Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Besides the obvious Eat, Sleep, and be healthy adviceā€¦.. Weight Training my help you grow a little with the added production of hGH but the extra height would be negligible and it would be impossible to know. Growth Hormone Treatment is the only real option to affect your height. This is a big step as a specialized doctor needs to closely monitor the ...


3

While you won't be able to do much to impact the actual height of your body through exercise, to help make use of what you do have for height you can do exercises to strengthen your back and shoulders, leading to a more upright natural position which appears taller. Deadlifts are a great exercise to accomplish this; within a few months you should notice a ...


3

Actually, height is largely genetic. However, nutrition is what impacts it from en environmental standpoint, and not exercise (it has a slight effect, assuming you are not a professional powerlifter, marathon runner or the like). So no, you cannot increase height by doing certain exercises. The notion that training basketball or volleyball makes you taller ...


3

No. Height is purely genetic. There aren't any exercises you can do that will influence your height.


2

What does your diet look like? How much are you eating? Weight loss is 90% diet, 10% exercise. You can exercise all day long but if you eat those calories back it's for naught. If you're not tracking your calories, do that. Keep track of everything you eat, everything you drink. And be careful about portion sizes. I also highly recommend weighing your food, ...


2

I'm going to start off with that there is no universally best routine. Only what is most appropriate for you given your level of training, physical development, and your goals. Advice in the world of bodybuilding (i.e. hypertrophy work), opinions are so severely divided that it's even hard to compile a list of routines. That's probably due to the fact a ...


1

The best routines for natural lifters are 5x5 routines for the most part. Stronglifts, starting strength and bill starr routines all stand out above the rest for achieving maximal results in the shortest time. If you are a natural lifter make sure to stay away from body part splits, these are useless in my opinion. As for gaining size a caloric surplus is ...


1

Bar diameter can make a significant difference in performance at pull ups, muscle ups, etc. I have a 2" bar at home and I often struggle to get a muscle up done but at my crossfit gym where the bar is 1.25" I can fly up with no problem. The argument for using a wider bar is building greater forearm strength but, at least for me, I'm extremely confident that ...


2

Low carb is indeed a very good basis to start of from. Its however not directly suitable for doing high intensity workouts. Your body is perfectly capable of producing sugar from fat and protein and will happily store that in your liver and muscles to fuel short bursts of strength. Ones your stores are exausted however, your body won't be able to produce new ...


3

+1 zero carbs kills your energy and your mental capacity/health (your brain is the largest consumer of glucose). In the short term this is OK for gains like boot camp weight loss or training for an event, but it's no way to live well. Avoid the soda and candy, but make room in your life for "good carbs" (longer chain) like almonds, sweet potatoes, kidney ...


4

My nutrition is standard low carb diet (about 40% protein / 60% fats, I eat cake/sweets max 2 times a week no more than 100g). Ding ding ding! We've found the culprit. Your body relies on carbohydrate for most of its energy. If you go low-carb, you're relying on transitioning from using carbs to ketosis, where you're using fats. Many people report ...



Top 50 recent answers are included