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10

There was a 2010 study that touched on this a bit, and suggests there's more going on than muscle memory. Effects of previous strength training can be long-lived, even after prolonged subsequent inactivity, and retraining is facilitated by a previous training episode. Traditionally, such "muscle memory" has been attributed to neural factors in the ...


8

Pierce, Byrd, and Stone (1999) concluded a structured weightlifting program (including Olympic-style weightlifts such as the clean & jerk, and snatch) can be safely performed by girls and boys, ages 7-16. Interestingly, Faigenbaum et al. (1998) showed that 8 to 12 year-olds that were supervised during maximal lifting resulted in no injuries, ...


7

Taking Eric and Dave's answers into consideration, we must understand that children's bodies are still developing. They won't have what we consider complete neuromuscular control over their bodies quite yet. I believe a structured lifting program for children can be a fantastic introduction to controlled multiplanar movement. I believe we tend to throw ...


5

The medical community and the public in general seems to regard strength training as a general voodoo practice that will "hurt you". Fortunately, this has been getting debunked soundly for over a decade now. Despite earlier concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of youth strength training, current public health objectives now aim to increase the ...


4

At the level you're talking about, you can do all of it in one day. There's a related answer that discusses how to breakup weight training and running once the two start to interfere with each other. Primarily running and lifting tend to collide with lower body lifts. Also, you may want to consider doing a real strength training program such as Stronglifts ...


3

I wouldn't sweat the difference in weights you can do on one versus the other, there can be a lot of good reasons for that. The angles, range of motion, and muscle involvement all shift. On heavy barbell rows, despite your best efforts, your chest will drop a bit to meet the bar. On the lever machine, you can't get away with that. On a pure row, the weight ...


3

yes it does leave out the lower back, hips and hamstrings you use to help generate power resulting in far less weight used BUT... you get more stimulation on the target areas like the middle traps and lats no you have not Simply put if you want to gain lots of mass in your genral back then go with the pendaly or normal bent over rows but if you want to ...


2

Sprinting sessions typically are once to twice a week. When sprinting, you want to work with either low intensity (<75%), or high intensity (>95%). Don't try and skirt the middle, as you won't ream any real benefit from it. Low intensity will be good for development of improved sprinting form, active recovery, and improved endurance. High intensity ...


2

I do slow-eccentrics in every workout, in the last set of one exercise only. John Meadows has articles implementing high intensity techniques into training; and this is an example of it. For example, you can implement 3-second negatives in a dips-like movement while working triceps. Of course, everyone is different in recovery department. I think you ...


2

before most definatedly, when you don't eat u can't lift heavy when you eat to soon you'll probably feel bloated and not strong enough due to the increased energy it takes to process the food. for me an hour before is the magic timing, and I also recommend eating fat meals because it gives energy for a longer time


1

Training elements should fit into a broader and more comprehensive program. If you have a well documented program with a history of solid results and it calls for negatives, then do negatives. If you just want to do them because they make you sore or an article on bodybuilding.com said they're great, that's fine, but it's a far cry from them being an ...


1

Not gaining muscle size/definition can be a result of a great many factors, including: Bad routine / form. If you are doing bad exercises, or doing exercises badly, then your progress will suffer as a result. Most popular recommendation for this is a beginner barbell routine with progressive overloading, such as Starting Strength or Stronglifts. Not ...


1

All of your proposed plans sound fine. The only reason to separate your lifting from cardio work would be if you gained access to heavier weights. If you were lifting close to bodyweight then splitting the running and lifting into separate workouts would help you focus on each one better. As is, combine or don't combine them according to your whim.


1

Under standing circumstances I would say look at your posture, if you're naturally inclined to a more donald-duck-like posture (your but sticking out) you should squeeze your glutes and thus facillitate backwards tilting of the pelvis. When you're more of a pink-panther-type (your but tucking under) you should stick your but out more, ?squeezing your lower ...


1

cant yet comment but if you train for strength purposes you shouldn't train until failure, this zaps your CNS and that will take about 5x times longer than your musculature to bounce back. basically 1-3 is for strength and produces more muscle activation 4-7 is combined strength and muscle building 8-12 is for building muscle (I believe making more muscle ...



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