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25

The kidneys of a healthy person can process about 15 liters of water a day - well beyond your current intake. The only caveat is that you can't drink it all at once! If you space your water consumption over a long enough time then it's very difficult to induce water intoxication. If you were to drink your normal 5 liters in the span of an hour, say, you ...


23

Here's an excerpt from a blog post I did a while back addressing this question: The “plug” in the bottom of your stomach is a stoma not a valve. It can be pushed open, so when you drink during a meal the liquid can push the food out of your stomach pouch and down into your intestines. There are two reasons you should care: This frees up ...


14

Yes, it is definitely okay to drink water during a workout! The main concern is to stay hydrated since an athlete that is dehydrated performs poorly. The 7 Hydration and Exercise Rules That Every Athlete Needs To Know recommends that you should drink about 600 - 1,200 ml (2.5 - 5 cups) of liquid per hour, which is just below your 1.5 liters that you like to ...


14

There's no absolute "better" or "worse" for this type of substitution. It depends entirely on what problem you are trying to solve and what nutritional goals you are trying to achieve. To answer your question most literally — "Yes", you can satisfy your daily water requirements with fruit juice. There is sufficient water in virtually any fruit juice ...


13

My experience with hyponatremia comes from Ironman racing and training. The thing I had to learn to do was to get enough salt into me. Sports drinks have no where near enough, compared to the rate I sweat at. I am at the high end of the range, 1.5L/hr or more. (Measure dry before, go out for 10 hours, track fluid in, rarely end up peeing, weigh after, ...


9

A link from Mayo Clinic. "In fact, drinking water during or after a meal can actually improve digestion." There are proponents on all sides of this question, and at this point I can't find enough definitive information that could cause me (or cause anyone to worry about it very much) to drink or not drink during a meal. I can find no mention of whether to ...


8

Answer for When are electrolyte/sports drinks necessary? It seems to me that you're basically asking 2 questions: Under what circumstances do most people need to drink sports drinks to recharge their electrolytes? When drinking large amount of water (it sounds like you drink up to 3 gallons per day), does a person need to make a special effort to ...


7

"Normal, healthy (physically, nutritionally and mentally) individuals have little reason to worry about accidentally consuming too much water. Nearly all deaths related to water intoxication in normal individuals have resulted either from water drinking contests, in which individuals attempt to consume large amounts of water, or long bouts of intensive ...


7

Joshua Carmody's answer is pretty good but I'd like to add an ultrarunner's perspective. Proper hydration and nutrition are one of the keys to completing a race, and completing one fast, so we're fairly knowledgeable about what works. The amount that Haphazard is drinking appears to be enormous to my eyes. However, as long as they are drinking for thirst ...


6

I would suggest keep doing what you're doing. You lost 20 pounds in 17 weeks. That's great progress. That progress will necessarily slow down, though. Ab visibility is largely related to body fat percentage. My guess is that you're somewhere around 20% body fat (http://www.builtlean.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/body-fat-percentage-men.jpg). (I'm assuming ...


5

Hyponatremia is a deficiency in sodium. (hypo = low level/not enough; natrium = sodium; -emia = in the blood... not enough sodium in the blood). Not enough is not an absolute value, but a concentration value. The more water you drink the more sodium you need. Sweat mineral composition As you can see in this paper, sodium is the main mineral that will ...


5

The original research that stated we need about 8 glasses of water per day included all sources. This includes water from food as well as all fluids we drink. There has never been any reputable research that show we need to drink 8 glasses of water per day in addition to other sources. Following a water contamination disaster in Walkerton, Ontario, ...


4

You're supposed to drink 8-10 glasses of water a day. 8-10 glasses of juice is a lot of excess calories and sugar. You might find yourself gaining weight at a rapid pace which maybe you want. It's like drinking soda. 355 mL can of Coca Cola = 39g of sugar 200 mL juice box of Trader Joe's White Grape Juice = 30g of sugar Just some thoughts to consider if ...


4

Let me start by saying that no amount of water will keep the doctor away. There're still many things that can go wrong. The 8 glasses of water is not backed up by any meaningful scientific evidence, it's just a rule of thumb. But it includes water from all sources including food. Making genral recommendations about things like fluid intake is bad idea as it ...


4

Water's water. As long as it is water and does not contain known poisons like pathogens or heavy metals then you'll be fine. You don't need much Mg for proper function. The well respected authority on the sceince of running, Dr Tim Noakes, is quoted as saying: Magnesium is another intracellular ion that, like potassium, is lost in sweat and urine ...


4

This was a study of 18 individuals so not really large enough to draw too many conclusions. This was under moderate use of caffeine so it doesn't say anything about the ability to tolerate large amounts of fluid retention. What is, worryingly, not mentioned is the risk of hyponatremia from fluid retention. Lastly, I'm not sure you can conclude that you ...


4

Well, hydration relies on some basic principles: Drink a bit of water, all the time (not at specific times) Under physical activity, increase frequency Use mild temperature water (20-22ºC is the recommended tmp. if I'm not mistaken) (cold water refreshes but does not hydrate, mild water hydrates but does not refresh) Include non-dry fruits & vegetables ...


4

I don't know what your body fat percentage is but you need to have around 10% to have visible abs, mine is lower and I still barely see them. One way to make your abs more visible is to do actual weighted ab exercises. Most fit people can do well over 20 situps which is no longer stimulating hypertrophy, if you try situps with some weight you may see ...


4

First, distilled water is water that had its impurities removed by distilling. Essentially boiling the water to produce water vapor, gathering the vapor and re-condensing it into a new vessel. So let's start with health implications: Hydration is all about water absorption in your body--drinking low salinity water can't make you dehydrated. You might be ...


3

Energy Drinks Generally, electrolyte drinks are most helpful for workouts lasting longer than 1.5 hours depending on how much you sweat. The more you sweat, the more electrolytes (sodium/potassium) you flush out and the more likely you are to need replacements. According to this WebMD article: The American College of Sports Medicine says that during ...


3

The purpose of the stomach is mostly to use acid and enzymes to break the chewed food into a mushy sludge that can be processed in the small intestine. Pretty much all the stomach does is take food in, store it for a while, produce acid and enzymes to make food sludge, and then slowly feed the sludge into your small intestine. Water (along with most of ...


2

I'm a fan of Dr. Thomas Levy. I've read his books. In short: If your last food has digested then you may drink as much water as you can, even a second before next meals. Non-veg food takes around 3 hours to digest and vegetarian ones 1-2 hrs, fruits 30-40 minutes etc. Don't drink when food is in your stomach as it dilutes the enzymes. Take least amount of ...


2

This is a pretty complex topic, but I'll share some of what I learned from long-distance (> 10 hour, > 150 mile) bike rides. Though many people talk about electrolytes in general, the major concern is sodium. This is because the electrolyte that is most prevalent in sweat is sodium, and because the reserves of sodium in the body aren't very big. Whether ...


2

I find Camelbak (http://www.camelbak.com/Sports-Recreation/Packs.aspx) very simple and elegant, and from my own experience after using Camelbak in military activity for a couple of years now I can absolutely recommend it. Example for your requirements: http://www.camelbak.com/Sports-Recreation/Packs/2011-Classic-3L-Intl-Only.aspx even though it is for 3 ...


2

This recent post on Science Based Running is relevant. The above answer is exhaustive, but the article covers some of the same ground with information from Tim Noake's The Art of Running. The author of the post also provides a brief analysis of some popular sport drinks.


2

Carbohydrates attach to and retain water, so when your glycogen stores are reduced from alow carb diet, there is accompanying water weight loss imperfect citation here. This is often responsible for early, fast weight loss of up to 10 lbs. This rate of weight loss is not sustainable because once glycogen is depleted, the effect stops. The water extra water ...


2

Co-signing to what you said. In the hot summer days I would always try to drink a rather cold water in order to cool down. Just how you said the body warms it up so it basically takes away from the body's temperature. It always works well for me. I also know from my doctor that very cold water will shock your system and from my dentist that it is bad for ...


1

How hyponutremia affects your body: Your body likes to maintain homeostasis (remain in the same state). When you sweat profusely you are losing a lot of different minerals. If you enter a state of hyponatremia from having too low of sodium in your system your body tries to compensate. This can make you feel lethargic, cause cramps, and some other cause ...


1

If you are getting exhausted and fatigued after only 30 minutes, the problem isn't that you need an energy drink. The problem is that you are working out too hard. The fact that you are feeling tired later in the days would support that. The point of working out is to put training stress on your system. After you have done that, when you rest, you ...


1

If you know how tall he is, you could do some calculations. This site calculates the basal metabolic rate, given weight, height and age. A 30yr old male of 110kg and height of 1.8 m, will have a BMR of 9500kJ/day. (The formula is just an approximation, and actual BMR will depend on many other factors) Next, note that 1kg of Fat stores 37000kJ of energy. ...



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