2,862 reputation
716
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location United States
age 37
visits member for 3 years, 6 months
seen Dec 13 '12 at 17:23

Food and fitness enthusiast


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Aug
9
awarded  Enlightened
Aug
9
awarded  Nice Answer
May
6
awarded  Yearling
Aug
23
awarded  Good Answer
May
6
awarded  Yearling
Oct
2
comment How can runners carry water?
I've seen people with these on their hip: roadrunnersports.com/rrs/products/RRU1145
Sep
29
answered I run 7 miles in an hour, how can i make it 10 miles in an hour?
Sep
29
comment What are the trade-offs of weight versus repetition?
+1 Please add a citation for the first chart.
Sep
27
awarded  Talkative
Sep
24
comment Are multiple sets with decreasing weight and no rest between them a good idea?
The problem here is your comparison of this method to walking (and earlier to an 8 lbs kettlebell). It's hyperbolic, and it makes it hard to pay attention to your more valid criticism.
Sep
24
comment Are multiple sets with decreasing weight and no rest between them a good idea?
@DaveLiepmann Actually, the OP asks, "Is this effective" and the answer is yes, many people use a similar method effectively. You said "Increased Strength, not really", which I think is completely wrong. So you think you disagree with Wendler, but your criticism suggests that you don't really know the details. But that's OK, spout on.
Sep
24
comment Are multiple sets with decreasing weight and no rest between them a good idea?
@DaveLiepmann This also sounds like a variation of Wendler's assistance work where you do 50 reps at 50% of your max after completing your worksets. It may or may not be the optimal program for everyone, but it's hard to doubt its effectiveness.
Sep
24
comment Are multiple sets with decreasing weight and no rest between them a good idea?
@FrankH This negative rep scheme works your muscles to exhaustion, which is extremely effective if you get enough rest afterwards. I used this method in high school (when I needed less rest) with great success. I'm not sure why Dave thinks this wouldn't be effective. It is the cornerstone of classic strength routines.
Sep
23
comment grams of protein vs calorie intake
@Informaficker That paper says "protein intakes in the range of 1.3–1.8 g/kg consumed as 3–4 isonitrogenous meals will maximize muscle protein synthesis". Sounds pretty close to 2g/kg to me. It also says "experienced athletes would require less", which is the opposite of what you stated. The information from your physician may be anecdotal, but most importantly, it is second hand and unverifiable.
Sep
23
comment grams of protein vs calorie intake
A lot of strength gains are neurological, where your muscle fibers learn to work better. I have added over 100lbs to most of my lifts over 3 years without any weight gain at all and some small body composition improvements.
Sep
23
comment grams of protein vs calorie intake
The paper suggests 1.5-2g/kg. The OP is targeting 2g/kg. Your suggestion that because he is not a professional athlete, he needs well below 2g/kg is speculation that is not supported by your citation.
Sep
21
awarded  Custodian
Sep
18
comment Are you losing fat or fluids if you diet and drink alot?
@JohnP A timely article published yesterday: nytimes.com/2012/09/18/health/research/…
Sep
18
comment Are you losing fat or fluids if you diet and drink alot?
@JohnP Obesity may predict a shorter life expectancy, but it's a jump to say that reducing obesity would lengthen it. Science is littered with the corpses of that type of assumption. And, of course, there are no diets that have been proven to cause long term sustainable weight-loss, so it's a moot point.