New answers tagged

1

Here is a helpful visual guide on what 10% looks like: As you can see it is possible to be 10% without a 6 pack. You need to do targeted strength exercises to get it. Your calculated maximum weight potential is 185 lbs at 10% body fat, based on Martin Berkhan's formula so you can put on more weight and still looked ripped as hell. But that weight must be ...


2

You remove fat from your body by using more calories than you put in. Jogging for 20 mins burns around 200 calories (ish). Most people need 2200 calories per day. Therefore, you cannot out-exercise a bad diet. If you want to lose weight then focus on diet instead of micromanaging the gym activity; doing that will lead you to be more successful. I looked ...


3

Depends what you mean by effective. You asked at the end about improving your RMR via increased muscle mass. In terms of this, it doesn't even come close to strength/weight training. Alec mentioned a very key aspect for this, but it's even more fundamental than that. You break down most of your muscle fibres during the eccentric part of an exercise (the ...


6

No, power yoga does not offer the same benefits as weight training. I'm not saying one is better than the other, but one thing that is not satisfied by power yoga, is progressive overload by increasing resistance. In weight training, this is one of the two primary markers of progress, alongside increasing repetitions. But again, I'm not saying one is ...


1

Please don't forget that you can't "buy" results. You can use all the L-carnitine in the world, which will certainly help a little, but unless you're actually in a caloric deficit, your cardio and supplements won't lead to anything but disappointment. I learned this through my years in high school, you can NOT outtrain a bad diet, so please make sure your ...


1

Exercise has been traditionally misunderstood as the way to reduce fat. While you can induce a caloric deficit by burning more calories than you take in and thus lose weight ("The Thermodynamics Diet"), it will likely be temporary and hunger will encourage you to return to a calorie-neutral or positive diet. "Calories-in vs. Calories-out", though simple ...


0

Cardio is all you need to lose weight. You must build up enough cardio fitness to be able to run fast and long enough, but one hour of running can burn 1000 Kcal or more. Burning the same amount of energy from lifting weights would require you to lift a weight of 100 kg over a total height of 1 km. So, you'll need to lift a heavy weight on a training machine ...


1

The importance of weight training as it pertains to fat loss specifically depends on your goals. Weight training, when done properly, will add muscle mass. Increased muscle mass equates to a higher metabolic rate, i.e a faster metabolism. This makes losing fat and keeping it off a lot easier, i.e you can eat more calories relatively, you have more room. Vice ...


1

With fat loss as a goal, weight training is generally not the solution. And to be honest, neither is cardio. Fat loss is achieved by regulating your diet. Spending 1000kcal on cardio can take hours, but saving 1000kcal in the kitchen is done in two minutes. The training you do simply dictates how your body is going to adapt to the changes. Read some ...


0

Your goals are losing fat and improving stamina. Let's break each one down. To lose fat, you must be in a caloric deficit (burn more calories than you eat). The usual way to this would be to ballpark your resting metabolic rate (RMR) and consume 500/600 calories less than this and see if you make progress, and adjust accordingly. You would want to eat the ...


1

The majority of weight loss is going to come from nutrition. What are you doing nutrition wise at the moment? As far as workouts, what you do at first is not as important as you enjoying it, and doing it consistently. Do you have experience with cardio? With weight training?


2

You're forgetting something VERY important here. As an example, consider this, if someone starts to workout their arms using 20lbs dumbbells (with no previous experience), they will eventually get stronger and the 20lbs will be easier than they were before right? So, now what if that person kept lifting 20lbs even after they got stronger? Do you think they'...


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Sounds like you're on top of your game with maintaining a healthy lifestyle and weight. I give you cuddos for that type of dedication. I read that you do not weight train but, I did not see you mention if you took your body measurements? I ask this because I completed the Body for Life Challenge once and lost a total of 17 inches with very little weight ...



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