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I'm trying to get back into doing longer runs, having done up to marathon distances in the past. One thing I used to do was wrap a fabric plaster around the smallest toe on each foot, as after a while I would feel the shoes rubbing.

The same is happening now with some new shoes, so I'm putting the plasters back on but I am having the same problems I used to of the plasters coming away with sweat or general movement. I used to use fabric plasters, cutting strips off and applying a couple with cotton wool on the toe to help pad it more.

I was wondering if there is a better way of preventing the rubbing?

EDIT: Yes I am wearing socks. Usually just thick(ish) white ones, but recently using ones for running with padding in the heel and prevent blisters.

  • Are you wearing socks? – meanderingmoose Jul 25 '14 at 16:16
  • Thanks for the answers guys, I'll try them all out and pick the best. – VictorySaber Jul 29 '14 at 7:17
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Rubbing is generally only a concern when chaffing occurs, so unless you are finding your toes red and sore after a run I wouldn't be too concerned yet.

However, if you have noticed chaffing is a problem, rather than a barrier solution like plasters which can move and possibly increasing chaffing, why not aim for a lubrication solution instead.

Chaffing occurs when skin rubs continuously against each other. Plasters minimise this by putting a barrier in place, so the plaster rubs together, rather than the skin. However, this make just move the points of friction to the edges of the plaster, or if the plasters aren't adhesive enough they may move and bunch up causing increased pressure in areas between toes, potentially increasing friction and chaffing.

A better alternative is to apply a lubricant to the toes where rubbing occurs to reduce friction when the toes rub against each other. Investing in a good quality runners lubricant is well worth it as it can be used to prevent all of the common chaffing problems in runners.

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Baby powder. Blow it in your socks, blow it on your toes, and you will be good for at least a few hours.

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  • Ah, in the UK we call it talcum powder. – VictorySaber Jul 27 '14 at 20:15

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