4,266 reputation
1222
bio website yogatwists.barbiehebron.com
location San Francisco, CA
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Oct 16 '11 at 19:04

Passionate about anything to do with the mind and body: B.Sc. Kinesiology, B.A. Cogntive Science, Registered Yoga Teacher, Fitness Instructor, and Writer.


Apr
3
comment When will muscle be cannibalized?
Your questions are so great, JoJo. I don't have time to answer this one now, but if no one else answers it in the next day or so, I can shed some light on this topic for you :) p.s. Is your avatar a photo of you? Do you compete?
Apr
2
comment What are the nutritional benefits of saturated fats?
@J. Winchester, That's interesting, I didn't know that there was any question about high LDL being a risk factor for CVD; I wont make that assumption in the future. My intent with those studies was more to show the importance of PUFA's than to attack SFA's. You're right, recent research suggests that saturated fat may not be associated with increased risk of CVD (aside: this doesn't mean their -beneficial-, per se)--but the prevailing way to explain away previous research that SFA's were bad is to say PUFA's are good. This last statement in this answer directly contradicts this.
Apr
2
comment Does the existence of trans fat invalidate years of research on saturated fats?
You're right, my last paragraph was a little vague. I've edited it to better reflect the nature of the findings.
Apr
2
revised Does the existence of trans fat invalidate years of research on saturated fats?
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Apr
1
revised What are the nutritional benefits of saturated fats?
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Apr
1
comment What are the nutritional benefits of saturated fats?
@Allen Here are three academic studies that contradict your conclusion about polyunsaturated fat being more dangerous that saturated fat. PubMed1, PubMed2, The American Journal of Clinical Nurtition. Considering CVD is the number one killer in the world (Wikipedia), I wouldn't advise people to cut out polyunsaturates.
Apr
1
comment Is it true that thinking uses a lot of calories?
I've modified the answer to reflect the nature of that pubmed citation better. For me the SciAm article isn't evidence against the quote from Livestrong because it takes firing neurons to operate body processes as well as thought. The article doesn't distinguish between neurons dedicated to different tasks. The last paragraph does indicate that visual stimulation may increase energy expenditure, but is it by enough to be considered "a lot"? And is visual perception really considered "thinking"?
Apr
1
revised Is it true that thinking uses a lot of calories?
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Apr
1
comment Is it true that thinking uses a lot of calories?
Thanks for the source, Matt! I've added it to my answer.
Apr
1
revised Is it true that thinking uses a lot of calories?
Added another source.
Mar
31
comment Is it true that thinking uses a lot of calories?
The brain probably consumes some of that extra energy some of that extra energy (I really don't know for sure). But a stress response is systemic, causing stuff like increased heart rate and breathing rate, which consume quite a bit of extra energy. You're right though, there are boundary issues; even if the brain doesn't burn much extra energy itself, it triggers the stress response, so you could say it's responsible for burning those calories.
Mar
31
comment Is it true that thinking uses a lot of calories?
It sounds like this is due to emotional stress rather than thought (Google Book)
Mar
31
answered Is it true that thinking uses a lot of calories?
Mar
31
answered Probiotics: differences between bacterial strains
Mar
30
awarded  Mortarboard
Mar
30
answered Following the Glycemic Indexes theory?
Mar
30
revised What is a good way to estimate percentage of body fat?
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Mar
30
answered What is a good way to estimate percentage of body fat?
Mar
30
revised What's the difference between calories and kcal
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Mar
30
comment Should I eat more calories when working out even though I'm trying to lose weight?
Very detailed answer. The definition of BMR is off though. I think for the most part you just mean energy expenditure, which is the sum of BMR, thermic effect of food, and physical activity level (PAL). BMR only refers to the very base level of energy expended at rest. Aerobic exercise does cause a short-term increase in BMR and, as you mentioned, strength training causes a long-term increase in BMR, but when you're talking about burning calories during exercise, you're usually talking about PAL, not BMR.