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I have been doing finger push-ups with standing slant against the wall for 2-3 weeks with 3 sets of 20 for the biceps.Now i want to improve and be able to lift weights.After going through this post which variation of push ups is best suggested for the arms(if am not wrong the extensors,flexors/fore arms if possible triceps).

Also please suggest the correct pattern of increasing the count(i.e. for ex if i keep doing 3 sets of 20 push ups for 3 weeks thrice a week then after which week or certain time i should increase the count to say 30 or 25).

Note:-Due to lack of space and time i choose push ups as it does not require any thing special (equipment/space). If anything else is available then i am open to modifications

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    If you are specifically concerned with for arms you may wanna try a rice bucket... Its cheap, easy, and great for forearms – ford prefect Nov 13 '14 at 18:50
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    @inquisitiveIdiot what exactly is the rice bucket.Would be helpful with proper explanation – user285oo6 Nov 14 '14 at 4:50
  • Fill a 5 gallon bucket half full with rice and knead it with your hands – ford prefect Nov 15 '14 at 21:11
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You can do

  • Fingertip push-ups as stated in an answer before,
  • Broom stick push-ups or peaces of wood (approx 20 cm in length) (you have to hold the sticks in your hand with the thumbs pointing up, and
    the broom-stick or wood is touching the ground) so only your feet and the two peaces of wood are touching the ground. Tremendous forearm builder!

Here is a picture from the book Bodyweight Exercises for Extraordinary Strength: enter image description here

But what I agree on the other answers that the push-up is not the best tool for forearm development, you should include pull-/chin-ups with a lot of variations in your program.

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A number of things jump out here.

  1. Pushups aren't known for being a great forearm developer. Look into pull-ups, or dumbbell farmer's walks, or deadlifts.
  2. Why wall push-ups? If you can do floor push-ups you should do those.
  3. You should be increasing the reps you can do as much as you can. Keep a few "in the tank"—don't go to absolute failure in every set–but you should be increasing the number of reps per set steadily over time. If you can't yet do floor push-ups then that should be your goal.
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  • Why should he not train to absolute failure in every set? – Badr Fennane Feb 23 '16 at 11:00
  • @BadrFennane The benefits of training to actual muscle failure in a given set do not always outweigh the costs, such as injury risk, acceptance and normalization of bad form, and metabolic stress. – Dave Liepmann Feb 23 '16 at 11:45
  • @mitro If the question is "what kind of pushups for forearms" then point 1 answers it fully: "none; do these other exercises instead". The question contains a sub-question about how to increase reps, which I cover in point 3. Point 2 is to address a basic point of confusion I had. – Dave Liepmann Feb 27 '16 at 23:54
  • Makes sense ... thanks, for clarification. – mitro Feb 27 '16 at 23:56
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Fingertip push-ups are one option, but you'd have better luck with any number of grip exercises for forearm development:

  • Farmer's Walks

  • Deadlifting/Chin-ups

  • Gripper exercises (Captains of Crush is an example)

Also, try wrist-curls: http://www.bodybuilding.com/exercises/detail/view/name/seated-dumbbell-palms-up-wrist-curl

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If you want big forearms, get a bar or a piece of wood and hang from it as long as you can. Do sets like this. When you can do 4 sets of 1 min start adding in some wrist movements to target the area even more.

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