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I've been having a hard time increasing my protein intake. I live in a university dormitory where we are not allowed to cook. Cafeterias don't offer a lot of healthy options either (I'm from the Philippines, by the way, and Filipino food is usually loaded with grease). On the other hand, I am also lactose intolerant, has GERD and possibly IBS. I have tried various brands of whey protein before, including those with whey protein isolate as main ingredient but I tend to become bloated after taking them. One thing that doesn't upset my stomach are eggs. Then I learned that there is such a thing as egg white powder (the kind used in baking) and it's pretty cheap. A kilo (~2.2lbs) costs only PhP1000 (~US$22), more than half the price of most whey protein sold here.

My questions are as follows:

  1. Is it a good idea to make shakes using egg white powder? I can imagine that adding water will reconstitute it into its original, slimy form. Will it cause stomach troubles? I've never tried raw eggs before.
  2. What is the difference between the egg white powder used in baking and egg protein powder?
  3. Is it safe to store egg white powder without refrigeration?
  • Have you also considered other protein sources? Lactose intolerant people are usually able to consume yogurt and cheese. Might the dorm allow a small personal refrigerator? (it should run you about USD 75-100, see if you can get roommates to chip in; everyone likes cold drinks easily available). You can store yogurt, cheese and sliced meats in it, or even boiled eggs (in-the-shell they keep for a week or two; you'd have to buy them boiled). You could also try bean sprouts, soybeans and peanut butter. – Jay Oct 30 '14 at 18:27
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Is it a good idea to make shakes using egg white powder? I can imagine that adding water will reconstitute it into its original, slimy form. Will it cause stomach troubles? I've never tried raw eggs before.

Egg whites also go by the name albumen, by which the fatty yolks have been filtered away. Most people who use egg protein powder are like you: they want a quick protein source but can't handle whey. Egg protein really has a quite decent nutritional profile and contains a lot of leucine, but whey has more. Whether it's enough to make a difference is up for debate but for those who can handle whey, they go with it because it's "better" and there are a lot more flavor options.

What is the difference between the egg white powder used in baking and egg protein powder?

The kind designed for baking may have additional gelling agents, might not be as refined, and probably won't mix as well. One is designed to be baked into other food, the other for direct mixing with water and consumption.

Is it safe to store egg white powder without refrigeration?

Yes. It has an expiration date like everything else. Egg protein is filtered, sterilized, and dried. It will "go bad" like any other food product, starting with a degradation in taste and mixing ability.

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Eggs - both whites and whole eggs - have a long and storied role in the muscle building history.

  1. Google egg white powder and you can see it sold as a supplement.
  2. This will probably be product specific.
  3. The product itself will probably have storage instructions.

Since your question is largely about personal digestion issues, it seems you will need to try it yourself to see how your body responds.

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    This is more commentary than an actual answer. – rrirower Oct 30 '14 at 15:24
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Yes definitely it's a better alternative. I myself was talking egg white but there is a major problem associated which is hair loss as far as my research the eh white contains a component which binds biotin exclusively and after long time there can be deficiency of biotin in the body which create problem

Really egg white is good alternative and the results are also good. I personally have experienced.

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