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10

Your spine and shoulders should be fine, the biggest risk is to the knees. In particular, running with any kind of weights (vest, ruck sack, etc.) puts much more stress on your knees. If you have bad running form, it's even more of a problem. Some quick points to think about: Make sure you have the right shoes for your total weight including the ruck ...


7

Ankle weights will affect how your legs move as you run, and will likely cause injury. Weighted belts won't change your biomechanics much, but a greater impact can lead to injury as well. Even if you accelerate to a sprint, weighted ankles will keep your legs from moving normally. The weighted belt, on the other hand, won't affect you much at all in a ...


7

If you can't increase the weight on the bar, then you have to settle for moving the bar faster (good for strength and power), reducing rest periods between sets (good for conditioning and endurance), increasing the number of reps per set (good for endurance, conditioning, and hypertrophy), increasing the number of sets (good for hypertrophy, conditioning, ...


5

The answer with all questions of this manner is "It Depends". Specifically, the factors that influence the decision are: Are you competing in a strength sport? If so: How close to the contest date are you? Is the squat a contested lift (usually only Powerlifting, but occasionally this applies to Strongman as well) Your individual lever lengths and ...


5

First we need to understand what strength is and what types of strength there are (Ross Enamait describes it nicely on this page http://rosstraining.com/blog/strength-training-for-fighters/): However, he is talking about fighters and their need for strength but the concept is the same. Maximal Strength – Maximal strength is defined as the amount of force ...


4

mitro's answer is really good, but I'd like to add on it. It's going to be hard to really build strength without weight, but there are a few things you can consider in the meantime: Volume progression - good strength/powerlifting programs (Sheiko, Juggernaut, etc.) use volume as a main training stimulus rather than intensity. By increasing your training ...


3

Yes. Generally speaking, anything that utilizes your ATP/Creatine Phosphate system will increase both size and strength. The threshold for that system begins at around 70% of your one-rep max. That said, if strength is your only goal, you would train at rep ranges that purely utilize this system, rather than ranges that also utilize the glycolytic system: ...


3

Ankle weights will affect how you move your legs and put additional strain on your knees, which isn't a great idea. (i.e: it's a terrible idea) Weighted belt is a better way to add weight, but will be rather uncomfortable. A weighted jacket provides better weight distribution. However, I would challenge the reason why you want to add weight while running. ...


3

I'd eat about double what you describe if I were running and lifting and wanted to gain weight. I'd particularly eat more protein: eggs at breakfast (in addition, not instead) and meat for dinner. I'd consider a nightcap of milk or yogurt to top myself off. I'd also consider not running so much if I wanted to gain weight. I'd also drink full-fat milk and ...


3

Based on you not knowing what your shoulder muscles are called, I'm going to take a guess that you're not really doing any shoulder exercises to speak of, or at least over-emphasizing your bench press. A good rule of thumb for shoulder health is to overhead press at least as often, and more like twice as often, as you bench press. Additionally, you'll want ...


3

Just speaking for me personally, I find it pretty impossible to get my hips to go below my knee if I'm not at least shoulders-wide stance. I would go as wide as you need to in order to: Achieve depth. Have your knees out and pointing where your toes are. Be able to truly use your glutes. Be able to keep your weight on your heels. Even on a deadlift, ...


3

This is one of those questions where the actual answer boils down to your desire for variation in your exercise routine. While there are many anecdotal reasons to vary your squat stance, there aren’t that many actual studies to recommend variation as a key to squatting success. There was, however, a biomechanical study done in 2001: A three-dimensional ...


3

Short answer Don't worry about it. Longer answer Weight belts are NOT going to give you any problems unless you pack on an obscene amount of weights. And this is a catch-22 anyway, because the weight you'd need to strap to yourself is way more than you'd ever be able to do pullups or dips with. You should always opt for a belt which can be tightened ...


3

Yes, but it depends on how advanced you are. If you've been lifting for several years, you'll generally need to focus more and more on one aspect of training in order to see results. If you're just starting out, you'll get stronger/faster/bigger/leaner doing practically any kind of weightlifting. But as those 'newbie gains' taper off, most lifters find they ...


3

Two of the programs with a lot of following are Starting Strength (website / book) and Strong Lifts 5x5 (website). Whichever program you follow, the Starting Strength book is worth its weight in gold. Both of these programs are built for novices, which should be defined by strength standards, not personal opinions. They focus on compound barbell exercises. ...


3

Please do not make the mistake in becoming a 'template hopper', just stick to your SL 5x5 program you started and stay with it for as long as you see progress. You will gain muscle and even loose fat if your diet is clean. Dont look at what the others may have done and use their regime as everybody is different. What works for him might not work for you. ...


2

There are a lot of answers floating around on here that pertain to you, but foremost I would point out that there is documented and peer reviewed evidence that strength training is effective for fat loss (more so than most cardio), so don't give it up. If you strip things down to basics, if you're adding strength and in a calorie deficit (starting from an ...


2

Looks like you don't have the strength to handle that weight. Most likely a better way to go about it would be starting with a basic strength program until your muscles are strong enough to deal with the load. Things like heavy squats and deadlifts (starting strength type of program), combined with unloaded running and uphill sprints. If you have access to ...


2

The physics of this can be boiled down to Newton's 3rd law; For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. This is the physical law which dictates that if I push you, you automatically push me back. The reason why you fall and I don't, is that my stance was more balanced (I was leaning into into it because I was ready for it, as the ...


2

If you have trouble with the close-grip bench press, but you want to target the pectoralis muscles more intensively, I'd suggest you implement some flies into your program instead, while working on your possible injury. The chest fly can be done with dumbells or cables, and can be done standing up, or lying down on a bench. Alternatively there are machines ...


2

Both can increase the risk of injury. The belt will put pressure on knees and the weighted ankle will put pressure on hips. It can be done without injuries if controlled carefully. Both can help developing force, but because of the risks, other methods are preferred. Running with extra weight leads to muscle mass increase. The benefits could be higher ...


2

Kettlebells are a great way to supplement bodyweight work and to start to move into external resistance training. But they don't really work as a substitute for a barbell. You must take the kettlebell on its own terms. How is a kettlebell different from a barbell? Well, you can't get as heavy a resistance out of a kettlebell. I've heard of hundred-pound ...


2

One thing that can happen as you bring your hands in is the tendency to shift your shoulders forward to compensate for being in an unnatural position. That tendency is something that you much not fall in to. Keep in mind: You have a hand placement that allows you to lift the most weight Every inch closer or farther apart will diminish your ability ...


1

Your parents are wise to supervise what you are doing to help you prevent injuring your body. An injury can be for life, so it is best to prevent them, by learning proper form and having expert instruction. Your parents are aware of your maturity level and how much they can trust you to follow your coach's instruction and how serious you are about safety and ...


1

Yeah, but not much. Training for size will guarantee muscular endurance because you're working on exhausting the muscles in order to grow. This will increase your strength, but not much. For example, if you're performing 4 sets of 15 reps of bicep curls with a 30-lb dumbbell, you should be able to perform 2 sets of 5-10 reps with a 35-lb dumbbell. That's ...


1

I think you're referring to the suitcase deadlift. They are different, for a few reasons. You'll never get to real barbell deadlift weights, unless you use two barbells (one in each hand). For someone working up a 500lb deadlift, even adjusting a bit, you're not going to be able to find 200lb kettlebells or 200lb dumbells anywhere short of a specialty ...


1

I would stay away from isolation workouts and go to compound workouts since other bigger muscles can help out in the routines. Types of exercises (dumbbell): Bench Press, Incline Bench Press (go light on this), Flyes Types of exercises (cables): Seated rows, lat-pull (use wide grip so you don't use too much shoulder), Cable Cross overs, cable flyes For ...


1

The biggest expense variable with weights is shipping, since you're basically moving heavy objects around in the mail. As such, you can tend to get better prices by visiting a nearby fitness retailer that has their weights showing up by freight and the shipping cost is distributed amongst a lot of products. Additionally, used fitness equipment is all over ...


1

If your goal is general fitness then you're doing plenty of running, walking, and swimming, but your deadlift is quite light. Sixteen reps is also a lot for the deadlift. If it's possible to use more weight but fewer reps per set, do that. 60kg to 100kg should be entirely doable for you within a few months. Other ways to get good use out of your limited ...


1

The most important element of any program is that it meets you where you are. If you're somewhat athletic and without major mobility problems, Starting Strength and 5/3/1 are two good choices among many. The key element here, in my opinion, is to avoid unnecessary aspects of bodybuilding, to develop consistency, and to work towards mastery of basic ...



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