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I'm a big Rippetoe fan and his use of the standing overhead barbell press. It's my go-to upper body pushing lift, I try to do it 2x as much as I bench. Being able to press your own bodyweight is a real strength achievement in its own right, and steady pressing has had my own shoulders in good shape.

There's a good answer with discussion over hereThere's a good answer with discussion over here.

I don't have any hard data on it, but I've been doing gymnastics for a while on rings, and the stabilization required for that is tremendous. If you have a set of rings laying around consider trying to maintain the support position for a while, and maybe move into ring dips (if you aren't there already). Off topic, but another great thing about rings is that you can do a ton of really tough exercises with them and they travel well.

Looking around a gym it's pretty easy to see where a lot of the shoulder injuries come from: non-stop bench pressing with little back (or rear deltoid) development, isolation work (again, almost always neglecting the back), and impingement inducing zany exercises.

I'm a big Rippetoe fan and his use of the standing overhead barbell press. It's my go-to upper body pushing lift, I try to do it 2x as much as I bench. Being able to press your own bodyweight is a real strength achievement in its own right, and steady pressing has had my own shoulders in good shape.

There's a good answer with discussion over here.

I don't have any hard data on it, but I've been doing gymnastics for a while on rings, and the stabilization required for that is tremendous. If you have a set of rings laying around consider trying to maintain the support position for a while, and maybe move into ring dips (if you aren't there already). Off topic, but another great thing about rings is that you can do a ton of really tough exercises with them and they travel well.

Looking around a gym it's pretty easy to see where a lot of the shoulder injuries come from: non-stop bench pressing with little back (or rear deltoid) development, isolation work (again, almost always neglecting the back), and impingement inducing zany exercises.

I'm a big Rippetoe fan and his use of the standing overhead barbell press. It's my go-to upper body pushing lift, I try to do it 2x as much as I bench. Being able to press your own bodyweight is a real strength achievement in its own right, and steady pressing has had my own shoulders in good shape.

There's a good answer with discussion over here.

I don't have any hard data on it, but I've been doing gymnastics for a while on rings, and the stabilization required for that is tremendous. If you have a set of rings laying around consider trying to maintain the support position for a while, and maybe move into ring dips (if you aren't there already). Off topic, but another great thing about rings is that you can do a ton of really tough exercises with them and they travel well.

Looking around a gym it's pretty easy to see where a lot of the shoulder injuries come from: non-stop bench pressing with little back (or rear deltoid) development, isolation work (again, almost always neglecting the back), and impingement inducing zany exercises.

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I'm a big Rippetoe fan and his use of the standing overhead barbell press. It's my go-to upper body pushing lift, I try to do it 2x as much as I bench. Being able to press your own bodyweight is a real strength achievement in its own right, and steady pressing has had my own shoulders in good shape.

There's a good answer with discussion over here.

I don't have any hard data on it, but I've been doing gymnastics for a while on rings, and the stabilization required for that is tremendous. If you have a set of rings laying around consider trying to maintain the support position for a while, and maybe move into ring dips (if you aren't there already). Off topic, but another great thing about rings is that you can do a ton of really tough exercises with them and they travel well.

Looking around a gym it's pretty easy to see where a lot of the shoulder injuries come from: non-stop bench pressing with little back (or rear deltoid) development, isolation work (again, almost always neglecting the back), and impingement inducing zany exercises.