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When I train fingers, I tend to do low rep and too high weights -- this is probably the wrong way to do it! Then next day I can feel some little pain or easily get blisters when skin so sore. I have a lot of climbing buddies whose fingers are like steel (not soft). How to get that kind of fingers? What is the number of reps and the weights and duration of exercises meant to increase the muscles of fingers?

My background

  1. Fingers for intensive sports requiring hands a lot? Recoving from ulnar claw?

  2. Warmups and trainings for Shoulder cuff?

  3. Recovering from scar tissues due to blisters in hands?

  • Are you asking how to train for grip-strength? Or how to grow clauses? (FYI: There's very little actual muscle in the hands - your fingers are moved via forearm muscles.) – john3103 Oct 13 '14 at 16:20
  • @john3103 I don't know, I know very little about muscles in hands -- I have studied the anatomy but my physiological/fitness understanding is weak but wanting to improve! I feel I should train for variety: grip, technique and so on. Perhaps you know better what I should train? – hhh Oct 14 '14 at 1:42
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you can train muscles of finger by these five tips 1) Bouldering 2) Fingerboard Repeaters 3) Hypergravity Bouldering 4) Feet-on Lunging Exercises 5) Campus Training

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    For future answers, maybe consider expanding a bit. Here's a good reference for writing quality answers: fitness.stackexchange.com/help/how-to-answer – Eric Oct 13 '14 at 16:49
  • Should I use external weights with fingerboard repeaters (I love them!)? I need to break homeostatis: I have done all of this but I find not improving -- training small muscles is so different to larger muscles (I know there is a lot of technique/flexibility involved so taking perhaps just time?). I feel that I need to train either with very very small weights (many many reps) or very large weighs (very little reps). There must be some training plans available. – hhh Oct 14 '14 at 1:46
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Anything grip related pretty much. Most of that comes from your forearm. Since my background is powerlifting I find any barbell or dumbbell work tends to improve it. Chinups and variations of that will help a lot, and help with climbing in general I'd imagine.

Again this isn't as applicable to climbing directly as general grip strength.

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I have such specific hobbies that I list here tailored training for each muscle group, many of them are hardly known within practioners. I am working on this and trying to find proper anatomic names to each muscle(s).

Also I use wrist supports (you can find in MMA shops) when my wrist may get irritated, this has helped me to train my arms and fingers and not injuring wrists!

Sports

Golf

Back-swing muscle training

  1. behind-back traditional-tricep-training bar-over-head with inverse grip: does not train tricep but the small twisting muscle (use very small weights!)

....... I fixed a backhand pain with this exercise.

....... TRAINS: grip, little muscle used in backswing/forearm.

Tennis

Forearm strengthening for forehand: barber curl (thumbs up/down) and general forearm training.

........ I alleviated my Ulnar Nerve by this.

Fencing, Hockey, Boxing -- sports where pain easily in the top of the hand

  1. String tensions for hands

  2. String tensions for fingers.

........ before starting training, they remove pain by increasing the blood flow and make sure you are not injured. There are very very small string tensions for fingers that I like a lot!

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