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1

First let me say I haven't used a standing desk, however I'm in the software development field and know where you're coming from with sitting long hours. I'm also a personal trainer and see a lot of clients with bad backs due to poor posture from sitting long hours. A standing desk will help you lose a few calories, however I cant vouch for how many and if ...


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I wrote a beginners guide to calisthenics on my site a couple of months ago. (Edit to add the workout) The basic format is 5 sets x 5 reps of the following exercises: Incline Push-ups Inverted Rows Bodyweight Squats Lying Leg Raises Short Bridges However if you can do chin-ups you're possibly a bit ahead of this. I do recommend you train for bridges ...


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It gets referenced a lot, but for good reason: check out Mark Rippetoe's Starting Strength. The book and the program is, from my prospective, the most effective short and long term path to human strength. Whether you decide to be a Rippetoe fan for the rest of your life is up to you, but the things you learn from it and the path it puts you on really can be ...


3

Days off from lifting, known as "rest days", are designed to let your body heal from the damage you do during training. Oddly enough, the more progress you make in strength training the less frequently you can train at maximum because you get very good at damaging your body. Putting it another way, the cumulative exercise (a.k.a. damage) a trained athlete ...


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Usually this would be called an active rest day, and is something that I find very effective. I lift 6 days a week then do cardio whether it be riding my bike, jogging, running, or soccer drills. I find it quite helpful. It gives your muscles time to recover but you are still getting your daily dose of exercise. As you said, it is important to avoid using ...


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J.T. Hurley's comments about having protein available for muscle growth to occur can absolutely NOT be overstated. If you're intentions for working out are to gain muscle mass and increase your overall strength, you would be doing yourself a tremendous disservice by not having plenty of protein, calories, and water readily available before, during, and after ...


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I agree that working out on an empty stomach will not damage your muscles, but if I may offer my personal experience, working out on an empty stomach is no good....and obviously training when you are stuffed is also no good, unless you want to make yourself vomit. The best thing would be to have a carb rich meal about 2 hours before working out, and then go ...


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The short answer is no. The long answer is maybe. The basic "model" of the body's energy supply is that it holds a certain amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood if the number gets too high, it binds the blood sugar with insulin and stores it in fat cells. If the number gets too low, the body uses glucagon to un-bind the sugar and return it to usability in ...


2

An typical example of my current diet after my lifestyle changes is: Breakfast: Cornflakes, or a breakfast pot with red berries, fat free yoghurt and granola Lunch: Water and soup or fresh salad chicken and humous wrap made fresh. Dinner: Stir fry or chicken and veg and potatoes Trade out the processed food for more whole food. Lower ...


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If you wanted to continue with push up/pull up's also, a lot of people have found gains supplementing their normal workout routines with a PLP routine. Starting at 10 reps each, do your push ups, lunge, pull ups, and each day increment the number of reps by one. So "Day One" do 10 pushups, 10 pull ups, 10 lunges (each leg), "Day Two" do 11 of each, "Day ...



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