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1

As everyone already mentioned, your grip is fatiguing sooner than you complete a full rep. Static bar holds, pull-up bar hangs, heavy deadlifts strapless, plate pinches. Mixed grip causes some imbalances in muscle development if you are over-reliant on them. Swithching between that and the double overhand will give you the best of both worlds.


1

I know how much that sucks because it happens to me too from time to time. I don't think it is a fully wasted workout. I am doing a linear progression. Each time when I don't get a minimum amount of sleep, I simply insert one additional rest day. When I eventually go back to the gym, I always find that it was not so terrible after all, because my linear ...


-3

The most common problem is shifting of 'navel ball', it can be easily felt by gently pressing thumb on navel (Caution - examine only in the morning with empty stomach to avoid more complexities), This ball is actually a vein, if you're feeling movement of vein in center of navel then everything is alright but in case it is around(up,down,left or right) navel ...


2

Try doing all of the above with your feet turned in making sure you work through the whole range of movement


5

8 pounds is not heavy enough I doubt that you're so weak that 8 or 10 pounds is a challenge. How much does your purse, backpack, or briefcase weigh? Have you carried a 20 pound baby recently, or picked up a 40 pound child? You need to use heavier weights for them to be useful for you. Don't believe me? Pick up a twenty-five-pound dumbbell and try to squat ...


1

I often consider good workouts followed by negligible sleep to be lost workouts that need to be repeated. We don't get stronger or bigger from lifting, we get stronger or bigger from lifting then eating and resting. One and a half hours sleep is extreme. I would consider your workout nearly wasted. Get back to a good sleep schedule, eat plenty, hydrate, get ...


3

Short answer: Don't worry about it. This is a detail. Long answer: Restitution is very important, but as long as you don't go back to the gym and start doing another upper body workout immediately, you're still resting. You can, for instance, compensate by eating a bit more, and providing more nutrition to the muscles. So long as this is something that ...


0

Answering your question is difficult and requires a guess at best. The ability to recover from an exercise session is a very individual thing. There are many factors (diet, stress, age, etc.) that need to be considered, one of which, is sleep. And, the level of intensity of your workout will also factor into your ability to recover and build mass. ...


1

There is no universally "best" set/rep scheme for any goal. Building muscle can be done with any set/rep scheme (within reason), and getting them lean is all about losing fat around the muscles. Fat loss is usually done by dietting and some cardio work. We have a term called "progressive overload" which is how we gain muscle. We achieve this by using plenty ...


0

Reason 1 - you got weak low back. That is why better for you to start do exercises for your low-back separately. Don't do squats with a bar on your shoulders, move it on your chest (google front squats) or do squats at Smith, but don't put leg right under the bar - your coccyx should be right under the bar, put legs forward for this, and of course your back ...


0

This question is primarily opinion based, so, I’ll answer it in that context. When it comes to triceps development, I’m a firm believer in attacking all three heads of the muscle since triceps make up the bulk of the upper arm. For me, that means using many different types of exercises and different angles (flat and standing). While using a plate is an ...


-1

It really depends what you're going for. They will each work the tricep a bit differently. There's an article here on what you can do for the different heads.


5

Lower back soreness can be indicative of bad form or it can be indicative of heavy barbell squats. It's impossible to tell which from just the information that it makes you sore. This is because heavy squats are not a leg exercise: they are a legs, butt, lower back, and upper back exercise. The lower back is generally the point of failure in maximally ...


2

You should also look at doing some mobility work. There's a "Limber 11" video by a guy called Joe DeFranco on youtube. i started doing this a few times a week and my back feels much better on leg days.


3

As commented by others, without seeing a video of your form or knowing a bit more information it is hard to say if you are doing proper form 100%. Even then, sometimes what one person feels is proper form and causes 0 pain, someone else might have a different reaction. I find this true especially with squats. You might want to pay attention to how straight ...


3

You could also try out "Fat Grips". You put them on the bar and have a rubbery feel to them. They can also be placed on dumb bells and regular bars. Their purpose is to make the bar thicker to work your forearms more but they might help with your problem. If you look on amazon you'll find them and many other brands.


0

This entirely depends on what is your goal? is it size? is it strength? How advanced you are? You would be better off training muscle groups twice a week and split this volume into two, for best muscle growth you need about 40-90 repetitions per muscle per session x2 week. You are hitting double the amount in one session and then don't train those muscle ...


6

Sports tape to the rescue! My gym used to have the same problem, to the point where some people actually started bleeding. Calluses don't really go away if you work out a lot, and so the injuries inside the hand compounded between exercises like deadlifts, pullups and EZ-curls. The staff at the gym eventually started taping the bars every day because of ...


0

I’ve had similar interests in the context of rowing on an ergometer. I don’t know of a specific study, per se, so this may be based on anecdotal evidence. I believe it has to do with the application of leverage as seen by this discussion. What is the relative importance of body weight in improving leverage in the squat, bench press, and deadlift? ...


0

Without a video of your form, really difficult to give you a straight answer. Assuming your form is on par, try what Derek mentioned. I tend to use some long soccer socks or thick, long socks so the bar doesn't rub to much against the shins. You can also try wrapping some type of padding around the bar where it meets your shins.


1

To improve grip strength try deadlift holds for time and try to beat your time. Other exercises which strengthen grip include farmers walks and weighted pull ups.


2

As the study that Greg cites shows, there is no real difference in the window for protein intake. People may be confusing this with the studies that show supercompensation of glycogen storage when carbohydrates are consumed in the period ("the golden hour") after prolonged aerobic exercise. However, you may want to reconsider doing cardio immediately ...


1

If you having sticking points, do what Greg suggested. Working on getting the lower back stronger and overall core. Otherwise, you are just setting yourself up for disaster on that. Implement more heavy bar holds without straps and some specialized grip training. You can try wrapping a towel, squat pad or anything that can increase the thickness of the ...


-1

It won't. As long as you meet your daily requirements you will be fine, regardless how many minutes after your workout you will have a shake.


1

The solution was to introduce resistance bands on post-fatigue. The weights are already moderate, and more weight isn't the answer. Cables and weights, and hitting different angles are fantastic, and the results show, but using strong resistance bands in place of cable-crossovers increases the resistance right near the end of the adduction. Holding ...


2

If you're talking about a flat bench press, and if you were to follow something like the Madcow 5x5 linear weekly program: You will gain ~5 pounds a week. You have 45 pounds to gain. It will take you 9 weeks. This is predicated that you aren't over trained, you don't have any injuries, you eat and rest well, and you follow the program properly. I'd give ...


0

My suggestions would be: Try using a normal bench press bench (non smith machine) for normal, incline, and decline bench press. Get a spotter and do high weights with low reps or even do some one-rep maxs


3

You can definitely maintain and even get stronger muscle wise in 80 minutes a week. After taking a managerial role at my company while having two young kids I started a "different" workout to maintain. I noticed that I didn't gain a lot of mass but didn't lose any and definitely gained strength and composition (slowly). I hit each major body part 1 day a ...


1

The most important element of any program is that it meets you where you are. If you're somewhat athletic and without major mobility problems, Starting Strength and 5/3/1 are two good choices among many. The key element here, in my opinion, is to avoid unnecessary aspects of bodybuilding, to develop consistency, and to work towards mastery of basic ...


-2

The truth might be hard, but in order to really bulk up my body, I needed to go to extremes over a period of time. But my entire body is a lot more ripped now, so it was worth it. Here is what you have to do: Go to the gym for 2 hours a day for 6 months. Focus mostly on weights but mainly on cardio. Do a lot of bench press(w/spot), curls, shoulder press, ...


0

This is as close as I know of, from a 2001 study. When all subjects were pooled together, absolute RMR significantly increased by 7% (5928 +/- 1225 vs 6328 +/- 1336 kJ.d-1, P < 0.001). Furthermore, ST increased absolute RMR by 7% in both young (6302 +/- 1458 vs 6719 +/- 1617 kJ x d(-1), P < 0.01) and older (5614 +/- 916 vs 5999 +/- 973 kJ x ...


2

Two of the programs with a lot of following are Starting Strength (website / book) and Strong Lifts 5x5 (website). Whichever program you follow, the Starting Strength book is worth its weight in gold. Both of these programs are built for novices, which should be defined by strength standards, not personal opinions. They focus on compound barbell exercises. ...


3

The term we use in this situation is "progressive overload", or lack thereof. Yes, your body can adapt to one single movement at one single level of intensity. For instance, some people are able to do 100 pushups, but unless they add some sort of variety (increased weight, differing techniques), they won't be getting stronger from it. Their muscles have ...


0

There might be a way to reduce the size of your legs, but I don't know what it is. Instead, I'd recommend A) not worrying about it and B) making your upper body enormously muscular and awesome, to reduce disproportion. For instance, maybe only do squats and deadlifts every other workout, while continuing to do upper-body work? So, every workout involves ...


0

I do not intend to offend you but are you sure it is muscle or fat? It's probably more fat than muscle you may have genetics favoring to store more fat on legs than on belly. If it is fat well you can not target fat loss on a specific area(if it was possible then life would be so easy right?) but you can achieve a smaller legs by doing diet and reducing ...


1

I've found that this article from Men's Fitness to provide some useful general guidelines. From the article: A proper and detailed warm-up moves the body in multiple planes of motion (not just forward and backward), mimics the movements performed in the workout, and starts slow then progresses to harder motions. Similarly, a good cool-down involves ...


3

I'm going to answer your question a little sideways because I think it's important to describe what the point of a warmup is, how it is used, and the conditions that require it to be taken more seriously. I try to focus on a few things when it comes to weight lifting warmups, and break my warmup into two parts. This would be the "I just got to the gym" ...


1

This is a complete myth: there is absolute no evidence to suggest that weightlifting may stunt your growth. The reason that this myth came about was that by exercising, your body requires more calories and nutrients to make up for the increased rate of exertion therefore if you don't consume enough then your growth may be impacted.



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