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Based on the information provided and your name, I'm going to make some assumptions (required to provide a wild guess at maintenance Calories). My assumptions used to fill in the blanks for a calorie calculator are: Female (based on name, body weight, adjectives used in the question) About 25 years old (default on the calculator, calorie requirements go ...


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There is a concept known as "training stress". When you put stress on your system and then give your body time to recover, you will improve. When you started, it was easy for you to put stress on your system, but over time, your body adapted, and now you only put enough stress on your system to stay where you are. The solution is to change up what you are ...


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In regards to before the workout, you will want to eat something; the question is whether to eat a full breakfast or a smaller snack. The Mayo Clinic recommends to leave enough time in the morning to finish your breakfast an hour before you begin your workout, and if that time allotment fits into your schedule, eat a normal to small sized breakfast. If ...


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There's no one specific type of routine for getting "ripped". It's generally agreed in the bobybuilding circles that the formula for getting ripped is an increase in exercise volume with a corresponding decrease in calories. Each part of this equation should be done gradually. For example, remove 250 to 500 calories from your total caloric intake over a ...


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Buy Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe. Read it and follow the program exactly, adding assistance exercises such as curls only on the Friday.You will have to bulk so leave the abs on the sideline for a few months and just cut afterwards. You will get big doing this, trust me.


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I like everyone's answer, but you don't have to work your abs and calves every day. It takes a lot of time to work on them, and doing it with a day of rest in between will help improve your core without possibly over-training. A lot of articles that you can read will display the human anatomy and give you the ability to realize that your tricep is the bigger ...


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First point I see is that you should set your expectations well. At 15, your body is just beginning to be at a place where you can see muscular development. Everybody is a little different, so it may be a year or two before you see any appreciable muscle mass being built. However, keep at it. In all honesty, what you have outlined is too much variation ...


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Low carb is indeed a very good basis to start of from. Its however not directly suitable for doing high intensity workouts. Your body is perfectly capable of producing sugar from fat and protein and will happily store that in your liver and muscles to fuel short bursts of strength. Ones your stores are exausted however, your body won't be able to produce new ...


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Looks prety decent, but I'm worried about the granola. It depends greatly on the brand, but granola can have an extremely high amount of sugar in it. If you want to build core strength, make sure you don't under eat. Make sure to get sufficient protein (approximately your fat free body weight in kg times 2.5 in grams), and most of your remaining callories ...


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If you're eating plenty of vegetables then a multi-vitamin is a waste of money in general, especially with your level of activity. You will just end up passing them out in your urine, it will be bright yellow though so that is a noticeable effect. In terms of protein shakes, I used to take them a lot in my early training career but have since found that ...


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+1 zero carbs kills your energy and your mental capacity/health (your brain is the largest consumer of glucose). In the short term this is OK for gains like boot camp weight loss or training for an event, but it's no way to live well. Avoid the soda and candy, but make room in your life for "good carbs" (longer chain) like almonds, sweet potatoes, kidney ...


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My nutrition is standard low carb diet (about 40% protein / 60% fats, I eat cake/sweets max 2 times a week no more than 100g). Ding ding ding! We've found the culprit. Your body relies on carbohydrate for most of its energy. If you go low-carb, you're relying on transitioning from using carbs to ketosis, where you're using fats. Many people report ...



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