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6

You're sore Wednesday because you squatted Monday. Soreness from lifting can easily last two or three days, and even get worse on later days. It's called Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness or DOMS. Since waking up this morning, my lower back is very sore. It is as if I did a heavy workout. I don't understand why this happened. This wasn't as sore yesterday. ...


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To answer which one burns more calories, that's pretty straightforward math. Steady state cardio burns calories based upon intensity level x amount of calories per minute . In order to get that number you would need to know your heart rate during exercise and either have the hr monitor calculate the calories burnt totals for you or plug it in to a online ...


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It seems that you've already answered above in the question. I'd just like to add at least two thoughts. 1st is that there are several running techniques, such as pose, and evolution running, two mention just two others, I believe that pelvic rotation should play a part in all of them, but perhaps in different ways. 2nd, is that it'd be useful if you post ...


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This is a surprisingly tricky question to answer. What is fairly unambiguous is that, for most people, increasing activity will correlate with better health. As a race, we are becoming more sedentary with longer periods of inactivity due to the large numbers of jobs that involve sitting at a desk combined with recreation such as web browsers and video games ...


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Any form of movement that gets your blood moving in the parts of the body that you will be exercising without forcing them to exert themselves "cold" is a valid warm-up. If all you plan to do is a brisk walk, then a more leisurely stroll is a fine warm-up, certainly better than, say, couch-sitting. And many running programs suggest 5-10 minutes of brisk ...


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It's generally referred to as "runner's itch". It's caused by capillaries in your skin being flushed with blood that they're not used to. Generally, it occurs in people who go for strenuous runs, hikes, or walks, when they're not conditioned to that type of workout. I don't know what kind of national athlete you are, but I'm guessing that distance running ...


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For the heel-strike, the short answer is that neither one is inherently more or less healthy. The natural tendency among walkers is to heel-strike when walking along a smooth surface and to use toward the toe when walking along elevated or uneven surfaces. The next time you go for a walk outside, do it barefoot and pay close attention to your feet. In my ...


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Treadmill of-course. Your body will get used to the park or any env. Where you considor walking whereas treadmill will help you in varition. And as you said you can put more time and walk some more distance without treadmill, it will not help as much.. Because the more efforts you make in least the time, the more you will lose weight as compared to the ...


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Though the cause of DOMS still isn't totally understood, most contemporary research suggests that the pain comes from nerve sensitivity caused by bradykinin during the muscle repair process. Having said that, if you're still sore, your body is probably still repairing--let it do its thing. I would hold off on jogging at the pace that's causing the soreness ...


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You can make it happen! Run a bleep/multi-stage fitness test on yourself and at some point you will stop walking really fast and break into a jog. If you slow that jog speed down a bit and push off the ground so you have both feet off the ground during your stride you will have the "dog-trot"


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Someone might give you a better answer, but I'll point to some existing answers that you may want to consider. In short, diet has the largest impact on your body fat stores. Unless you have meticulously counted your calories for several days (2 weeks is pretty good), then you really can't say that you're eating properly. You don't need to count every ...


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Yes, given your weight and pace I'd expect a value below 150 Kcal. A way to confirm this would be to plug your details into a couple of the common Kcal estimation equations and take an average eg. The ACSM and MET formula: ACSM Kcal/Min ~= 0.0005 * bodyMassKg * metersWalkedInAMin + 0.0035 ~= 0.0005 * 70 * 96 + 0.0035 ~= 3.3635 ...


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It would be a good approximation, it will probably add a slight error but such a formula in itself is by necessity quite inaccurate.


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From a step count alone, I wouldn't bother as the error could be as much as +/- 40%. Primarily as your step length changes with speed, as does wind resistance and energy expended, the gradient of a walk, your body fat percentage and fitness level will also affect the calculation, but the errors these factors introduce can be reduced by aggregating several ...


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Haglund's deformity is mainly genetic and depends on your type of foot. As your brother has already had this, I suspect you might have the same type of foot and therefore have a higher risk of getting the deformity that others. Also, it's When most people first notice Haglund’s deformity, it is because the skin, bursa and other soft tissues at the ...


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Dr Peter Attia is an accomplished athlete who has remarkable athletic endurance accomplishments performed during nutritional ketosis (due to very low carbohydrate intake). His blog is well-researched and well written. I think you'll find his answer to your question is that carbs are not necessary for the type of activity you plan. My personal experience is ...


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2010 ISSN Position Stand: • Individuals engaged in a general fitness program can typically meet needs by consuming a normal diet (45-55% CHO; 3-5 g/kg/day). • Athletes involved in moderate amounts of intense training (2-3 hrs/day, 5-6 times/week) typically need to consume 55-65% CHO (5-8 g/kg/day or 250 - 1,200 g/day for 50 - 150 kg athletes) in order to ...


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This is likely a reaction from lack of oxygen due to shortage of breath. Your cells need oxygen and when they are starved, there is a build up of adenosine triphosphate that can cause a burning sensation. It's not a bad thing. It essentially means your muscles want more energy and oxygen than you can produce at that time. No damage is done and you recover ...



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