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Currently I run every morning before work and follow that run up with some Chin-ups, Muscle-ups and Push-ups.

I'm not trying to build muscle with these exercises but I just want to make sure I don't do more damage than good for my body. I run 6 days a week (every morning with the only exception being Saturday since I have to work the night shift).

My run is between 20 - 30 minutes followed by my 'ups' and then a semi-run/walk home. If I do this 6 days a week would this cause my muscles to actually break down instead of rebuilding themselves? I'm not concerned about these cardio exercises but I also go to the gym about 3 days a week. I mainly do core and weight exercises here.

Would this amount of exercise be considered too much?


My gym workout consists of weighted squats, bench presses, kettle swings, dips, pull-ups, and some more varieties. I would say between medium and high intensity.

  • You need to add more specifics to your question. For example, what type of gym training and intensity? As it is, you'll end up getting varied opinions. – rrirower Dec 15 '14 at 13:56
  • Added some information about my gym workout – Marco Geertsma Dec 15 '14 at 14:13
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What you’ve described is not an average training routine in my opinion. You’ve got a pretty heavy workload if you consider holding a job as well. You make no mention of the amount of weight, sets, or reps that you perform, so, I’ll assume from your description of not trying to build muscle, that those numbers are sufficiently low. Effectively, you’re asking if you run the risk of overtraining. While there are telltale signs of overtraining, you can ensure that does not happen by eating a nutritious diet and getting plenty of sleep. So, to answer your question, only you can decide if your workload is too much. Since we all handle exercise stress differently, you’ll need to make sure you monitor yourself for the signs of overtraining. And, I would suggest you take a break from training every six to eight weeks. If for nothing else, just to enjoy life and not make fitness training a “job”.

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Well, it really depends on the reason why you are training. If that's "being fit and lean and healthy" as it seems (since you don't specify any special purpose) then your routine is pretty good. I would only add some exercises for core and legs strength (running trains your endurance, not your strength) and it would be pretty complete.

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You are not going to do any 'damage' to your body or cause your muscles to breakdown. I might do the 'ups' before you run and then walk home afterwards.

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