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I was wondering, since it seemed counterproductive to me, does it make sense to take creatine while also taking a diuretic?

If creatine creates an increase in size through storing more water weight overall shouldn't it for the most part need to retain that water, and it is also highly recommended to drink a lot of water while taking creatine to stop your body from developing, I think kidney problems?.

The essence of the question is, is it counterproductive to take a diuretic, in the form of Animal Cuts, while taking creatine? Would it decrease the effects of the creatine?

  • Your question refers to supplements and not necessarily fitness. – rrirower Jan 4 '15 at 22:25
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    Oh. Didn't know the site was as specific as you are saying. Is there an exchange for supplements? – L.P. Jan 4 '15 at 23:04
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    If you re-word it in such a way as to clearly be inline with physical fitness, it can work. – Eric Jan 5 '15 at 0:31
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    I've edited the question to be in line with the scope of the site, and added an answer thats worth checking out. – user2861 Jan 5 '15 at 0:45
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Creatine has advantages beyond just water retention. While there is a marked increase in intramuscular water retention while using creatine, not all muscle mass comes from water and creatine can help increase lean muscle mass and promote muscle growth.

Additonally, creatine also increases power output and anerobic running and swimming capability , none of which relies directly on hydration(although proper is always advised during exercise).

So from a fitness perspective, taking a diuretic while taking creatine will not decrease the fitness advantages of creatine in the slightest.

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  • Thank you. I'm interested in the health points of the need for a lot of water while taking the creatine for kidney issues. I know it's a lot to ask since that's more of a medical question though. – L.P. Jan 5 '15 at 0:46
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    @L.P. You should definitely do your own research on it, but I think you'll find that there's basically zero connection to kidney problems and creatine in otherwise healthy individuals, regardless of hydration. You'll also find that most people (myself included) still tend to over-drink water just to be on the safe side. – Eric Jan 5 '15 at 0:49
  • Keep in mind your body produces creatine (not very much), and you get creatine when you eat meat. Its a very common dietary compound. – user2861 Jan 5 '15 at 0:51
  • @EricKaufman I'm currently doing a bit of research on a couple of sites. I've taken this combo before, cycling them together then one at a time after a month off, and drink upwards of a gallon and a half of water daily on a regular basis. More or less getting educated opinions on the subject for now. – L.P. Jan 5 '15 at 0:52
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    This would be a great answer if you added why creatine works. It doesn't directly add muscle mass, but it enables harder and longer workouts by providing extra fuel, which in turn enables muscle gains, and longer exercise sessions. – JohnP Jan 5 '15 at 15:13
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LiveStrong.com states that

Diuretics are drugs formulated to remove excess water from your bloodstream to ease the pressure against the walls of your veins. Creatine also redirects fluids into the muscles. Thus, when you take diuretics and creatine concurrently, you increase the potential for dehydration and kidney damage.

So that could be a concern (but they didn't really give a source).

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    This was the answer I was about to write. As a soon to be doctor, I can only agree with this. Creatine draws water into the muscles by osmotic force. Diuretics clear water from the blood firstly (extracellular), and then from muscles and other tissues (intracellular). Using diuretics at the same time as creatine is counterproductive as it will dehydrate you and thus decrease performance. Essentially, both the kidneys (diuretics) and the muscles (creatine) draw water from the blood at the same time. – Darko Sarovic Feb 14 '15 at 11:15

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