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Jul
24
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
@JohnP Bonking isn't exactly a technical term; I'm using it to describe a very clear and unexpected drop-off in performance. Try not eating any non green vegetable carbohydrates for a week. You will feel completely fine, you will be able to run distances. Everything will be great. Then try a 5-10 minute crossfit workout; it won't go well. There is nothing dangerous about that state, you just run out of energy for that type of activity. I can't speak to the very specific amounts of glycogen you are listing, but I can speak to the result.
Jul
24
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
@siouxfan45 Changing energy sources from carbs to fat, or fat to carb, can be difficult for the the body (it is sometimes referred to as Atkins Flu). Although it only lasts for about 10 days for most people, it can be ameliorated by keeping your salt and fat intake up. After the body has adjusted, it can run on fat better than it does on carbs. I think your claims regarding kidneys are unsubstantiated for people without renal disease, but the diet is referred to as LCHF (low carb- high fat), not LCHP (high protein).
Jul
24
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
@siouxfan45 Please skip the unsubstantiated and inflammatory claims. You aren't adding to the discussion.
Jul
24
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
@RobinAshe The "Low" carb % in the study is 40%. It's also an epidemiological study based on food journals, which is useful, but not really proof of anything.
Jul
24
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
Very high metabolic exercise uses glycogen very quickly. (For example, Fran in crossfit.) If that exercise is extended for several minutes, glycogen will be used faster than it can be replenished, and an individual eating very low carbohydrate might run out, and "bonk". (This has happened to me.) But this type of exercise is not required for anyone, and most people don't do it.
Jul
24
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
@RobinAshe What is essential in carbohydrate? How do you know no one has ever gotten sick from 1:1:1?
Jul
24
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
@RobinAshe Proven by whom? Please give a source.
Jul
23
comment Why doesn't my stamina seem to improve?
@hrishikeshp19 If you aren't drinking water for the entirety of your workout, dehydration could also be the entire explanation for any problems you are having.
Jul
23
comment Why doesn't my stamina seem to improve?
@RyanMiller I don't see that this conversation in any way helps the OP, so I'm not going to continue it.
Jul
23
comment Why doesn't my stamina seem to improve?
@RyanMiller BMI of 29: whatsurfrantime.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/rf.jpg?w=529 BMI is useless, especially for athletes.
Jul
23
comment Suggested Protein/Fat/Carb Ratio?
@siouxfan Weight loss questions unrelated to sport and fitness are off-topic.
Jul
23
comment Why doesn't my stamina seem to improve?
@RyanMiller What is the point of this comment? 6' 170# definitely sounds slim, but the diet changes are for performance improvements, not weight change.
Jul
21
answered Why doesn't my stamina seem to improve?
Jul
21
comment Why doesn't my stamina seem to improve?
@hrishikeshp19 Try to give people more than 15 minutes before you accept an answer.
Jul
19
comment Calorie calculations for weight reduction
Fair enough, the tables show approximately 450kcal deficit rather than 750kcal target. 450*6months/13 lbs = 6500kcal/lbs. That's closer, but still off by almost a factor of 2. And that's one study, looking at the magical 6 month honeymoon period.
Jul
19
comment Calorie calculations for weight reduction
But that is a circular argument. They are saying, the client was supposed to have a 750kcal deficit, but since they didn't lose the weight, we calculated that the real deficit was 225. That is what every study blames the result on, but feeding restricted in clinical settings gets the same result.
Jul
19
comment Calorie calculations for weight reduction
The final study works backwards with the assumption that 3500kcal=1lbs. In the study though, diets were estimated to be 1447kcal/day compared to energy expenditure of 2775/day for a weight loss of 19.8lbs over 24 weeks. That is 11,700kcal/lbs.
Jul
19
comment Calorie calculations for weight reduction
The second study had closer to 17lbs over 6 months with a similar caloric restriction: 8000kcal/lbs. They stopped at 6 months, which is important, because that is when weight loss usually stalls and reverses in studies.
Jul
19
comment Calorie calculations for weight reduction
In your first study, a 750kCal/day deficit resulted in an average of 13lbs over 6 months. That's 10,000kcal/lbs. After 6 months, weight loss stopped despite continued caloric restriction. After 12 months, weight started to come back, despite continued caloric restriction.
Jul
19
comment Calorie calculations for weight reduction
-1 Please stop repeating the 3500kcal deficit = 1bs weight loss fallacy. It is not supported by ANY clinical trial EVER. Not even close.