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2

The cable pulldowns are a poor substitute for pullups, because while seated, and locked down (thighs under pads), there is little to no core engagement going on. There's just the activation in the upper torso. At best, they're a supplemental exercise. I would recommend doing the assisted pullup instead. Certainly, while kneeling on this plate, you're also ...


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I often consider good workouts followed by negligible sleep to be lost workouts that need to be repeated. We don't get stronger or bigger from lifting, we get stronger or bigger from lifting then eating and resting. One and a half hours sleep is extreme. I would consider your workout nearly wasted. Get back to a good sleep schedule, eat plenty, hydrate, get ...


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Short answer: Don't worry about it. This is a detail. Long answer: Restitution is very important, but as long as you don't go back to the gym and start doing another upper body workout immediately, you're still resting. You can, for instance, compensate by eating a bit more, and providing more nutrition to the muscles. So long as this is something that ...


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Answering your question is difficult and requires a guess at best. The ability to recover from an exercise session is a very individual thing. There are many factors (diet, stress, age, etc.) that need to be considered, one of which, is sleep. And, the level of intensity of your workout will also factor into your ability to recover and build mass. ...


3

You should give it a try anyway to see how close you are to being able to pull your whole body weight. Another good way to build up to pull ups is to focus on just the negative part of the rep(letting yourself down). Here you would step on something so you're at the top of the rep, and then let yourself down as slowly as you can. This will work all the ...


1

Calisthenics (body weight exercises), my friend, is one of your best options. Most calisthenic exercises do not require a lot of equipment and are very effective as they're combinations of cardio and strength training. Not only can you perform them at home, you can even perform some of them at work, right by your desk. Of course, the most famous ...


2

You could try doing some circuit training while out on your walks. Things like push ups, sit ups, box jumps(if you find a rock/bench or something to jump on), there's so many things you could add in. Could maybe also try some HIIT(bit different to jogging as it's done in short intense bursts). Also could give yoga a shot. This can be done pretty much ...


3

The reason strength training is necessary is right there in the paragraph you quote: Muscle strength is necessary for daily activities The point of muscular development is not just for bone strength, but for muscle strength. Muscles are useful in and of themselves, not just for their many benefits to other bodily functions.


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It depends on what you want to achieve. Some lifts (like cleans, and snatches) can't be done slowly. Likewise, anything that's ballistic in nature or revolves around plyometrics will be fast. On the flip side, whenever you get near your maximum weight in strength activities, it will go slow. If you can go fast, you'll be able to do more weight slowly. All ...


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The situations where keeping track is better than not include being away from a lift for a long time and forgetting how much you can do having a short memory but wanting to do more than you did last time for progressive overload, or the same routine you did last time wondering if your program is working and being able to look back to see if you've stalled ...


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It depends on your goals, but if you're shooting for: Balanced exercises that will not hurt you. The most productive use of your time. Building strength, power, and muscle size. Avoidance of over-use injuries. I would recommend following a program. Unless you were an Olympic trainer in a past life, the reality is that other people (professional trainers ...



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