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9

The first thing I would do is revisit proper form for your parkour workouts. You could be overusing your grip to compensate for weakness in your back or somewhere else. As for lifting, make sure you're split is such that you only lift each muscle group once a week. Before training you should stretch your forearms. There are 4 stretches. Extend one arm ...


7

It sounds like you either injured yourself or have exposed a "weak link" in your body, meaning your wrists/forearms are not strong enough to support your movements. I would suggest going into a rehab "mode" where you focus on strengthening the injured parts of your body, approx 4-6 weeks. Note I would recommend that during this period, you avoid any ...


6

Begin by stabilizing your wrists in a neutral position with isometrics for the wrist flexors, extensors, medial and lateral deviators, pronators and supinators ( ie. resist the wrist moving 1) up, 2) down, 3) to the thumb side, 4) to the little finger side, and resist rotating the forearm by turning the palm 5) down and 6) up, without losing the neutral ...


5

Here's a great article describing your symptoms, how to test and steps to take to correct: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/drryan26.htm I think the # 1 point is (from the article) Get the right diagnosis...without that, you don't really know what it is. I would have suggested against using any kind of wrist support, since long term it's not 'fixing' the ...


5

The doctor said ... that I would recover 100% movement of the joint. In the context of your question, this provides us with little help. The fact that you will, at some point, fully recover is not to say that you are fully recovered as of this present moment. In fact, considering that your original question included the wording "my wrist still feels ...


4

The cheapest piece of exercise equipment for grip strength is one of those binder clips: They come in difference sizes, so start small and work your way up. Pinch it open between your pinky and your thumb. This tip comes from Mr. Ed Coan himself. When your grip breaks, it's always the pinky side first. If you get that side stronger the grip will be ...


4

You are wise to ask because this is an injury that you want to heal well. 3 weeks is not very long into the healing of a fracture. Most references that I looked up tell you that your therapist will direct your safe return to activity. A PT (physical therapist) or OT (occupational therapist) who specialize in hands (hand therapist) are the best ones to ...


4

Seriously, I had this issue when I used to work as a stock boy at KMart a long time ago. The doctor called it tennis elbow. This had occurred one summer when we had been receiving tons of bikes in boxes. All the boxes were the same size, shape and weight. And I picked them all up and carried them the same way from the truck to the conveyor belt going into ...


4

I think one of the most effective exercises is the wrist roller - you can make it for about $5 using a broom handle or round piece of wood, some thick string/rope and a weight plate. Here's a few items from Ross Training about making your own: http://rosstraining.com/blog/index.php?s=wrist+roller&sbutt=Go


3

Deadlifts have as one of their benefits the strengthening of your grip and wrists. It also strengthens your back, your core, and your leg muscles (quads, hams, glutes). If you don't want to do deadlifts, then you might want to look into fingertip pushups (all five fingers). Essentially, the wrist gets stronger as the muscles around it get stronger which ...


3

You could have tried different exercises to see which strained your wrist and which did not (with light weights) - it may be that pulling exercises wouldn't strain as much as pushing or vice versa. However, the right answer is to just stay off your wrist and let it recover. Losing a few weeks is really not that big a deal, and re-injuring yourself is. If ...


2

In general, when it comes to stretching, you only want to stretch warm muscles. If you attempt to stretch cold muscles they will become injured and when they repair will become smaller/tighter. In short: Stretch afterwards. The next question is how much range of motion do you need in your wrists? If your exercise has you going through the full range of ...


2

Disclaimer: when you are experiencing recurring pain that lasts for weeks during your workouts, then you should definitely consider getting a doctor or physical therapist to check it out. The rest of my answer is going to assume that you got the "all-clear" from your doctor and that this is in fact nothing more than a muscular imbalance in your wrists. To ...


2

I would suggest doing an exercise that will work your grip and another muscle group at the same time, like dead-lifts, shrugs, farmer's walk, etc. Probably the easiest of the ones mentioned would be shrugs and easy to progress since you can incrementally add weight after every week or so. I don't like using straps or gloves or anything that will ...


2

Do controlled exercises until you can get your injured wrist back to the same, or very close to, strength and range of motion of your uninjured wrist. Do light activity that gets you back into using your injured wrist - that could be as simple as playing video games or music for 10-15 minutes, cooking food, kneading bread (if you don't make your own bread, ...


1

Your biceps like to provide assistance when performing exercises for the back, however if you use a pronated grip (or overhand grip)to do your back exercises it puts the biceps in a weaker position to help out. This forces the brachioradialis muscle, to pick up the slack and aid in assisting the bigger muscle group working. The brachioradialis muscle is ...


1

What works for me is a slower and more cautious progression. Coming back from a shoulder injury, I started with three sets of five dips. I could have done many more, but I took it super slow. The next workouts looked like this: Three sets of five again Three sets of six Three sets of six Four sets of six, since I wanted more volume but felt that my form ...


1

I used to have problems with my grip half a year ago, so i started to train my forearms to increase my strength in my grip. Some excercises i added on my arm day to increase my grip strength - seated-palms-down-barbell-wrist-curl 4 sets of 25 reverse-barbell-curl 3 sets of 15 I use gloves to get a better grip so the weights don't slide off. I consider ...


1

Your workout frequency suggests overtraining. Particularly since you'll be gripping weights for almost any kind of exercise, your forearms really aren't getting a break. If you're doing wrist curls, it'll exacerbate it that much more. Having at minimum one rest day between workouts is pretty essential, regardless of what you're doing . Unless you're using ...


1

You don't state what activity you do as a primary one. That will have a bearing on what you can/should be doing with the wrist. Every sport is going to have it's risks while still healing. For instance, running you could fall, swimming is obviously out, same with cycling unless you're in aero bars on a TT bike. There's nothing to say that you can't get ...



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