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1

If your goal is general fitness then you're doing plenty of running, walking, and swimming, but your deadlift is quite light. Sixteen reps is also a lot for the deadlift. If it's possible to use more weight but fewer reps per set, do that. 60kg to 100kg should be entirely doable for you within a few months. Other ways to get good use out of your limited ...


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I asked this question a year ago and it got blocked/edited/removed! I figured out on my own after reading some books on running form, or at least an idea of why not to do this: The energy lost due to carrying weight like the two other answers said. The weights seem to spread out my stride while slowing down my cadence. A similar gain in stride seemed ...


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You've tagged your post with bodyweight-exercises, you can look at this great plan here, as for a guide, I suggest you go through the /r/bodyweight FAQ. If you want more information on exercises and training, check out exrx.net, which is great source for a lot of training and nutrition information.


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I can't think of a definition of "Bible of working out" better than the marvellous, free site EXRX. As a suggestion, you may want to start by having a look at their Beginner's page, or go directly to Exercise Instruction and learn about designing your own workout. A much simpler, yet very nice source of honest information about working out at home is ...


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Check out Muscle and Strength. They have articles specifically for fat loss. https://www.muscleandstrength.com/workouts/fat-loss


3

Yes. Generally speaking, anything that utilizes your ATP/Creatine Phosphate system will increase both size and strength. The threshold for that system begins at around 70% of your one-rep max. That said, if strength is your only goal, you would train at rep ranges that purely utilize this system, rather than ranges that also utilize the glycolytic system: ...


1

Yeah, but not much. Training for size will guarantee muscular endurance because you're working on exhausting the muscles in order to grow. This will increase your strength, but not much. For example, if you're performing 4 sets of 15 reps of bicep curls with a 30-lb dumbbell, you should be able to perform 2 sets of 5-10 reps with a 35-lb dumbbell. That's ...


3

Yes, but it depends on how advanced you are. If you've been lifting for several years, you'll generally need to focus more and more on one aspect of training in order to see results. If you're just starting out, you'll get stronger/faster/bigger/leaner doing practically any kind of weightlifting. But as those 'newbie gains' taper off, most lifters find they ...



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