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6

Sports tape to the rescue! My gym used to have the same problem, to the point where some people actually started bleeding. Calluses don't really go away if you work out a lot, and so the injuries inside the hand compounded between exercises like deadlifts, pullups and EZ-curls. The staff at the gym eventually started taping the bars every day because of ...


3

You could also try out "Fat Grips". You put them on the bar and have a rubbery feel to them. They can also be placed on dumb bells and regular bars. Their purpose is to make the bar thicker to work your forearms more but they might help with your problem. If you look on amazon you'll find them and many other brands.


3

You can definitely maintain and even get stronger muscle wise in 80 minutes a week. After taking a managerial role at my company while having two young kids I started a "different" workout to maintain. I noticed that I didn't gain a lot of mass but didn't lose any and definitely gained strength and composition (slowly). I hit each major body part 1 day a ...


3

I'm going to answer your question a little sideways because I think it's important to describe what the point of a warmup is, how it is used, and the conditions that require it to be taken more seriously. I try to focus on a few things when it comes to weight lifting warmups, and break my warmup into two parts. This would be the "I just got to the gym" ...


3

The term we use in this situation is "progressive overload", or lack thereof. Yes, your body can adapt to one single movement at one single level of intensity. For instance, some people are able to do 100 pushups, but unless they add some sort of variety (increased weight, differing techniques), they won't be getting stronger from it. Their muscles have ...


3

The core basic principles that apply are the following: Total volume per body part is the biggest driver for muscular hypertophy (growth) Manage recovery to enable adding volume over time Work you enjoy ensures you are going to keep doing it Beyond this, studies have shown that there really doesn't make a tremendous difference the shape of the volume ...


2

Here are some strategies I have found to be useful. Do not program a separate shoulder day. Prefer push/pull split routines instead. Otherwise your supraspinatus and front deltoids will work twice (during chest day and shoulder day) and so your infraspinatus and rear delts as well (during back day and shoulder day). This reduces their recovery ability and ...


2

When you perform a bench press, the movement pulls the shoulder mostly inwards i.e. toward the chest, and potentially upwards and downwards depending on whether you are doing incline / decline. If your shoulders are weak, then they can easily become overloaded as your bench press improves. Ideally you should strengthen the rotator cuff from all angles, but ...


2

Two of the programs with a lot of following are Starting Strength (website / book) and Strong Lifts 5x5 (website). Whichever program you follow, the Starting Strength book is worth its weight in gold. Both of these programs are built for novices, which should be defined by strength standards, not personal opinions. They focus on compound barbell exercises. ...


2

If you're talking about a flat bench press, and if you were to follow something like the Madcow 5x5 linear weekly program: You will gain ~5 pounds a week. You have 45 pounds to gain. It will take you 9 weeks. This is predicated that you aren't over trained, you don't have any injuries, you eat and rest well, and you follow the program properly. I'd give ...


2

As the study that Greg cites shows, there is no real difference in the window for protein intake. People may be confusing this with the studies that show supercompensation of glycogen storage when carbohydrates are consumed in the period ("the golden hour") after prolonged aerobic exercise. However, you may want to reconsider doing cardio immediately ...


1

As commented by others, without seeing a video of your form or knowing a bit more information it is hard to say if you are doing proper form 100%. Even then, sometimes what one person feels is proper form and causes 0 pain, someone else might have a different reaction. I find this true especially with squats. You might want to pay attention to how straight ...


1

I think it is hard to tell anything without looking at the video. You are holding a barbell on your back, you may feel it working, so maybe adaptation is slower than expected?


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The most important element of any program is that it meets you where you are. If you're somewhat athletic and without major mobility problems, Starting Strength and 5/3/1 are two good choices among many. The key element here, in my opinion, is to avoid unnecessary aspects of bodybuilding, to develop consistency, and to work towards mastery of basic ...


1

The solution was to introduce resistance bands on post-fatigue. The weights are already moderate, and more weight isn't the answer. Cables and weights, and hitting different angles are fantastic, and the results show, but using strong resistance bands in place of cable-crossovers increases the resistance right near the end of the adduction. Holding ...


1

I've found that this article from Men's Fitness to provide some useful general guidelines. From the article: A proper and detailed warm-up moves the body in multiple planes of motion (not just forward and backward), mimics the movements performed in the workout, and starts slow then progresses to harder motions. Similarly, a good cool-down involves ...


1

This is a complete myth: there is absolute no evidence to suggest that weightlifting may stunt your growth. The reason that this myth came about was that by exercising, your body requires more calories and nutrients to make up for the increased rate of exertion therefore if you don't consume enough then your growth may be impacted.


1

Most people have horrible ankle mobility. You can see it on their squats -- ankles cave in, as do the knees. They cannot track their knees over their foot and get into biomechanically disadvantaged positions. Often the lack of hip and back mobility confounds the problem. This can be addressed by working up to overhead squats with a bar or dowel. I would ...


1

To improve grip strength try deadlift holds for time and try to beat your time. Other exercises which strengthen grip include farmers walks and weighted pull ups.


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If you having sticking points, do what Greg suggested. Working on getting the lower back stronger and overall core. Otherwise, you are just setting yourself up for disaster on that. Implement more heavy bar holds without straps and some specialized grip training. You can try wrapping a towel, squat pad or anything that can increase the thickness of the ...



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