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I did crossfit for a while a few years ago, and as an influence from that my home workout today is mainly bodyweight exercises, kettlebell training and rowing. I've been training with a 16kg kettlebell for a long while, focusing on form and endurance, but I bought a 24kg and I was surprised at how my form actually improved significantly, because I couldn't simply force my way out of a bad rep. I had to do it perfectly or give up.

Is the increased risk of injury due to bad form with heavier weight worth the risk, considering the fact that I put a lot more conscious effort to focus on my form while using them?

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More often than not, if you want to work on form, you should decrease the weight. If your form breaks, it does so when the load is high.

Naturally there are exceptions to this rule, as there are to any rule, but if you've found an exercise where heavy weights force you into strict form, you've found a magical exercise. That said, make sure you know good and bad form, and that you're not simply making the assumption that the heavy weight reps were the good ones.

Is the increased risk of injury due to bad form with heavier weight worth the risk, considering the fact that I put a lot more conscious effort to focus on my form while using them?

This makes little sense, because injury is most often sustained from bad form. The reason heavy weights are associated with injuries, is because (too) heavy weights break your form.

Right now, you should probably get someone to form check you. Either in person, or by you filming some sets, and posting them for feedback.

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  • This answer is not helpful. Read more carefully. I'm not saying heavy weights force me into a better form. I'm saying heavier weights lead me into more conscious focus on my form. – Pedro Werneck Apr 10 '15 at 15:54
  • I see. I'm sorry I misunderstood the question. Well, I wouldn't change my answer very much either way. I have a hard time imagining that there exists a lower limit of weight that you need in order to be mindful of your form. Surely, you have the ability to pay attention to your form regardless of the amount of weight... – Alec Apr 10 '15 at 15:59

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