New answers tagged

-1

You can refer to the following video for demonstration of THE BIG 5 WORKOUT for home. I don't know if the exercises can improve the aerobic level.


1

Possibly with some bodyweight exercises, though I'd recommend against it. Having a quick look into the "Big 5 Workout", it seems like a standard HIT program, so performing one set to absolute failure. The key word there is "absolute". If you're performing an exercise to muscular failure, then your form goes all to hell. If you're performing an upper body ...


4

The Big 5 workout consists of these exercises (or rather categories thereof). Upper body pull. This is a horizontal pull. Getting some dumbbells that can be plate-loaded would allow you to do dumbbell rows, but for good strength development you'd end up with weights that aren't very practical for dumbbells, and a seated row or barbell rows would be better. ...


0

The simple rule is this: Replenish the fluid you lose. It's worrying to see gymmers sipping on electral or glucose water when your body doesn't need the electrolytes or calories they contain. Drinking glucose water sends your blood glucose levels into a tizzy, pushing you towards a mild addiction to sugar. You need it only if you play an outdoor sport like ...


1

How important is nutrient or meal timing? Under most circumstances and in the grand scheme of things, it's not critical. Of far greater importance is hitting your calorie, macro- and micro-nutrient needs over the course of the day. After that, consistency and commitment should be applied to an appropriate workout plan that suits your performance and/or body ...


1

First lets set aside that you haven't shared your goals and have in mind that a pre-workout whey protein shake can't fix general poor or low protein diet. The important part for me here is that you are working out early in the morning, after not having consumed any protein (or food) for a long period of time. Your insulin levels are low, cortisol is high - ...


3

You don't "start over" unless you stop lifting for several months. The point is to always be stronger for the rest of your life. The point is not to lift the weight and then pretend you can't lift the heavy weight. If you miss a rep on one exercise, it doesn't affect the others. They track separately. If you miss one rep of, say, a squat, then try that ...


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Quick answer: No, not a good routine, you probably won't get much stronger or bigger. I recommend HST training and eating 30g of protein within 30 minutes of each time you lift, and lift every other day. You will gain strength and mass and will not plateau.


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There's nothing in particular regarding the timing of your protein consumption that will make any significant difference according to our current understanding. Keep in mind however, that some people experience minor gastric distress from whey protein and this could interfere with training. (Farts. I'm talking about farts.)


0

Disclaimer: I am not sponsored by this site. I want to plug Jefit. Its a App (free) which has some paid for features depending on the level of information feedback you want. The main benefit is that it has images of the exercises you want to do, records your data and saves it online and guides you through whatever workout you select. Pros: Select from ...


1

Recording the sets, reps and weight is enough for a lot of people. If you want to make the most out of this tool you can also use your training log to write out the following things: Use it to set goals for the week. Progression happens via knowing what you did last week and doing it a bit better this week. Having a clear record of your training history ...


1

Taking a slightly different tact, given your lack of equipment, why not go for a mostly bodyweight workout? I trained exclusively with bodyweight for a few months when I was really concentrating on my climbing, and I was amazed at the amount of muscle I gained (and the amount of fat I lost). There are some very good resources for bodyweight workouts, some ...


3

In my opinion, this plan is not efficient and therefore you should change it. There is a couple of reasons for that: Your program should be progressive and not static. There are a few ways of making progress from one workout to another: Increase weight per set Increase reps per set (or adding sets) Reduce rest time between sets Every single ...


1

Short answer: no, not really, especially not unless you have a decent way of incrementally loading these exercises with more weight. Long answer... You wish to gain muscle, and, I assume, some strength. The two go hand in hand anyway. This requires inducing an adaptation in the body. You must produce a stress that your body is currently not equipped to ...


3

While once considered essential in bodybuilding, the importance of nutrient timing has been severely downplayed in the last few years since plenty of studies fail to show significant results and the anabolic window of increased muscle protein synthesis is quite a lot longer than used to be thought. As in, it won't matter that much whether you take your ...



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