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My answer is anecdotal from personal experience. You could very well be crashing post workout. Does your "fuzzybrain" go away after you eat and drinking? Have you considered blood sugar levels post workout, or eating something more then a protein shake post workout. I would suggest. Throw in some (teaspoon or less) honey in your protein shake, to get ...


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Assuming your diet is on point, then yes, you should change program to avoid adapting to it. Trying to lose weight is somewhat different to trying to get strong (though yes, you can do both at the same time to a certain degree). Whereas getting stronger is all about increasing the efficiency of the exercise, be it tweaks to your form or the ability to ...


2

If it's working for you, keep with it. The reasons for switching are generally either for novelty (keeping the same diet for a prolonged amount of time can lead to more "cheat days" because you're tired of watercress sandwiches and grapefruit smoothies, and the fun of trying something new might motivate you) or to deal with accommodation (if you're doing the ...


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You will only loose weight if your eating less than your daily required amount of calories. I would work out how many calories your consuming a day, apps like my fitness pal will help with this. Then every couple of weeks reduce the total daily amount by around 100-200 calories.


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First, your question is very much rooted in opinion, so, here’s my opinion. You stated that you want an “Aesthetic” physique. Aesthetics implies balance. By your own admission, you’ve indicate that your “upper body is lagging”. Your current routine may not sufficiently address this concern. You should consider rearranging your training to prioritize the ...


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To be honest, I actually like what you've done. When I was cutting weight for a powerlifting meet, I did something similar. Now, you say you want to look good (i.e aesthetics), balanced, and be strong. In other words, you want to lose body fat and keep or increase all your strength. Let me break it down a little. To look aesthetic, you need to lose body ...


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If you want to "look good", I assume you want to have quick results. Indeed, it seems you have a weak chest. In general, people going to the gym to "look good" put the heavier weights on bench presses (normal, incline...) You should therefore concentrate on your upper body, thus doing longer sets for bench press, and switch exercises randomly. For example ...


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I don't see any immediate problems with it. But it sure is a lot of volume. Make sure you can properly recover from it. There's some programs I'd consider an excellent step up from a linear progression on a beginner program, like SL 5x5, that could be a good prep for going towards higher volume and specific goals. The Texas Method is a great template that ...


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First of all, you'd need to know what it is you're getting. Osta-Red contains ostarine, which is another name for a substance known as enobosarm. Its chemical formula is (or should be) (2S)-3-(4-cyanophenoxy)-N-[4-cyano-3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-2-hydroxy-2-methylpropanamide. However, the name "ostarine" has also become associated with andarine, which has ...


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Osta-red is ostarine, or more commonly known as, Enobosarm. Answer below is adapted from the elite fitness forum What is Ostarine? Ostarine is the SARM (Selective androgen receptor modulator) that GTx is developing for the prevention and treatment of muscle wasting. It is currently undergoing clinical trials and may eventually be the medical prescription ...


1

The additional weight could be due to a number of factors: You have ignored the weight of the bar. A Olympic barbell is 20kg (sometimes 13.5kg). A Ez bar (cambered) is usually 7.5kg. A thicker bar means your forearms are working harder to hold the weight. Stand on a pair of scales with either weights and then work out what the difference is.


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You don't "start over" unless you stop lifting for several months. The point is to always be stronger for the rest of your life. The point is not to lift the weight and then pretend you can't lift the heavy weight. If you miss a rep on one exercise, it doesn't affect the others. They track separately. If you miss one rep of, say, a squat, then try that ...


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Quick answer: No, not a good routine, you probably won't get much stronger or bigger. I recommend HST training and eating 30g of protein within 30 minutes of each time you lift, and lift every other day. You will gain strength and mass and will not plateau.


4

There's this idea in hypertrophy training that rest periods should be kept short to keep metabolic stress on the muscles high, and that this will be conducive to growth. Taking your example, suppose you want to focus on triceps. You could do benches to get both triceps and chest work, then superset with triceps extensions which isolate the triceps. The chest ...


4

For starters, it might be useful to distinguish "push/pull" and "push/pull/legs". In PPL, the legs get a separate day. Let's assume PPL for the rest of this post. The way I see it, but I could be wrong, is that for the intermediate or advanced lifter (it isn't that great for a novice) PPL is simply very convenient. A novice would want to do 3 full-body ...


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Taking a slightly different tact, given your lack of equipment, why not go for a mostly bodyweight workout? I trained exclusively with bodyweight for a few months when I was really concentrating on my climbing, and I was amazed at the amount of muscle I gained (and the amount of fat I lost). There are some very good resources for bodyweight workouts, some ...


3

In my opinion, this plan is not efficient and therefore you should change it. There is a couple of reasons for that: Your program should be progressive and not static. There are a few ways of making progress from one workout to another: Increase weight per set Increase reps per set (or adding sets) Reduce rest time between sets Every single ...


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Short answer: no, not really, especially not unless you have a decent way of incrementally loading these exercises with more weight. Long answer... You wish to gain muscle, and, I assume, some strength. The two go hand in hand anyway. This requires inducing an adaptation in the body. You must produce a stress that your body is currently not equipped to ...


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With the deadlift (and other lifts that begin with the bar at a dead stop on the floor, such as the Olympic lifts), then taking a second or two between reps is usual, and arguably safer than doing the reps touch-and-go style (where you pretty much "bounce" the bar off the floor). The main reason, again, pertaining to deadlifts mainly, is to allow you to ...


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How to Deadlift with Proper Form: The Definitive Guide Proper Deadlift form starts with the weight on the floor. Pull the bar until you’ve locked your hips and knees. Return it to the floor by moving your hips back first and then bending your knees. Rest a second between reps and repeat. Do five reps total on the StrongLifts 5×5 program. Read ...


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Traditional indian diet means carb-loaded with a lack of protein, at least from what I've experienced of Indian cuisine. Your macros are likely not good with such a diet. You have to adapt. It's 90% diet and 10% what you do in the gym.


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light weightlifting This will not build muscle for you. Lift heavier weights. some cardio excerise This fights your effort to gain muscle. Consider doing less cardio if you want to grow muscle. traditional Indian diet You're not giving much detail here, but more food, particularly more protein, would almost certainly help. To recap: to grow ...


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The question is rather vague, but there are a few potential reasons you aren't gaining muscle. Remember, these are only possibilities, since it is hard to diagnose the problem off of very limited information. 1) You have not been lifting for a long enough period of time. After two months of lifting, you "might" notice changes in your body, assuming you ...


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Why 1x5 deadlifts so often? One heavy deadlift set to five reps can be plenty for most people. Most novice programs don't include a lot of deadlift volume because there's no need for more than one set of 5 if you're also doing plenty of squat volume. Plus, bad form in the deadlift is Bad News, plus novices trend towards bad form after a set of heavy ...


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Yes, you can absolutely design a program around deadlifts, but the real question is should you. Few years back, I wrecked my shoulder in a climbing accident, and I found that all I could really do pain free was deadlift, so I deadlifted every day. I can't remember the exact program, but it was based around multiple singles every day, increasing the number ...



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