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No, this is not ok. Let's run some numbers. As an example, lets assume you are a 6' tall, 25 year old male weighing 180 lbs. This person will have a Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) of right at 1900 calories per day. It's actually slightly higher, but 1900 is good enough. That is how many calories he would need if he simply laid around, and breathed in and out ...


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Smolov Jr. is possibly the best bench routine for pure numbers. Prilepin's Chart is also famously adapted by a number of big strength training routines (such as Westside Barbell). There is also something called the Power Matrix that a friend of mine used to get his bench to 365 lbs (@180 lbs) in under a year. If your friend progressed linearly, that ...


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If he went from 135 to 405 in five months, is doing full range (or even partial, really) and has gotten huge, there's one answer. Your friend's "secret workout" is anabolic steroids, probably injecting testosterone once a week. I should add: your friend is definitely lifting a lot as well and working out hard, but there's simply no naturally occurring ...


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For the heartbeat and fat burning the best suggestion from me is to start skipping rope. Just do the basic jump. Skipping rope detailed information On the above page under the title Health Benefits Skipping as exercise Skipping may be used for a cardiovascular workout, similar to jogging or bicycle riding. This aerobic exercise can achieve a "burn ...


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I love intervals or circuits for this. Changing up the routine helps me catch my breath, while still working my body. It also fights my biggest problem with running, jogging, biking, walking: Freaking boredom. As Dave said, though, cardio is basically doing stuff vigorously. You know what's vigorous, fun cardio? Dancing. Try to find a retro dance scene, ...


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For me its all mental, I go with full of energy and excitement to gym. Gym is a place where I have trained my mind to forget all the good/bad things and just complete my sets. I would recommend you to stick to a strict workout plan(a written) and try to finish it before leaving gym.


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I would suggest working on intervals. Dave makes a good point in his answer that progress basically requires you to work at a high intensity day after day (with rest days, of course), but it sounds like you're running yourself into the ground on these workouts. Try spacing out shorter runs with periods of walking. When you start to get tired, walk for a ...


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I used to go to the gym 2-3 years ago. But now I rarely go, because after a break I can't really do any cardio: after 7-15 minutes at a treadmill I get really tired....I've tried 5-6 times [over the course of a year], but it's always the same thing. Your problem is that you're not giving your body a chance to get better at cardio. One session where you ...


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I'm partial to Tom Kurz' Science of Sports Training. Supertraining is well spoken of. Part of the problem you'll run into is that this is an incredibly broad topic that can span multiple distinct research disciplines. Going from the high level overview down to the biochemistry will take a long time if you're just looking to put together a workout program. ...


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One book that's been helpful is Jim Stoppani's Encyclopedia of Muscle & Strength. It has information on core concepts, workout programs, and nutrition along with a handy list of exercises. It also breaks down how to organize your workout program for various possible fitness goals (losing weight, gaining muscle mass, and gaining strength).


2

A few years back, while working on writing some fitness software, I came upon a book by Jim Bennett called The Weight Training Workbook. I was so impressed by the content that I decided to package it with the software. The book opens with a foreword by Bill Pearl former Mr. America, Mr. USA, and Mr. Universe. “This no-nonsense book leaves little to the ...


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It's not that important to eat after workouts, the most important factor is your total protein intake during the day. What kind of workout do you do? If it's just weight lifting you definitely do not need carbs after workouts. An average body can store 2000 kcal of glycogen (carbs), if you are a marathon runner or professional athlete, you'll have a hard ...


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Can I just say that you should be patient. I've seen some of the younger personal trainers in my gym tell guys to do insane squats when they're starting out and the muscles just aren't developed enough. It's painful, dangerous and would scare me away from the gym. Happy training.


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15 is a very high number of reps compared to what most gym-goers do, it's also in fact, as Alex L showed, a very endurance focused rep range. There are three main factors which affect how many reps you can do: I. neurological adaptation This is your nervous systems ability to make your muscles do their work at the highest possible strength. When you work ...


3

Reps in the range of 12+ tend to be geared more towards muscle endurance than hypertrophy (more muscle mass) or strength. A vast number of training programs with a trainee's 1-rep max (1rm) in mind, this is the most that the trainee can lift one time before failure. As shown in the image, working in a lower rep range will provide your body with a ...


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Try Sense https://appsto.re/in/CF1X7.i It automatically tracks pushups, jumps, planks, squats and situps using sensors on your phone. You can share your workouts on facebook and also see workout feeds of your friends. You can even challenge your friends to workouts. It learns from your data and give you insights about how to improve your workouts.


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The question is already old, but I recently got myself faced with the same problem. Basically, the guy (Madcow) did write a few lines regarding additional exercises: For arms choose a single biceps and triceps exercise and perform them at the end once per week for 3 sets of whatever - your arms will take a beating from all the pulling and pressing ...


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Is this normal? Yes, it is normal. Should I be worried or are these common for anyone who does intense weight training? No, you do not need to worry about it. Good news is that these stretch mark will disappear after some time. Here are some article regarding the causes of stretch marks :- Mayoclinic Stretch marks sometimes occur during substantial ...


3

Yes. Generally speaking, anything that utilizes your ATP/Creatine Phosphate system will increase both size and strength. The threshold for that system begins at around 70% of your one-rep max. That said, if strength is your only goal, you would train at rep ranges that purely utilize this system, rather than ranges that also utilize the glycolytic system: ...


1

Yeah, but not much. Training for size will guarantee muscular endurance because you're working on exhausting the muscles in order to grow. This will increase your strength, but not much. For example, if you're performing 4 sets of 15 reps of bicep curls with a 30-lb dumbbell, you should be able to perform 2 sets of 5-10 reps with a 35-lb dumbbell. That's ...


3

Yes, but it depends on how advanced you are. If you've been lifting for several years, you'll generally need to focus more and more on one aspect of training in order to see results. If you're just starting out, you'll get stronger/faster/bigger/leaner doing practically any kind of weightlifting. But as those 'newbie gains' taper off, most lifters find they ...



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