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Being able to touch the toes depends mainly on two things: hamstring flexibility body proportions (relative length of legs, torso, and arms) It is not possible to change body proportions, so, to reach the toes, someone with longer legs and shorter torso/arms will need to have more flexibility in the hamstrings. It is possible for anyone to reach that ...


4

Most "guys in the gym" have absolutely no idea what they are doing. There are certain exercises that you can really do pretty much every day for the rest of your life with good results. If you were using a lot of weight, you might want to do them every other day. That's the premise behind most strength training plans: they pick the most valuable barbell ...


3

It's possible, but I wouldn't call it "likely" in the sense that "this is the most probably reason". The most likely reason is simply lack of flexibility. If one, over a longer period of time, works on their flexibility, most people (barring certain "disabilities") will be able to reach their toes, or even palm the floor.


3

What you’re describing is Exercise Adaptation, or, “training plateau”. It’s a common response to exercise stress. From the National Academy of Sports… The principle of adaptation refers to the process of the body getting accustomed to a particular exercise or training program through repeated exposure. As the body adapts to the stress of the new ...


1

The general answer towards rep ranges has been written about previously, and it's fairly proven. But since you're asking about squats in particular, I'd offer this up: The Madcow 5x5 (non Olympic lift version of the Bill Starr 5x5) program has a set of eight reps to finish up the intensity day. So even on classic "5x5" programs, you'll still run into reps ...


1

Personally, I think doing many reps of squats is so tough on your general endurance that the endurance will be the limiting factor, not muscle strength in the muscles I want to target, it will also make you much more tired during the rest of the workout, which is bad if it's part of a whole-body workout. Also, deadlifts, and to some extent, squats, are so ...


1

Ok, day-to-day strength. What you want, or rather, what you want to avoid, is the kind of exercise some people do to look strong, i.e. workout arms, abs and chest. There's nothing wrong with strong arms, but strong arms don't do much good without a good back. No matter what workout you do, even if it's rather light, I'd recommend not doing it two days in a ...


1

It sounds like you've done a lot of solid research. Your exercise selection and daily schedule looks sound. I'd personally switch incline bench with pull-ups, because 1) I have no desire to incline bench and 2) pull-ups would balance pulling with pushing exercises, which is desirable for a number of reasons, including shoulder health. Your program's ...


1

I'd advise against doing it every day. Instead, every-other day would provide your muscles with enough restitution to actually progress. Keep in mind that the "every-other day" part is more of a rule-of-thumb, but restitution is crucial to gaining strength. If your numbers are a goal, and not something you can already do, then it looks alright. The problem ...


1

First off, excellent work on taking charge of your fitness. If weight loss is a big goal, make sure you double your efforts in the diet and nutrition area. Eating 500 calories is very easy, but burning 500 calories via exercise is very hard. As an example, an average blueberry muffin has 426 calories. Meanwhile, at 300lbs, you would need to run for two ...


1

I would suggest maintaining a healthy diet and doing some plyometrics in addition to your running. When I began to do plyometrics before competing in track meets, I started to see pretty significant results considering the short amount of time needed for plyometrics. It's also a great way to stretch before physical activity so you're less injury prone. I ...



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