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visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Jul 4 '12 at 13:49

Jun
14
comment Does eating late at night cause weight gain?
That's my point, write it like that, not with "high sugar/low sugar", which is misleading.
Jun
13
comment Does eating late at night cause weight gain?
Shouldn't "minimum blood sugar" be worse for the fat-burning since it's more economic? (ie, the body is adjusting to function on less energy than usual.) Also, seems like minimum/maximum level seems here to be a byproduct of other factors, not a deciding factor in itself.
May
8
comment Is coffee good or bad for your health?
Seriously, how is consuming of coffee not a topic for "Fitness and NUTRITION"?
May
8
comment Does lactose inhibit fat loss?
First you write that "Dairy Products will help you lose weight due to their high calcium concentration", and then you write "In summary, "Milk" and "Dairy Products" in moderation aren't going to have a major effect on your fat loss". Which one is it?
Mar
29
comment Does the amount of breathing (holding breath/breathing fast) affect the calories burned during a workout (not heavylifting)?
Alright, that last one nailed it :)
Mar
28
comment Does the amount of breathing (holding breath/breathing fast) affect the calories burned during a workout (not heavylifting)?
Ivo, could you explain more the "However, this is only required for athletes who have to perform in energy deprived situations and want to push the limit." part? Does it burn more "fuel" per J of energy produced or not?
Mar
28
comment Does the amount of breathing (holding breath/breathing fast) affect the calories burned during a workout (not heavylifting)?
I see, well I guess you could say that the assumption was that since there are several ways to breath, presumably letting in more/less air into the system during the exercise, the body must have some ways of variating the burning processes, and that those variations could affect the efficiency of the process also in terms of consumed fuel.
Mar
28
comment Does the amount of breathing (holding breath/breathing fast) affect the calories burned during a workout (not heavylifting)?
Well I simply meant that I couldn't answer your question because it is the same question that I have asked, so I don't know the answer.
Mar
27
comment Does the amount of breathing (holding breath/breathing fast) affect the calories burned during a workout (not heavylifting)?
Wouldn't this mean that taking in less air during an exercise does indeed burn more calories because the body is forced to use the 2 latter ways, and as you wrote, they require more calories? (because the energy depleted during that has to be replenished from burning fat (i.e. calories?)) (Or do you mean that this whole "use stored energy/then replenish by breaking fats later" breaks even to almost exactly the same amount of fats burned as the oxidative pathway does, when it is using the energy from burning directly? (hope that makes sense)
Mar
27
comment Does the amount of breathing (holding breath/breathing fast) affect the calories burned during a workout (not heavylifting)?
Well I am not expecting anything, I am asking how it is.
May
17
comment How does our body dispose of excess calories (physiologically speaking)?
Thank you Berin for a big answer, however, I feel that you are a little off-topic. I am not trying to find out general facts about the digestion system, I am trying to answer the specific question. (And while other information may be required to learn before I can understand the answer, I don't see how this is the case here.) Please read the update in my question. Thanks for your response anyway. (Also, by my definition, B only stands for the energy (calories) - not vitamins, minerals, proteins or other things used up by any non-energetical mechanisms or cell construction.)
May
16
comment How does our body dispose of excess calories (physiologically speaking)?
I dont understand, does your comment about the kidneys and colon suggest that the body can in fact only digest a part of nutrients and dispose of the rest in form of unprocessed carbs/fats/whatnot? What does this depend on? How does it decide how much to digest and how much to leave? I know about the insulin and sugar, but what controls the initial sugar level? It can't be ONLY the diet, that's what I don't get.