4

They say there are more than one types of step. Is there any exam that can help me know my foot angle/type/format/etc, so i can buy running shoes that are good for my feet?

  • 3
    Any decent running store should be able to perform a gait analysis. – JohnP Mar 6 '13 at 18:27
  • Oh, i didn't know it was called gait analysis. Thx for the info. – MurifoX Mar 6 '13 at 18:41
  • I don't really get the question here. It might be useful, but in its current form I don't really get it. – Baarn Mar 6 '13 at 20:53
  • Instead of closing the question, can we change the title? I think its a general question about pronation, and about identifying potential orthopedic issues that could affect a running shoe decision. – DavidR Mar 6 '13 at 21:45
2

You are trying to determine if you are an over or under pronator (or a neutral runner).

Pronating is the movement your foot makes as it strikes the ground. Over pronation is when the foot rolls in at more than 15% causing the big toe to do most of the push off. Under pronating or supination is when the foot rolls in at less than 15% leaving most of the stress on the outside of the foot.

One way to determine this is by examining an old pair of running shoes and looking at the wear pattern. If the majority of wear is on the inside of the shoe you're likely an over pronator. If it's on the outside, under pronator.

Any of your local running specialty stores should be able to provide you with a proper gait analysis and help you get in the correct pair of shoes.

| improve this answer | |
  • That's good to know. I have bought a new pair of running shoes and i didn't know if it will be the right one for me. – MurifoX Mar 6 '13 at 19:09
  • 1
    There are also the people that strike with their heel/fore/mid foot first... – BryceH Mar 6 '13 at 19:43
1

I don't remember the name of the place around where I live but there are places that will record you running and have it analyzed and tell you what type of runner you are and also the best type of shoe for you (which they obviously carry but you don't have to buy). Sorry I can't find the website but here's one I came across that may help.

Learn Your Foot Type

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.