground harder, your muscles will contract faster and with more force, your lungs will need to supply more air, and ...


10

Yes, combining strength workouts with non-strength workouts will reduce the effectiveness of the strength workouts. Of course, that should be acceptable if your goal is broader than pure strength. Per Tom Kurz' Science of Sports Training, page 174: Combining strength exercises and endurance exercises in one workout reduces strength gain without ...


9

About.com has a nice article about ankle/walking weights. They estimated the following: Adding weight will allow you to burn more calories per mile, but only about 5-8 calories more per mile for every 10 pounds added. Compare that to walking a quarter of a mile - a 100 pound person burns 15 calories in a quarter mile at an easy pace, while a 200 pound ...


9

The Old Science: "Walking Is Enough" Let's frame the health question with some data from the American Heart Association: A sedentary lifestyle is one of the 5 major risk factors (along with high blood pressure, abnormal values for blood lipids, smoking, and obesity) for cardiovascular disease. The American Heart Association used to say (and the ...


8

I have been using a treadmill desk for over two months now. It's been a terrific experience, and I can already say that I recommend it highly. I walk at 1.5mph and looking at the display right now I've crossed 700 calories burned today. I've lost about 10lbs, and I don't see that changing. I wrote a blog post about my setup and the benefits I see from it. ...


8

If they're not causing injuries then they're absolutely fine. If all you're doing is walking a few kms (and the distance is much less than what you're running) then they're perfectly fine. If they start wearing so much that they change your walking style or you start getting symptoms of injuries (such as shin pain) then I would chuck them.


8

When walking, it is recommended that you gently place your foot on the ground heel first with your knee just slightly bent. Some people have actually devoted time to observing the form and posture of individuals from cultures where traditional, natural posture and movement are still intact. Individuals from these cultures very rarely experience back or ...


7

Movement is actually an essential part of maintenance and recovery. Many regenerative processes depend upon impact and activity to repair and build themselves. An example of this is synovial joints. From my knee pain article: Great, [synovial] fluid seems to do everything. Maintains your joints, lubricates them and even helps with shock absorption. So ...


6

Make sure you're getting enough potassium. Sodium and potassium are both critical to fuel your muscles. The typical diet is rarely deficient in sodium. But it is common to have low potassium levels. In fact, an increase in physical activity will increase your body's demand for potassium. That could explain the prolonged soreness you're experiencing.


6

Every mile you walk burns about 100 calories. The farther you walk, the more calories you burn. So yes, you can still burn fat and lose weight with a good walking program. You can even do some interval training with your walking, by speeding up for short intervals and then slowing back down to your normal pace. As to your knee pain while running, it ...


6

Short answer, yes, they can. Long answer: Joint movement is essential to the joint's health as the synovial fluid bathes the cartilage and nourishes it. Think of the synovial fluid as "oiling the joint". High impact can be detrimental to the joint surfaces because of the pounding and compressive forces on the cartilage. Running over many years, esp. if ...


5

I came across this article today on calories burned when walking versus running the same distance. The important points are that you burn 5 calories for every liter of oxygen you consume while exercising, and running requires you to take in more oxygen because it increases your heart rate more. That is, although you're moving the same amount of weight over ...


5

There is so much disinformation ("bro-science") in the answers and comments. I will start with answering the question: Yes, a protein shake once a day as meal replacement is completely safe. This shouldn't worry you. Do you need the extra protein? Probably not, unless you actually do resistance training (and for long term health you should) it will do very ...


4

80% of weight loss is through your diet. However, for that last 20% a low heart rate workout such as swift walking will help you burn more fat than a high heart rate workout. If knee pain is a problem, you might want to do something lower impact such as an elliptical for your cardio work. NOTE: going up stairs is a good workout that will strengthen the ...


4

I guess you should use good pair of shoe and check your body weight before trying to run longer distance rather before running only, otherwise it can be detrimental to your progress(burning fat). You can climb up and down stairways, do skipping, etc along with these(running and walking) to burn fat And also Do some weight training. If you don't want to go ...


4

Sarge has a point that if they aren't causing injuries, then it might be fine to wear them. But while the forces when walking compared to running are much lower, you typically wear the shoes much longer (10-14 hours/day vs 0.5-1 hour/day). The reason you replace running shoes is often because the midsole (and probably outersole) are permanently damaged. ...


4

I have been using a treadmill desk for the past 6+ months. As Jesse pointed out above, I do have more energy during the day than when I was in "Thinker" position all day. And yes, I have tripped once or twice, but in those cases I prolly would have even without the mill; I am the living incarnation of Jack Tripper. Some notes: My goal was not to lose ...


4

Stretch it. Toe touches and forward bends are a great way to stretch the back out. There are also a ton of Yoga poses that can help you stretch your back in various ways (I recommend checking out yoga.about.com, which has a ton of poses that you can filter by anatomy). You can do these before, during, and after the concert to help your back feel better. ...


4

To keep going for long time periods, you need to stay hydrated and to take in calories, primarily in the form of carbohydrate, and salt, to replace what you have sweated out. You can generally absorb somewhere around 250-350 calories per hour while you are exercising, and if you are working hard, you can sweat a liter an hour, or more if it is hot. I ...


4

According to Jack Daniels, the difference is the following: interval training aims to increase your VO2MAX by targeting high intensities, which can't be maintained for a longer period. By design it achieves to maximize the overall volume for those very high intensities because you have breaks between each interval. longer (several kilometres) tempo runs ...


3

Nothing is going to prepare you for being on your feet for long periods of time like being on your feet for long periods of time!! I know that might sound like something out of a National Lampoon movie, but it's true. There are many things that can improve your strength, flexibility, endurance, cardiovascular health, etc, but if you are going to be walking, ...


3

Disclaimer: I am not medically qualified, but sounds like it may be Shin Splints: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shin_splints Here's a Runner's World article with more information on them: http://www.runnersworld.co.uk/beating-injury/shinsplints---how-to-beat-them/234.html I would still see a Doctor to confirm.


3

You can try You Are Your Own Gym by Mark Lauren Body Weight Exercise at home and you don't need to buy any gym tools. You can start exercising it by doing ladders easily first then gradually getting better and better after you're used to its muscular endurance practice. I got my core fitter/tighter by doing this. I couldn't lift my body to do just one ...


3

Based on the information you have in this question (not sure if it is inspired by another), there is little benefit to stretching before you start your walk. Walking in and of itself doesn't present a tremendous load on the body or cardiovascular system. The range of motion is not greater than what you currently need for regular life. In short, stretching ...


3

I agree with parkker007, but would like to add that when running you should ideally try to run on grass/ soft ground rather than concrete because otherwise (long term) it messes up your knees and hips etc. (To my knowledge, walking on concrete is fine, so if you live somewhere with no grass.. walk to grass and then run?!) Also, go for an easy ...


3

Let's look at this from a sustainability standpoint. I think we can assume you really like walking if you are walking 10 miles. There are not many people who enjoy running ten miles. Runners get injured a lot. (1992 Nov;14(5):320-35.Running injuries. A review of the epidemiological literature.) Walkers don't. Running requires a more extensive wardrobe ...


3

I think a key indicator is "Does it hurt when I do this?" If you heel strike while running barefoot, it hurts. Heel striking while walking barefoot, however, in most cases or terrain types doesn't hurt, and is much more comfortable than trying to forefoot strike. Especially if you're wearing shoes, it takes some effort to land forefoot first while ...


3

It won't directly, but it can indirectly. You have to have a decent calorie surplus to grow muscle - otherwise your body can't build on what you've done in the gym, and you won't grow any muscles. Running alongside your workout can burn the extra calories that you were going to use to build muscle. This is probably what your friends are referring to. ...


3

I am not experienced in this, and I don't have a definite answer, but since this has been asked a week ago and there are no answers yet, I will give the information that I found. Looking through PubMed it's surprisingly hard to find information on this. The keywords which yielded the best results were "treadmill backpack". In particular, I found this ...



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