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0

If you don't want to read all correct but lengthy (like reading a book) answers, I explain in points: you have to exercise 5 days a week, you can increase from 5 mins cardio to 1 hour compound/mix exercise, enjoy doing exercise, give extra reps to in exercise which you like the most. Rest mentally and physically, just don't think about goal for 2 days. ...


0

Wendler doesn't specify when conditioning should occur, just that it should occur. I don't think he thinks it matters. In fact, he calls you a "vag" if you do think it matters: From the book 5/3/1: I don’t care when or how you get this conditioning done, and I don’t care whether it happens on your off days or not. This only time this matters is ...


0

Matt Carlson's 5/3/1 variant Doing More With Less seems to be structured as Lifting, 3 days a week Calisthenics circuit Strength work Conditioning or running Running, 2-3 days a week: Calisthenics circuit Running His non-running, non-calisthenics conditioning work: the prowler or some of my conditioning circuits inspired by the CPAT (Candidate ...


5

I'm no expert, but I trained oly lifts for a while. My best power clean was 265lbs at 6'1", 190lbs. I can give you anecdotes and tips, for what they're worth. It takes quite a while to start getting comfortable with the clean. It took at least some months for me, possibly 3 or 4 before I started trying to progressively overload. I didn't want to go ...


6

General Advice When I was learning the lifts, my first step was always to read the entire Starting Strength chapter on that lift, then re-skim it the next day I was doing the lift. The book is quite dense, and multiple reads enhance its utility greatly. I strongly recommend reading and rereading that chapter of the book. Make time for it. As to the power ...


4

I had a tough time learning cleans, but they're really awesome to master and unlocking the olympic lifts feels like getting accepted into a barbell fraternity. As a frame of reference, watch this youtube on a slow motion of clean and jerk. I have a hard time doing the explosive pull (the third step when you are effectively doing an upright row). Do I ...


0

In community college gym I was taught to do 10 to 12 repetitions at 70% of max lifting weight. That is, if I could lift 100 lbs once, I should life 70 lbs 10 to 12 repetitions. Once I start doing 14 repetitions because the weight has become "lighter" I will add weight until 10 to 12 repetitions is what I can do without too much strain. It was suggested that ...


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I'd make it a little more straight forward and say that you should increase your weights according the program you're following. Effective training programs have already done the math on volume/strength increases set against sufficient recovery. Trying to eye-ball that is terribly inefficient and unless you nail it will end up with results that either: a) ...


0

My suggestion is that do the weight you can actually lift, add more until you can lift it for 12 reps easily, reps and sets are more important than weights. Keeping your form right would also help a lot.


1

What are your goals? If your goal is strength, then I'd recommended starting with a weight you can lift for five reps. From there, follow the pithy saying "If you can do eight, add more weight".


0

It is a good question, to which answer often distinguishes between progression and / or potential injury.From my own experience, over years I've learned to not to increase weight if I am unable to do, depending on trained muscle group at least 8-10 repetitions.This became a rule of my workouts and a safeguard against an injury for many years now.


3

If I'm focusing on challenging myself in lifting, I'm confident my form was excellent, and I have my recovery dialed in—my sleep and food are of a high quality, I feel good, no injuries—I may add weight in the expectation that my body will recover and get stronger by the next workout. If lifting is a secondary priority, or I'm not sure how good my form was ...


0

Board presses are a supplement to regular bench presses. It's not so much a matter of pros and cons (as if you were choosing one over the other) as it is knowing under what circumstances board presses can be a useful tool: Emphasize Lockout - If the weak point on your bench press is the lockout, then board presses can provide focused work on that range of ...


1

In general, doctors such especially GPs and those who do not specialize in sports medicine, are often more conservative and will side with caution. (Incidentally, scoliosis isn't the only condition where weightlifting may be discouraged. I have GERD and my gastroenterologist has also advised me to stop weightlifting as both weight gain and the act of lifting ...


1

I did some Google searches, and I thought I might as well post what I found out as an answer. In addition to dumbbell magnets, there are also wrist weights and weighted gloves.


1

In addition to Plate-Mates, a length of heavy metal chain might be a good solution.


7

You can buy dumbbell magnets to attach to the head of the dumbbells. I've typically seen 1.25lb magnets, though I suppose you can probably find 2.5 lb magnets as well.


2

You are currently placing a pulling load on a muscle system and seeing which part of the system fails first. It's easy to forget that strength training involves more than training just the muscle. It also involves load on the tendons, ligaments, and bones. Since you are experiencing what feels like inflammation of the tendons, it seems logical that the ...


1

More than a year has passed. This is what eventually worked for me: isometric exercises with tennis balls. I built up slowly each third day, from two to four sets of five to ten "reps", where a "rep" here means five seconds squeezing hard a tennis ball in each hand. I recommend that approach to anyone in the same situation as me. Maybe it worked well ...


4

Six months is really not a long time. You can get to advanced level in 2-3 years (with proper programming) and spend six months just to put on 5-10kg to your lifts after that. By taking six months off, you might miss out on maybe 3-4 pounds of muscle gain. Obviously you don't want to go backwards on your legs, so keep in mind the detraining rates outlined ...


2

The other answers from Dave and Eric cover the various physiological reasons for resets, being overtraining, rest, etc. I won't go into that. Instead, I'll address the often overlooked psychological factor. Every time you plateau, you fail. You are failing to get to that next weight and bypass the roadblock. Sometimes this is just a speed bump, and next ...


1

Missing a given weight for 3 workouts in a row is a symptom of a significant (though not major) problem. Maybe you're not doing a good enough job at recovery, or maybe you added weight in bigger chunks than was appropriate, or maybe your body simply isn't getting stronger fast enough. Dropping 10% feels like a step backward, but really it gives you some room ...


1

My guess would be that you're bumping into overtraining. The increases prescribed in the program are based on maximizing the stress->recovery->adaptation cycle. If you're not adapting (able to hit your numbers) then you're either over-training or under-training. On intermediate programs if you don't hit your numbers (and you've been lifting on schedule ...


0

No. If a person takes steroids the amount of mass/muscle production in the body increase but to shape the mass/muscle keep it growing in the proper place and required place It's very important to workout which hapless to push muscle as required


4

Your family's concern is misplaced. Deadlifting 80kg is perfectly reasonable, as is deadlifting 100kg, 120kg, or 160kg. What's dangerous with lifting weights isn't the amount lifted, but whether you're advancing carefully with additional weight, being judicious with one-rep-max attempts, warming up sufficiently, managing minor injuries, and acting ...


1

You get stronger, and likely bigger if you eat more. Anything more is speculation. This is a overly general question and can't really be answered concisely. There are many forms of pursuing lifting - for competition in Weightlifting or Powerlifting, for Aesthetics - Bodybuilding, for general health/fun, or other reasons too numerous to list. Any sport ...


1

From the limited research I've done on this I concluded that you'll still keep some of the muscle gained but not necessarily the same mass. The idea is the steroids increase the number of muscle fibres. It is one of the reasons why some are against athletes that have tested positive being allowed to compete even after serving their bans. It could be argued ...



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