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(This may be a different slant than the one you are asking for, and if so I apologize, but anyway…) As long as you are doing something, you will be able to improve your general fitness and you will gradually notice yourself feeling and looking healthier. Particularly in your case where you are working so diligently and with so many movements, there will be ...


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The short of it: No. Absolutely not ideal. If you want the best results, leg day is the most important day. This is the day where you use the largest bulk of muscles (and not just legs either). How to improve your approach The biggest issue here is that you're working only your upper body, but forgetting legs and lower back. Legs and lower back are what ...


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"I've heard many people complain about not losing weight after a week" These are the same people who jump from program to program, expecting quick results. They're also the kind to jump on the latest weight loss fad/bandwagon. Don't be that guy :) "I've also heard people not seeing/feeling a difference after a month or so" These guys have the ...


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The question is quite generic (no objectives on train or diet given). So, I'll answer based on my experience. When I want to cut (lose fat) I give a 3 week buffer period before changing the plan (diet or train) if not seeing the desired results. For instance, you are aiming to lose 1 lb of weight per week. But, it is common for the weight to fluctuate ...


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It's a pretty broad question and all I can offer up is anecdotal knowledge, but I'll take a stab at it. If I really dial in my diet, walk a couple of hours each day, and keep lifting, I can drop about 1lb of fat per week. I think that's "noticeable" on someone who otherwise stays pretty lean. More simply, a skinny person losing 10 pounds looks a lot ...


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If your goal is at least in part to get stronger, you're best off exhausting your beginner gains with a beginner program. You already have experience with StrongLifts, so it shouldn't be hard to get back into it. Just start back at ~50% of your 5rm for each lift, or take the Starting Strength approach and use a week to test your current lifts and start 30-40 ...


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First, just thought I'd mention that it says when joining this stack exchange that questions should not be opinion based. That said, I usually hang mine on a fold up clothes hanger, or over a railing outside. If these aren't options, you could just rinse them in the sink or toss them in a fresh bucket of water.


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First of let's get the terminology out of the way. When you write "set", do you actually mean "number of muscles trained"? What one set really mean is that you lift and put down the weight repeatedly until you can't anymore and have to rest. That's one set and if that's all you do per muscle in a week, you're not doing nearly enough work. Or do you mean ...


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There is no such thing as a 'correct' routine. Workout plans should be made according to targets, and knowledge of how to hit those targets. The problem is that many different people will suggest different plans to hit those targets. This is because there is some disagreement whether any approach is sure to work for all people. For this reason there are some ...


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Working out a muscle once per week is actually common, but you need to put a large volume of training on it. 9 sets of 10 per muscle per week is a rule of thumb I've read, and it applies to both a 3-split and whole-body.


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Actually, gymles training is a trend since a few years. MOre and more informations get spread throu books, dvds an the internet about this kind of trining, under the names of odyweight excercises, calisthenics.... A few informations to start (and without spending money) would be names like: Paul Wade (Convict conditioning) Al Kavadlo (pushing the limits) ...


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Is this satisfactory enough to build muscles up? Provided you are in a caloric surplus(eating more than your TDEE, by adding 100~500 cal to your TDEE), then yes. Also since you are running, make sure you are able to consume the calories you lose from running. Consider doing your workout with 3~4 sets(up to you to make the changes here) for every 3~15 reps. ...


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Actually, this answer can vary. If you are lifting 3 days in a row and are doing only upper body as you say in your comment and are working on the same muscle groups day after day, then your muscles are probably not getting enough time to rest to grow back stronger in between your workouts. However, if you are doing the bench press on Friday, curls on ...


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There are numerous body building programs out there that you can move into. In the beginning, I'd recommended sticking with a good compound strength training program. The one you mentioned seems to fit that category nicely. I'd additionally recommend sticking with it until you (at least) hit the intermediate strength standards on your compound lifts. The ...


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First up - I'll present you 2 scenarios: Ever seen the guy at the gym who can do a 120 kg deadlift, squat 150 kg and bench-press 100kg for 8 reps? Yet this same person has a pot-belly and double-chin - just dripping with fat. Why? This particular person eats a couple of double cheese burgers after every workout, eating chapatis, rice and fatty foods ...


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Before the workout it is not very recommended for it to be something heavy. It should be a light snack 30-60 minutes before the workout. I got here two videos with good examples of things you can eat: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vVY0wZdrHU https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2h0i1ZEOeyc So mostly complex-carbs to give the needed energy to the body, try to ...


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As JohnP said. Yes! I would like to add if you are stacking days that it may be wise to switch between primary muscle groups on alternating days. Especially when starting back. It may be tempting to get full body workouts each day since you have only the 3 days, but it could lead to injury. If it were me. I would alternate the primary muscle groups on day ...


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Yes. Any exercise is more effective than no exercise. Depending on how much you used to lift, it will come back quicker than it would in an untrained person. Part of the lifting process is neural adaptation as well as other physiological adaptations that don't really disappear. It will still take a while to get back to where you were, and you will still ...


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I have a few suggestions for your workout plan based on the information you have provided: Muscles: Your back needs much more than deadlifts, chins, and shrugs. You should concentrate on pull ups instead of chin ups (probably wide grip, get the teres major involved, which you don't hit with anything else). Maybe a dumbbell pullover. I would definitely add ...


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You should use a real strength training program with proven results. You probably aren't eating enough calories, and probably not enough protein. Your body needs to recover. Especially if you get on a better program, your caloric needs will go up a lot. I would advise staying away from body building routines in general: they're a terrific way to get ...



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