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11

The Benefits of Increasing Cumulative Work As Jonathon Sullivan notes in his discussion of the work of McBride, Haines, and Kirby in The Year in Strength Science 2011, warm-up sets may (or may not) contribute to development of maximum power: if you train to actually increase your weight on explosive lifts, won’t you also be training your 60% lifts long ...


10

Itching/tingling indicates an increase in bloodflow due to expanded capillaries and arteries. This problem should go away as you increase your level of physical fitness. If the itching comes with a rash though, it's more likely to be exercise-induced anaphylaxis (an allergic reaction).


9

The first thing I would do is revisit proper form for your parkour workouts. You could be overusing your grip to compensate for weakness in your back or somewhere else. As for lifting, make sure you're split is such that you only lift each muscle group once a week. Before training you should stretch your forearms. There are 4 stretches. Extend one arm ...


8

It sounds like you've got a few things going on here, and I would suggest seeing a physiotherapist to get a personalized assessment and treatment prescription. What I'll say here is only a guess, so take it with a grain of salt. The calf muscles are major players in skipping. When they contract, you foot goes into a plantar-flexed position, helping to power ...


8

If i got your question right, you can't do a single push-up and you want to change that. There are several ways to make "easier" push-ups. You can try to: do them on your knees standing/leaning against a wall with your hands in a higher position, on a chair or sth. If you just want to be able to do push-ups, i think you can start by doing some of these ...


7

Stop with the daily weight lifting? Try to give your body 48-72 hours of restitution between workouts.


7

It sounds like you either injured yourself or have exposed a "weak link" in your body, meaning your wrists/forearms are not strong enough to support your movements. I would suggest going into a rehab "mode" where you focus on strengthening the injured parts of your body, approx 4-6 weeks. Note I would recommend that during this period, you avoid any ...


6

Rotate your exercises. Don't do the same muscle group two days in a row. Your muscles need 48 to 72 hours rest time. "Stop doing the daily lifting?" is exactly right.


6

Neuromuscular Activation and Dynamic Stretching Here is an excellent video on a dynamic stretching routine for running. It demonstrates 9 dynamic stretches. I've been using this routine several times a week for months now. It is a great way to get warmed up before hitting the road/treadmill/trails. It includes: Walking Deadlifts (Drinking Bird) Knee ...


6

When you say "hurt", do you think its a muscle soreness (a broad, burning sensation in your muscles), or joint pain (sharp, localized pain in your elbows, shoulders, or upper back)? If its muscle soreness, that's to be expected. Joint pain is something else. Its possible that you don't have a "warming up" problem, but that you're just not strong enough to ...


6

There's not really a correlation between twitching your fingers and power in your legs. Plus, you don't "activate" your fast twitch fibers. There isn't a switch that turns them on, and they are not independent. You would also be using the slow twitch fibers in the muscle as well. So physically speaking, the finger twitching isn't doing what she says/thinks ...


5

I nix the second set at 45 pounds, but do full sets of five for all my warm-ups. With deadlifts I take bigger jumps: 145x5, 215x5, 285x5, then my work set at 340x5. Building up gradually is a great way to avoid injury. There's a limit to how much you can omit before you start rolling the dice. I'm not a big believer in the lasting efficacy of a half-hour ...


5

Actually, I do both. I run 5 minutes on the treadmill to get my heart active from a long day at the office, get the blood pumping through my body, fresh oxygen in the muscles. Then, before I work on a certain group of muscles, my first set of the exercise consists of doing 10 - 15 quick reps with a light weight, just to make sure the muscles I will be using ...


5

Here's a great article describing your symptoms, how to test and steps to take to correct: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/drryan26.htm I think the # 1 point is (from the article) Get the right diagnosis...without that, you don't really know what it is. I would have suggested against using any kind of wrist support, since long term it's not 'fixing' the ...


5

Relevance of front and overhead squats as warm-up for back squats Warm-up sets are meant to prepare the entire body for the heavy challenge of the work sets. They're not used to practice other lifts, or to be challenging in themselves. Warm-ups are there to increase flexibility and blood flow, and to practice impeccable form in preparation for the challenge ...


4

Seriously, I had this issue when I used to work as a stock boy at KMart a long time ago. The doctor called it tennis elbow. This had occurred one summer when we had been receiving tons of bikes in boxes. All the boxes were the same size, shape and weight. And I picked them all up and carried them the same way from the truck to the conveyor belt going into ...


4

+1 for the joint rotations/etc, but I'd also just do overhead presses with nothing--just move your arms up and down, with your hands at varying widths, keeping your elbows in the same plane as the body. I also do a vertically-oriented breast stroke while rotating my wrists through a full range of motion; it's one of my favorite "just move" uh... moves. ...


4

Yes, you should stretch before running, but not the sit down and reach kind of stretching. That is called static stretching, and is best done on fully warmed up muscles, at the end of workouts. What you want to do is dynamic stretching, which is the walk and run slowly recommendation. Dynamic stretching is doing motions that mimic what you will be doing in ...


4

I have been a runner for about 25 years and do not stretch before running. I use two types of warmup routines based on the type of running. If the run is a distance run I simply begin at a slow jogging pace and speed up as I begin to feel "warm" (sweat and breathing rate are good cues). When I do a sprint workout I begin with a slow lap rotating the ...


4

According to a recent study, stretching of any kind before running does not aid in the prevention of injury. The study found that stretching before running neither prevents nor causes injury. In fact, the most significant risk factors for injury included the following: history of chronic injury or injury in the past four months; higher body ...


4

Remember the standard advice for all things running: we are an experiment of one and you need to find what works best for you. You haven't said what distance you're warming up for or if you're talking about racing or merely training. Stretching Yes, the research on this is discouraging or, at best, mixed. However, a great many health professionals will ...


4

I would suggest putting goals and a exercise plan together so you can workout in a progressive manner without getting injured or discouraged. Doing 2 pull ups and being in pain for a few days is a sign that you need to build up your core and back (and probably all other) main muscle groups. Don't get discouraged, get organized, set goals and plan it out.


4

If your question is about how to keep your balance while doing one, spread your legs a little further apart. Hands should be shoulder width, and legs can be about the same.


4

If you can't yet do a full push-up, I'd work on your planks (from your elbows and also from a full push-up position), trying to keep your entire trunk, abs, and butt squeezed for several sets of 30 seconds to a minute. I'd also do incline push-ups using a wall or chair, and try some Down Dog from yoga.


3

It depends on what kind of running you are doing. If you are doing a low intensity distance run, no need to do any stretching or warmup. If you are doing a more intense aerobic run you should start with a low intensity warmup run (1/2 mile should be sufficient but ultimately it'll be dictated by your fitness level and the workout you are warning up for). ...


3

The methods that have worked for me are: A thorough morning warm-up just after I wake up the day of the tournament. This consists of rotating all my joints about 10 times, followed by a 5 minute jog or similar, and finishing with 3 sets of 10 leg swings in each direction (forward, backward, sideward) and arm swings similarly (forward and backward). This is ...


3

Based on the information you have in this question (not sure if it is inspired by another), there is little benefit to stretching before you start your walk. Walking in and of itself doesn't present a tremendous load on the body or cardiovascular system. The range of motion is not greater than what you currently need for regular life. In short, stretching ...


3

Here are some ideas for helping you put together a Stretching Program for Injury Prevention: Proper Hydration is a very important component of preparing the body for successful stretching. Shock absorbing tissues like cartilage and fascia require good hydration in order to do their job effectively. Ming Chew covers this well in his book, The Permanent ...


3

6 x 3 minute rounds seems a lot for a warm up. I would imagine you would be tired and unable to do a complete weight training program. What are your goals? and why did your personal trainer suggest this program? If your focus is on improving cardio, this might be right, but if it's strength training....you would normally do a light warm up, focus on the ...



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