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I'm going to answer your question a little sideways because I think it's important to describe what the point of a warmup is, how it is used, and the conditions that require it to be taken more seriously. I try to focus on a few things when it comes to weight lifting warmups, and break my warmup into two parts. This would be the "I just got to the gym" ...


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This is a complete myth: there is absolute no evidence to suggest that weightlifting may stunt your growth. The reason that this myth came about was that by exercising, your body requires more calories and nutrients to make up for the increased rate of exertion therefore if you don't consume enough then your growth may be impacted.


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5-days cycle is better but if I'll go with the 3-days cycle I would put it as: Day 1: Chest + Biceps + ABS Day 2: Shoulders + Triceps Day 3: Back + Legs


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The core basic principles that apply are the following: Total volume per body part is the biggest driver for muscular hypertophy (growth) Manage recovery to enable adding volume over time Work you enjoy ensures you are going to keep doing it Beyond this, studies have shown that there really doesn't make a tremendous difference the shape of the volume ...


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There is a recovery time for muscle-building. A common mistake when starting out is to do the same exercises every day and to stall out in gains, or to lose motivation, because the muscles don't have time to recover. That period is variable based on age, health, and individual constitution, but it is only approximately 24-48 hours. Thus, your current plan ...


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Introduction First of all, yes. Squatting is an invaluable part of growing in the scope of lifting. And the issues you are experiencing, have long-standing workarounds ready and available for you. You mention balance. This is something that will come with practice. Right now, the problem is most likely related to the fact that you're not used to carrying ...


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Here are some strategies I have found to be useful. Do not program a separate shoulder day. Prefer push/pull split routines instead. Otherwise your supraspinatus and front deltoids will work twice (during chest day and shoulder day) and so your infraspinatus and rear delts as well (during back day and shoulder day). This reduces their recovery ability and ...


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Most people have horrible ankle mobility. You can see it on their squats -- ankles cave in, as do the knees. They cannot track their knees over their foot and get into biomechanically disadvantaged positions. Often the lack of hip and back mobility confounds the problem. This can be addressed by working up to overhead squats with a bar or dowel. I would ...


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I strongly recommend YTW routine: How to do it: Grab a set of dumbbells (3-5 lbs) and stand with your feet hip-width apart. Draw your shoulder blades down and back and keep them there during the entire movement. Raise your arms up into a Y position, keeping them straight the whole time. Pause, then slowly lower back to the starting position. Repeat 10-15 ...


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When you perform a bench press, the movement pulls the shoulder mostly inwards i.e. toward the chest, and potentially upwards and downwards depending on whether you are doing incline / decline. If your shoulders are weak, then they can easily become overloaded as your bench press improves. Ideally you should strengthen the rotator cuff from all angles, but ...


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I'm a big Rippetoe fan and his use of the standing overhead barbell press. It's my go-to upper body pushing lift, I try to do it 2x as much as I bench. Being able to press your own bodyweight is a real strength achievement in its own right, and steady pressing has had my own shoulders in good shape. There's a good answer with discussion over here. I ...


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Swimming would probably be the safest exercise. A properly constructed workout plan will eliminate injuries Do not over train Know your 1 Rep Max and multi-rep equivalents Do not exceed your 1RM Capacity except in very small overload increments Do not work to failure (maximal load) every workout Use Progressive Resistance with first set workload at least ...


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There are a lot of answers floating around on here that pertain to you, but foremost I would point out that there is documented and peer reviewed evidence that strength training is effective for fat loss (more so than most cardio), so don't give it up. If you strip things down to basics, if you're adding strength and in a calorie deficit (starting from an ...


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Resistance training is anaerobic and does not, in itself, burn a significant amount of calories. Resistance training is not effective in weight loss or body fat reduction. More on RT and Weight Loss here: Resistance Training and Fat & Weight Loss A few years back there was a sensation in the fitness industry regarding weight training stimulating the ...


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Welcome to the Fitness SE! First off, well done on your weight loss so far! It takes a special kind of endurance to lose weight at that rate. Now, when you say that your weight loss has stalled, do you mean it has stalled completely? It is very likely that as you began lifting weights, your body started putting more of the diet into use, because when you ...


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It's generally not an issue unless you're at the "numb limbs" level of sleep deprivation. When you're that tired, the odds are good that your head is not entirely in the game, and you run a higher risk of doing unsafe actions ranging from exceed your ROM to over-using your muscles to forgetting to put clamps on the ends of the weight bars. If you're ever ...


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As long as you're able to recover afterwards. It won't be your best workout but it will be better than no workout.


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I believe you are referring to mixing strength and hypertrophy in the same set-rep scheme. There have been a number of small research studies published in the past decade testing this concept. Small studies, but with results significant enough to get attention. This is where all but the last set are strength sets (e.g. High Intensity and Low Volume) and the ...


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NOTE: This is an incomplete answer. There are so many things wrong with this routine. I am in the process of creating a couple of routine assessment apps to assemble the data necessary to explain further. This routine needs a lot of work. The major problems are the over training of many muscles, it does not allow sufficient rest between workout days, ...


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The only set to set workout supported by accredited strength training organizations is progressive, increasing workload from one set to another. No one recommends reducing workload from one set to the next. Pyramid Workload I do not read trendy articles regarding strength training. I have been reading research papers regularly for the past 20 years. ...


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This will depend largely on how you warm up. Starting with your max from the get-go is, as you well know, not a good idea. Warmups are essential to prevent injury. Warming up at 30-60% and then jumping up to 90-100% is going to come as a shock to your nervous system, because if you wrongly estimate how heavy it's going to be, chances are you'll mess up your ...


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No just the opposite. The article is clearly saying that there is a link that during our heavy sleep our bodies use GH to repair ourselves. What you are proposing is getting less sleep or less quality of sleep which would then reduce the amount of GH secreted to our body. Also the GH is a repair mechanism (mainly). It can be enhanced due to ...


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They're probably approaching it from a hygeine and impact-safety prospective. Two rather reasonable concerns regarding barefoot lifting: In the same way you wouldn't walk barefoot around in a locker room so as to avoid foot fungus, now that problem is extending to the deadlift platform and squat rack (and wherever else you're barefoot lifting). Sure, you ...



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