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I love beer but I want to get muscles too.

Is it ok if I drink 2 x 0.33 L cans per day? Beer has 5% alc.

closed as off-topic by JohnP, Dave Liepmann, user2861, FredrikD, rrirower Dec 11 '14 at 13:39

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But I just have two glasses per day, that's healthy, right?

For all these conditions [colorectum, liver and breast cancers, essential hypertension and chronic pancreatitis], low intakes, corresponding to daily consumption of two drinks or two glasses of wine (25 g/day), have shown significant risks. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10790907

The "two-per-day is fine" notion that has somehow proliferated through society is a fallacy. (Not to be cynical, but the notion is probably perpetuated by the alcohol industry. If anyone can find the study that suggests two drinks per day isn't harmful, I'm interested in seeing it -- but see "Positive Effects of Alcohol Consumption" section here first.)

Look at these reports from the CDC. They're terrible. Every one of those deaths is undoubtedly a sob story. In 2001, the CDC estimated 2.3 million years of potential life were lost due to adverse health consequences from alcohol (source).

But it helps me fall asleep:

In low to moderate doses, alcohol initially promotes sleep. However, scientific consensus maintains that chronic use ultimately disrupts sleep-related physiology–even among those who do not meet diagnostic criteria for alcohol dependence. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2775419/

and

Low doses of alcohol may partially improve sleep, but there are reductions in slow wave activity, and disturbances in REM sleep are likely above 0.32 g/kg. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/6155259

and

Alcohol increased the duration and frequency of the occlusive episodes in five patients with obstructive sleep apnoea, and resulted in a marked increase in the degree of hypoxaemia in the first hour of sleep. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7077345

Decreased pancreas function means an impact on insulin, which means an impact on muscle growth. Decreased sleep means an impact on cortisol, insulin, and growth hormone, which means an impact on muscle growth (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC297368/).

These are just a couple of examples of physiological effects. There is a font of information out there proving alcohol does the body or the mind absolutely no good.


Speaking anecdotally, I know that nothing tastes better after a tough workout than an ice cold beer. I've been there. Two or three beers every night after a workout -- and I worked out every day. Nobody needs convincing that it's bad. You can feel the negative effects after the buzz wears off. Personally I feel the negative effects for a few days after drinking. It really screws with the hormones. I wasn't able to make serious progress with my training until I gave it up, and I imagine it's the same for most people. You won't find any olympians who drink regularly.

  • Without participating in the "to drink or not to drink" debate, I must say I find your claim that You won't find any olympians who drink regularly quite questionable. Usain Bolt seems to be one counterexample, complex.com/sports/2015/05/… . We also have this paper athletestore.co.uk/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/… according to which (continued) – gaazkam Mar 7 '16 at 17:09
  • …according to which In spite of the potential for negative effects on performance and health, there is ample evidence that alcohol features prominently in the lifestyles of many athletes at all levels of competition. While it might not be strictly about Olympics, it might be also worthy to review this list: complex.com/sports/2012/10/… . And António Pinto the marathon victor claimed to had been drinking wine on nights before races run247.com/articles/… – gaazkam Mar 7 '16 at 17:16
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It's OK, but certainly not good for you

Since you're not getting plastered-drunk on two cans of beer, you're not impeding muscle-growth much. Beer does have plenty of calories, and they are liquid calories, so your hunger-levels don't notice them as much.

I would recommend keeping the beer-drinking to weekends - an everyday habit can add-up in calories.

Here's a detailed guide from Testosterone Nation:

http://www.t-nation.com/diet-fat-loss/lifters-guide-to-alcohol

  • Link only answers are frowned upon. – JohnP Oct 28 '14 at 21:42
  • Good point. Allow me to add some better content. – john3103 Oct 28 '14 at 21:45

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