New answers tagged

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Traditional indian diet means carb-loaded with a lack of protein, at least from what I've experienced of Indian cuisine. Your macros are likely not good with such a diet. You have to adapt. It's 90% diet and 10% what you do in the gym.


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light weightlifting This will not build muscle for you. Lift heavier weights. some cardio excerise This fights your effort to gain muscle. Consider doing less cardio if you want to grow muscle. traditional Indian diet You're not giving much detail here, but more food, particularly more protein, would almost certainly help. To recap: to grow ...


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The question is rather vague, but there are a few potential reasons you aren't gaining muscle. Remember, these are only possibilities, since it is hard to diagnose the problem off of very limited information. 1) You have not been lifting for a long enough period of time. After two months of lifting, you "might" notice changes in your body, assuming you ...


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Why 1x5 deadlifts so often? One heavy deadlift set to five reps can be plenty for most people. Most novice programs don't include a lot of deadlift volume because there's no need for more than one set of 5 if you're also doing plenty of squat volume. Plus, bad form in the deadlift is Bad News, plus novices trend towards bad form after a set of heavy ...


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Yes, you can absolutely design a program around deadlifts, but the real question is should you. Few years back, I wrecked my shoulder in a climbing accident, and I found that all I could really do pain free was deadlift, so I deadlifted every day. I can't remember the exact program, but it was based around multiple singles every day, increasing the number ...


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I'm not saying I can back this up with strong direct evidence, but doing things in any order other than Primary heavy compound core lifts Accessory work ...feels insane and wrong to me. So yes, I feel there's a convention, and that is to put the important stuff first (after a general warm-up and specific warm-up, of course) and the accessory stuff after. ...


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All in all, I'd say it doesn't matter too much, as long as you get them done. If you place them before your compound movements, they will provide a good warmup so that when you jump into the squat rack, you're properly warmed up, and there is less risk of injury. However if you went hard on the accessories, you might have to sacrifice some plates. That's ...


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Previous answers all missed a crucial aspect... the belt works by allowing you brace your abdominals against it. It doesn't "support" the back. It allows YOU to better support your midline/trunk/core/fad-name-for-that-area more effectively. Generally, you should do as much work as you can without the belt (get used to generating that intra-abdominal force ...


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5x5 deadlift is absolutely fine, but not during the SL5x5. As Aequitas nails on the head, the Stronglift 5x5 program already includes 5x5 squats, 3 days a week, and as such, your legs, glutes and lower back will constantly be in a state of recovery. Adding a lot of sets of deadlifts on top of this will very likely hinder your progress, as you might never ...


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I'd recommend doing Yates rows if you can feel it in your back. Right now it sounds like your method of doing Pendlay rows is not working for you. Doing Yates rows will not affect StrongLifts negatively. People are being helpful suggesting how to fix your form to make Pendlays work for you, but frankly you need to weigh up the pros and cons of even going ...


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Or am I just retarded and the pronged belts don't give as much support as the lever belt? Opinions seem divided on whether a lever and prong can be made just as tight. Some say the lever can be put on tighter, but apparently using a rack as an anchor point when putting on the prong belt can get it just as tight as with a lever. I still have at least ...


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As others have mentioned it increases IAP. An effect of it is that it may also allow your core muscles to fire harder by giving your CNS a reason to reduce limits on certain muscles. It probably isn't cheating I disagree with the apparently common belief that wearing a belt will reduce the opportunity for the lower back to get stronger. Numerous studies ...


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I disagree with the Tom Gray's answer. Don't follow the meal plan. Everybody is different, and have different needs. You have to build a meal plan that can help you with your need. This meal plan can be perfect for someone, or (more likely) really inappropriate for someone who have some sportive activity. Just to add some advice for your problem : Don't ...


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As mentioned in yisrael's answer and Aequitas' comment, you're gonna need to track your calorie intake. Combining a caloric deficit by diet with exercise is going to be a lot easier than just doing one. Without exercise you may find that eating little enough for the deficit can leave you too hungry or make it hard to resist sneaking in some extra food, while ...


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In order to lose weight you need to be in a caloric deficit; meaning you expend more energy from the combination of your daily activity plus exercise than you eat. If you are not tracking both your intake and your output, you will have no way of knowing if you are doing 'enough' to lose weight. There are many calculators online that can assist you with ...


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I've often felt there were two aspects to using a weight belt. The first being the psychological sense of security that the belt provides. Belts make us feel “locked in” and ready to lift thus providing a positive framework to perform the lift. The second and more important aspect is the potential support that a belt provides thus reducing the ...


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In short - belt gives better stabilization. Why not to use it? Well, you wish to have great stabilization... You would like to use that muscles, not to support them. Is it cheating - since that is legal - it is not cheating. Same as wrist/knee stabilization, special pants. All that helps you lift higher values - if that is your target? On the other hand ...


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There's acceptable "grind" and unacceptable grind, and I don't trust novices to tell the difference. Someone in your position--which I assume means, a beginner doing a novice program with an unfamiliar exercise--should not try to make this distinction oneself, but rather get a trusted coach to review your form in person, or do an online form check using ...


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The barbell row is a beast. It depends how you are executing them. Are you stretching the back when you let the barbell down? By that I mean you should use the full range of motion. I would recommend the following: try to maintain a near 90° angle with your torso let the arms fully extend and your shoulder blades too... use a grip-width as you would do a ...


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That depends on your goals. For pure strength you should avoid going to failure or doing grinders, as soon as technique gets bad, stop there ex usually let 2 reps in the tank. For building some mass you can go to failure and should more then less and I would use some slightly lighter weight not to injure myself. You can imagine that your form will suffer ...


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So, firstly, its a difficult issue to find good information on, simply because bent arms or "pulling early" is such a common rookie mistake. Generally, bent arms are indicative that a lifter is trying to more or less reverse curl the bar into position RATHER than harnessing the explosion in the hips. That said, there are plenty of very accomplished lifters ...


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"Glenn Pendlay said, all Barbell Rows should be Pendlay Rows because it’s more effective." Upper-back: You must pull your shoulder-blades back at the top to get the bar to your chest. This works your broadest back muscle that give you a v-shape: your lats ((latisimus dorsi). It also works your traps, rear shoulders and all the small muscles of your ...


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Have a dive through the 5x5 website squat page here In summary, you don't count reps with bad form. If you complete a set of 5 with 1 bad form rep then you only record 4 for that set. This will cause you to repeat the same weight or de-load next session (automatically if you are using the app).


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Injuries will hinder your progress more than lifting lighter. Focus on technique if you want long term gains.


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Firstly your body can adapt to a lot of crazy things within limits. Now lifting every day applies differently to different lifts. Doing the olympic lifts everyday is a different beast to doing squats/bench/deads every day. In addition squatting everyday (getting popular nowadays) is again a different animal to deadlifting every day (which you may have ...


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I use this waistpack from Nike. It's literally just a small fanny pack. It's just big enough to fit my phone (Galaxy S6) comfortably but it can fit my wallet in it as well. I also keep my keys on a small carabiner, so I can clip them onto the waistband if I'm just walking around. I usually just have my headphones' wire behind me, down my back, and the ...


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I want to preface all of this by saying that this is from memory so a lot of this is sort of foggy. First, yes, a lot of the Bulgarian lifters were apparently on performance enhancing drugs and I believe many of them were banned from any sort of Olympic Weightlifting. Secondly, the Bulgarian method is effective because it takes advantage of the body's ...


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The immediate energy source for your muscles is adenosine triphosphate (ATP). When exerting force with a muscle it gets depleted (quickly) and when exhausted you fail to exert the same force. After 5 reps with the maximum weight you can do for 5 reps of some movement, a 6th rep fails. Fortunately, ATP can also get replenished relatively quickly. When being ...


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It's quite normal to feel "weak" on a ketogenic diet, at least compared to one with a normal amount of carbs in it. You need energy from either fat or carbs. Fat is stored for longer and the energy "lasts" longer(but spikes less), whereas carbs spike quite fast and drop off more steeply. From the sound of it, perhaps you aren't getting enough good fats in ...



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