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10

After reading your comments to John P's quite accurate answer, I think the question you're really asking is "why are deadlifts so much more taxing than squats" (maybe rename the title if I'm accurate on that). If that's the case, I'd offer these up: Deadlifts put much more load on your thoracic spine, arms, shoulders, rhomboids, and hands. You can see ...


8

1) Will pilates kill my gains? Because I have heard that in your rest days, you have to sit still. Otherwise, you will kill your gains. Generally on your rest days you want active rest. As such, pilates will be great. 2) Is Pilates + Weight Training a good idea? My way of thinking behind this combination is the following: I need to better my ...


8

Each 5x5 (or 3x5) program has its own protocol for when you start stalling like you are doing. One of the more common ones, StrongLifts 5x5, suggests the following protocol for when you stall: Attempt the same weight up to 3 times After the 3rd time, take 10% off the bar and work back up If you hit the wall 3x like this, switch to 3x5 and work your way up ...


8

This sounds like muscle fatigue and is absolutely normal and expected. This happens to every single person who works out. Your muscles aren't going to be able to curl forever during a workout session. You're breaking down muscle fibers with each repetition. This means the muscle will be temporarily weaker. Resting and eating repairs muscle fibers, and make ...


8

I've often felt there were two aspects to using a weight belt. The first being the psychological sense of security that the belt provides. Belts make us feel “locked in” and ready to lift thus providing a positive framework to perform the lift. The second and more important aspect is the potential support that a belt provides thus reducing the ...


7

This is more an answer to "what are the prerequisites for training using Olympic lifts", but I expect you will find it useful since you are coming from a conventional weight training background. The Olympic lifts are great, but they are highly technical, so you will really benefit from a strong foundation. 1) Ensure you have adequate flexibility to avoid ...


7

Main difference is how deep you go. Stiff Leg Deadlift you allow your back to round a bit at the bottom, might even stand on a platform to really emphasize this. Romanian Deadlift is more of a hamstring exercise where you're emphasis is keeping your back straight and forcing your butt backwards. Ideally SLDL is completely straight though not locked out - ...


7

"Beginner gains" is a useful abstraction for what I conjecture is an interrelated set of physiological processes. Part of it is the systemic hormonal response to the first time someone does resistance training, part of it is easy improvements to neurological efficiency (i.e. you get better at the movement, so can lift more weight independent of your ...


7

As mentioned in yisrael's answer and Aequitas' comment, you're gonna need to track your calorie intake. Combining a caloric deficit by diet with exercise is going to be a lot easier than just doing one. Without exercise you may find that eating little enough for the deficit can leave you too hungry or make it hard to resist sneaking in some extra food, while ...


7

light weightlifting This will not build muscle for you. Lift heavier weights. some cardio excerise This fights your effort to gain muscle. Consider doing less cardio if you want to grow muscle. traditional Indian diet You're not giving much detail here, but more food, particularly more protein, would almost certainly help. To recap: to grow ...


6

There are many kinds of weight training. A well-designed program designed to develop strength, power, conditioning, and athleticism for sport will not make you less flexible. The movements themselves in such a program will make you more flexible and even force you to improve mobility in order to complete the program. Hallmarks of such an approach are full ...


6

I've personally only ever done this with my calves, but I believe the term is called pulsing. Pulsing is where you use very short movements. When I performed these it was at the request of my PT who had me doing several calf exercises, and at one point I'd do 10 full reps and then 10 pulses. I haven't found great information, but there is information at ...


6

"almost a month ago" - Almost? ALMOST A MONTH?! I'm going to be harshly honest here; come back in a year, and give me the new numbers. If you can't stick with the program for at least a year, this just isn't for you. In terms of health and fitness, nothing of value happens in a month. If it did, there'd be no fat people, and everyone would have rippling ...


6

Overhead work does tend to be more difficult to progress in than anything else. First thing you'll need to understand is the concept of equivalent effort. It's one way that many lifter's track progress, and decide if that 8 RM (Rep Max) was really a better effort than last month's 5 RM. All of these are roughly equal effort to a 1 rep max: 95%, 2 reps ...


6

Dude, don't stress it. Eat a high-protein diet without sweets or junk. Pick a lifting program with room for cardio. 5/3/1 is a common and solid choice for this. I see two templates working well. The first is cardio during the lifting workout: warm up work up to one or more heavy sets of a compound lift, e.g. 3x5 squat or 1x5 deadlift or something run a ...


6

My question is, what was likely the result of the second workout that day? Was it more likely to be beneficial, or harmful? You could have injured yourself, for starters. Following that first workout at 11am, you broke a lot of tissues down in your body and weakened yourself. With rest and recovery your body heals, plus a bit of size and strength to ...


6

With the deadlift (and other lifts that begin with the bar at a dead stop on the floor, such as the Olympic lifts), then taking a second or two between reps is usual, and arguably safer than doing the reps touch-and-go style (where you pretty much "bounce" the bar off the floor). The main reason, again, pertaining to deadlifts mainly, is to allow you to ...


5

I heard that weight training will lower a person's flexibility over time This is one of the many weight training myths that seem to pop up every now and then. Myth #7: Weight Lifting Decreases Flexibility. One of the realizations people who get into weight lifting have is how inflexible they are. Years of sedentary lifestyle may have tighten ...


5

Some people can train the same muscle group three times a day, every day, for months on end and see significant hypertrophy. Yet others may train a muscle group with such intensity that days are needed for recovery. As Dave says, it's very subjective. That said, I'd say it's incredibly unlikely you're overtraining, especially with your simple 6-day ...


5

"Is This Overtraining?" There is no general answer to this question. Overtraining is not dependent on a program, but rather on the relationship between the trainee, their program, their recovery ability, and outside stressors. For some people, walking an hour each day for two weeks would induce overtraining. Other people can log hundreds of miles a week ...


5

I'm going to stop you in two places. First, this line: I want to take a week or more off work, to weightlift everyday, and increase my lifts as much as I can. At maximum, and this is if you're on a great program, you'll gain 4%, tops. If you're an intermediate lifter (which I'm guessing your not just yet), you'll gain maybe 3%, tops. I squat in ...


5

Biceps and Triceps are antagonist muscles. That means when one is the primary mover, the other simply lends stability. The concept that an exercise is for a particular muscle group simply means that the primary movers do most of the work. Because they are antagonist muscles the only thing that can hit them about the same is a static hold for time. Even ...


5

Frequency Can be used to describe how often a particular movement is performed. If Lifter A squats once per week and Lifter B squats twice per week, then Lifter B squats more frequently than Lifter A. Intensity Used to compare sub-maximal efforts to a person's max effort for a particular exercise. In terms of lifting this tends to be given as a percent of ...


5

Here is a useful table that will help you get an idea of how you should be training: To put on as much muscle mass as possible, you should be aiming to utilize the ATP/Creatine Phosphate/Glycolytic energy system. So, 75-85% of your 1RM, 8-10 reps, 3-5 sets, and 1-3 minute rest time between sets.


5

First, lower back exercises shouldn't be done ONLY on rest days. Of course, since you're already hitting your lower back with squats and deadlifts, it kinda makes the comment redundant; I just needed to point that out in case you switch programs. Second, core training can be done daily. Your core muscles are strong enough to recover quickly from applied ...


5

5×5 stands for five sets of five reps. These are the sets and reps you do on every exercise except Deadlifts. Deadlift is only one set of five reps (1×5) because doing more would beat you up. Plus, Squatting three times a week will get you stronger at Deadlifts since it works similar muscles. Read more: http://stronglifts.com/5x5/ From the page ...


5

Taking a couple weeks off won't hurt your strength and could actually be beneficial over the long run as it will give your body some really good rest. I like doing a small deficit when I have to take time off of lifting, you could expect to lose a few lbs over that time. Be aware if you do go on a deficit during your time off you will probably have to drop ...


5

Your first mistake was expecting progress after 1 day. Your second mistake was doing the same exercise two days in a row. After that, I can only guess about your form, but standing overhead press is usually something that doesn't come very naturally, so you will most likely have some mistakes there if you haven't recieved any guidance.


5

There are many different formulae for calculating one's 1RM. I'll list some of the easiest-to-use ones. They'll all use two single variables; w = the weight used for testing, measured in kilograms (kg) r = the number of repetitions managed by the athlete at Lombardi Example Let's say I can do 4 reps at 80kg, my expected one-rep max would be I feel ...


5

When it comes to powerlifting, a large portion of lifters will use a low bar squat which places the bar lower on the back to sit on a muscular shelf made by the rear deltoids. This also allows the lifter to have more forward torso lean throughout the squat and shifts some of the tension to the posterior chain. This together tends to allow a lifter to lift ...



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