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Assuming that you have something you can use as a bench at your home, then there are plenty of workouts you can do with dumbbells to build muscle primarily but also burn some fat, too. Try to train each part 2-3 times a week, do under 16 repetitions, and do about 2-4 sets. (Some of the following you nay need an adjustable bench for) For your chest: Chest ...


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There's a bunch of possibilities: You're gaining water-weight during workout days - either through drinking more, or from retaining more via post-workout inflammation. Personally, I can gain/lose 2+ pounds from water-weight in 24 hours, which easily masks any fat-loss. You aren't as active after your workouts during your workout-days - less walking or ...


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I recommend using MyFitnessPal app to track your caloric intake for a few weeks and tracking any changes in body weight. I don't know if you are doing this already, but make sure you also weight yourself in the morning or at the same time everytime you do it.


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Occam's razor: you obviously are not eating the same. Otherwise, you would be losing weight given the increased caloric expenditure. My advice would be buying a food scale (incredibly cheap, you can get one for about $10) and actually making sure that you are consuming the amount of calories you should. In a non related note, three and a half hours in the ...


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Regarding fat loss, I'll point you towards some info on how "abs are made in the kitchen" (ie: diet is the biggest factor) and strength training is superior to cardio for fat loss. You're not going to be able to use one of the truly kick ass strength training programs because they are all about barbells, primarily because of the compound nature. What I ...


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You are asking a question specific to the way that exercise would make you feel. Everyone is different, this includes their body's ability to respond to different stimuli and their emotional response to changes made to routines. Other people's experience may have similar, or no similarity, to what you will feel. Your best bet will be to try the different ...


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Generally it's much easier to, for example, skip eating a banana than to go out jogging for fifteen minutes. Personally I feel it's even more so when your caloric deficiency is more than 500 kcal per day. This is all just anecdotal, so I'd try it out myself if I were you. But for myself I'd just do some heavy lifting to maintain muscle and then cut the bulk ...


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"I've heard many people complain about not losing weight after a week" These are the same people who jump from program to program, expecting quick results. They're also the kind to jump on the latest weight loss fad/bandwagon. Don't be that guy :) "I've also heard people not seeing/feeling a difference after a month or so" These guys have the ...


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The question is quite generic (no objectives on train or diet given). So, I'll answer based on my experience. When I want to cut (lose fat) I give a 3 week buffer period before changing the plan (diet or train) if not seeing the desired results. For instance, you are aiming to lose 1 lb of weight per week. But, it is common for the weight to fluctuate ...


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It's a pretty broad question and all I can offer up is anecdotal knowledge, but I'll take a stab at it. If I really dial in my diet, walk a couple of hours each day, and keep lifting, I can drop about 1lb of fat per week. I think that's "noticeable" on someone who otherwise stays pretty lean. More simply, a skinny person losing 10 pounds looks a lot ...


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Losing weight does have a correlation with working out/lifting. The most important thing is your diet, not the program. The program is 30%-40% of weight loss, while your diet is the 60-70%. What you put in your body becomes your body. If you eat clean, your body will be clean (cut, slim, lean). Working out tones the body to lift the weight that you want, ...


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Your body needs to maintain temperature, when you walk in the sunlight, you have two factors warming you up, you also have two things cooling you, the contact with the relatively cold air, and the evaporative cooling from sweating. When the temperature rises, the first cold factor becomes weaker, if the air is humid, the second factor will also be weaker ...


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I would highly suggest running for 20-30 minutes, 5 times a week, is better than only once a week for an hour. Swimming and biking can also be substituted and are easier on the joints. You also must cut calories, and eat healthier to lose weight, and make sure not to oversleep, either.


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You won't lose much weight either way, but the 20 to 30 minutes every day or every other day will allow you to improve your fitness, and then allow you to exercise harder and longer (say one hour per day, 5 times per week) so that you can start to lose weigh. When I run for an hour, I burn about 1000 Kcal. This is a significant fraction of the about 4000 ...


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Running Once A Week for an Hour or 20 Mins Daily? I would say that this depends largely on the intended goal. For weight loss goals, I will advocate running 20 mins daily (ideally is 3 - 4 times weekly). Frequent running has been proven to help with weight loss. It also helps to strengthen your heart, lungs, and other body systems. It also makes ...


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In almost every case, it's better to start out with small increments on a daily basis for fitness and health, rather than one large session with long intervals. If you don't have much running experience, I would advise you to get a dedicated pair of running shoes (Shoes that you only use for running), and look into some kind of a couch to 5k type program. ...


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I'm not a nutricionist so I can't answer with security question 1. Question 2, however, is a little easier for my knowledge. In theory, in hot weather you consume less calories because your body doesn't need to keep warm so hard. You know, temperature is an expression of heat, Energy = mass * (calorific constant of your body) * (temperature increase) or ...


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This seems like a fairly reasonable projection, but keep in mind that as you lose fat, each pound (or kilo) of fat is harder to lose than the one before it. This means that your cut phase may slow down as you get towards the end. I wouldn't fret about this, its typical. I would also like to refer you to this article about this exact topic which I found ...


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in winter we naturally increase our calorie burn I think that's true if we lived outdoors, running around spearing animals and picking berries. But for most of the western world winter is a time of shorter days, less physical activity, more respiratory infections, and holidays filled with copious servings of food and drink. I mean really, how much time ...


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To expand on my earlier comment: If you fit into the population described in the study (your fat and mass are at the top end) then that regression equation claims to be fairly accurate, from the stated: residual (r) values (r = 0.836, P < 0.0001). The paper even gives the found deviations in Kj / min – arober11 Jul 1 at 0:24 But with all ...


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Make sure the roti is made from whole-wheat flour, the rice should be brown rice and the bread should be whole grain bread. Also, make sure you eat at least 400 grams of vegetables during the day. The exercise you do should have sufficient intensity, you should measure how fast you run during that 20 minutes. If the pace is slower than about 13 km/h then ...


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It's most likely perfectly normal. Bodies are not perfectly symmetrical, and while you may have the same vein in your right arm, it doesn't necessarily mean that it runs in the same place.


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My answer is based on my own experiences, as well as those of the people I train with. For completeness, references are at the end. Short answer: For endurance training, eat before you train and fast after, for strength training, eat after you train and fast before. Longer answer: When you train endurance/cardio, you'll need the readily available energy ...


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When you say "workout" I'm assuming lifting weights because you were talking about your muscles. Although lifting does help your metabolism, it doesn't really help you lose weight if you don't add cardio workouts to your workout routine. As in some of the previous comments, you can't really reduce access fat in specific areas of the body. Rather you lose % ...


1

Yes, it is time to get serious about creating and living a healthy lifestyle. The way you look is the least concern of excess weight. Your risk for diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, cancer, osteoarthritis, liver disease, reproductive problems, metabolic syndrome and sleep apnea increases as your BMI increases. Your ...


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You’re opening yourself up to lots of opinions. But, one of the indicators that could impress on you to make a change is your BMI. There are others, but, a BMI of 36 suggests obesity and the possibility of an onset of a host of medical problems. I would suggest you discuss your weight with your personal physician and get a complete medical check up to ...


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While I assume this question will be closed - it might fall outside the scope of this StackExchange - I'd still like to answer. Yes. It is absolutely time to lose some weight. Keep in mind, I do not judge you. Fat problems or heart problems? The reason I say yes, is because there is quite a bit of excess fat there. While that, in and of itself, isn't the ...



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