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bio website ferrousmaverick.blogspot.com
location Washington, DC
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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
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I'm a regular over at http://ironstrong.org, started lifting weights regularly in April 2011 after I lost 85lbs of weight. I started modestly, with just the bar on most exercises, and as of April 2014, I'm able to lift:

  • Squat: 455lb
  • Bench: 290lb
  • Overhead press: 170lb
  • Deadlift: 520lb

I'm still improving, both in the amount I can lift, and removing the amount of fat I'm carrying around.


Feb
15
answered Fine tuning meal and exercise plan to improve muscle growth and fat loss
Feb
15
comment Is eating rice everyday healthy?
Rice doesn't have a lot of nutritional value, but as a grain white rice is least damaging to your body. It's macronutrient makeup is primarily carbohydrates. nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5712/2
Feb
15
answered Training the legs and Muscle growth
Feb
15
comment What weight dumbbells should I buy?
Light is whatever is easy for you. If you can lift 10kg without problem for all your exercises go for it. I've seen some kids try and use 3.5kg and it was too much for them--at least for the exercise they were trying. You'll have to try it out before you buy.
Feb
14
answered How can you tell that you are eating enough to build your muscles?
Feb
14
answered Are dumbbells alone enough to build strength?
Feb
14
answered What weight dumbbells should I buy?
Feb
13
answered Worthwhile to cross-train while preparing for half-marathon
Feb
13
comment If I build up my muscles and then don't use them for a while, then will the “build-up” regress after a while?
Also important to note is the effect of "muscle memory". When you start training again, your body will regain its old strength faster the second time than it took the first time.
Feb
13
answered What is the cheapest, quickest way to gain some basic muscle?
Feb
10
answered Is the Pendlay row the same as a bent-over barbell row?
Feb
9
comment weight/bodyweight training and some of its “negative” side effects
Look into LeanGains or something similar. You don't have to do the intermittent fasting part, although that does accelerate things a bit. However, carb and calorie cycling (both parts of the protocol) are proven workers. If you are within 15% body fat (flat stomach, no definition), then you can use the "Recomp" protocol. +20% on training days, -20% on rest days--training 3 days a week.
Feb
9
answered weight/bodyweight training and some of its “negative” side effects
Feb
7
answered Guidelines for taking useful progress pictures
Feb
7
comment How to keep fit while travelling long-term?
Describe what travelling long term means. There's only so much you can do while on a bus, but when you are not sitting there are some things you can do. It just helps to understand what the days look like.
Feb
6
answered Do carbs make people sleepy?
Feb
6
comment Any authoritative references for strength training nutrition requirements?
It's the proportions that are off. Fats are an important part of dietary requirements--not to mention the number of fat born vitamins that are quite necessary to weightlifting like Vitamin D, and the Omega-3 balance needed as well.
Feb
4
comment Any authoritative references for strength training nutrition requirements?
That is contrary to most weightlifting dietary guidelines I've found. The insulin spike needed from carb intake post workout is well documented, and restores the glycogen you just depleted. However, keeping the insulin spiked too much for too long leads to inducing a cortisol response as well as putting someone in an insulin resistant state. Very not good.
Feb
3
comment Working out - do taller people have it harder?
@Ivo Flipse: I believe you provided the definition of power. Power is even more telling when you are comparing Olympic lifts to the slower "power lifts". Moving a barbell the same distance, but at a faster rate of speed requires more power.
Feb
3
answered Any authoritative references for strength training nutrition requirements?