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7

There's a very common misconception here. Many people think that certain types of exercise will give you one body shape or the other. The reasoning is (more or less explicitly), that since power lifters are bulky, working out like a power lifter will make you bulky, and since dancers are fit and lean, "working out" like a dancer will make you fit and lean. ...


7

Squat - 110 lbs BP - 75 lbs Row - 80 lbs OHP - 55 lbs DL - 165 lbs As you can see the barbell row and the OHP are lagging behind. Your row is stronger than your bench press which is actually really good, I think your numbers look terrific to be honest. Just keep on the program. The overhead press is probably one of the toughest lifts out there. ...


6

The reality is there are 3 or 4 ways to expand your chest visually in order: Chest Muscles Lat Muscles Shrink Waist Enlarge Shoulders A good starting point will be Dumbbell Bench Press (generally gets better range of motion than barbell), Dips, Barbell Rows, and Flies and/or Pec Deck if you have one. For some depending on your mechanics Dumbbell Bench ...


4

If he went from 135 to 405 in five months, is doing full range (or even partial, really) and has gotten huge, there's one answer. Your friend's "secret workout" is anabolic steroids, probably injecting testosterone once a week. I should add: your friend is definitely lifting a lot as well and working out hard, but there's simply no naturally occurring ...


3

Workout program First off, I hope you're doing more than just the 5 exercises in the article you linked to. Those exercises are indeed a good set of exercises for the upper back, but good posture is only achieved through exercising the entire body! Intensity and volume parameters When deciding your set/rep ranges, one often asks "do I want to focus on ...


3

Yes. Generally speaking, anything that utilizes your ATP/Creatine Phosphate system will increase both size and strength. The threshold for that system begins at around 70% of your one-rep max. That said, if strength is your only goal, you would train at rep ranges that purely utilize this system, rather than ranges that also utilize the glycolytic system: ...


3

Yes, but it depends on how advanced you are. If you've been lifting for several years, you'll generally need to focus more and more on one aspect of training in order to see results. If you're just starting out, you'll get stronger/faster/bigger/leaner doing practically any kind of weightlifting. But as those 'newbie gains' taper off, most lifters find they ...


2

Ultra-runners end up with a very efficient fat-burning metabolism and a very good idea of what food works for them. Fundamentally, you physically cannot take in enough calories to keep up with the energy expended so your body must switch to burning fat. (There is a maximum gastric emptying rate; combine that with the need for the fluids to be at the same ...


2

There's a swedish runner called Rune Larsson (2:18 boston marathon), had the swedish record on 100 km (6:43:36) for 22 years, ran 374 km in 48 hours, 263 km in 24 hours, basically a very experienced ultra marathon runner. His take on food is that most runners are too scared of trying things outside the norm, you don't have to eat enormous amounts of pasta ...


1

Smolov Jr. is possibly the best bench routine for pure numbers. Prilepin's Chart is also famously adapted by a number of big strength training routines (such as Westside Barbell). There is also something called the Power Matrix that a friend of mine used to get his bench to 365 lbs (@180 lbs) in under a year. If your friend progressed linearly, that ...


1

As others have said, this looks like a reasonable routine. But... I would say that it looks like you're halfway to doing circuit-training. Have you thought of going to a class for a few weeks? It will be hard at first, but it'll certainly help with the motivation as just doing this sort of thing at home on your own can be a grind. Besides, going to some ...


1

If you want to lose belly fat, then I recommend doing some more cardio (some form of running). However, in order to get lean, this workout seems just fine if you stay committed. If you are looking to add more muscle mass, try adding some more free weights in there. Good luck!


1

Make sure to eat enough, you're very light for that height, thin people often have a hard time eating enough to add weight, but when they do, they tend to add lean mass and strength.


1

As long as your form is good, then you are more unlikely to injure yourself. For rows, some 'body English' is fine to help drive progressions, especially since it is not a competitive movement, so being strict with momentum isn't inherently necessary. If doing Pendlay rows (as advocated by Mehdi), you can have a bit of thoracic extension to aid with ...


1

If your goal is general fitness then you're doing plenty of running, walking, and swimming, but your deadlift is quite light. Sixteen reps is also a lot for the deadlift. If it's possible to use more weight but fewer reps per set, do that. 60kg to 100kg should be entirely doable for you within a few months. Other ways to get good use out of your limited ...


1

Do I need to change the routine? No. So long you are able to progress in weights / reps / sets, you do not need to change your routine. With that said, this is called progressive overload. So long you are progressing, your workout is pretty much effective for you. You are doing pretty well except for your 3rd week. So what you could do is continue doing 70 ...


1

Yeah, but not much. Training for size will guarantee muscular endurance because you're working on exhausting the muscles in order to grow. This will increase your strength, but not much. For example, if you're performing 4 sets of 15 reps of bicep curls with a 30-lb dumbbell, you should be able to perform 2 sets of 5-10 reps with a 35-lb dumbbell. That's ...



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