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Since I started lifting several months ago, I have noticed that my pinkies' (both of them) movement has been affected. This is more noticeable right after waking up in the morning, and consists on the following: if I close my fist and slowly open it, instead of my pinky bones opening gradually like the other fingers, it feels like they get stuck/stay flexed at the beginning and only when my whole hand is almost opened they get unstuck/unflexed very sudden and harshly.

I'm 5'7/145 and follow a FBW routine that I do 3x or 4x per week. Exercises are as follows and all performed with DB: one arm row (4x8, 50lbs), bench press (4x8, 90lbs), incline bench press (4x8, 75lbs), chest flies (3x12, 65lbs), concentration curls (3x8, 55lbs), shrugs (3x10, 55lbs), shoulder press (4x8, 65lbs), power partials (3x10, 30lbs).

If I had to guess, I would say that this is caused by the fact that I only lift heavy dumbbells (only equipment I have available) and this has put too much pressure on my wrists. Am I right, and is this a common issue?

  • What exercises are you performing? What frequency? What volume? – Eric Aug 27 '15 at 13:40
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    See edit above. I feel like the ones putting the most pressure on my wrists are the chest exercises. – Antrim Aug 27 '15 at 14:03
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"...it feels like they get stuck/stay flexed at the beginning and only when my whole hand is almost opened they get unstuck/unflexed very sudden and harshly."

What you described sounds like a case of trigger finger. It’s a pretty common overuse syndrome and may have some wrist involvement.

From the Mayo Clinic...

“People whose work or hobbies require repetitive gripping actions are at higher risk of developing trigger finger.”

It can occur to any finger on your hand. It’s the result of an inflammation of the tendon that moves the finger. When it’s inflamed, the tendon cannot move freely through the sheath that surrounds it. This typically results in the finger feeling like it “catches”. In my experience (I’ve actually had this condition), there are two recourses. Rest and/or a shot of cortisone to calm the tendon. In any event, you should consider giving the affected hand a chance to rest.

  • Maybe he can explore the wonders of leg day. – Eric Aug 27 '15 at 14:25
  • @EricKaufman That could work! – rrirower Aug 27 '15 at 14:26
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Definitely sounds like trigger finger to me. I have experienced the same in my left hand little finger.

You should see a hand specialist, and they can verify. I received a shot of cortisone to the inflamed area and it has been great since. There is also a minor operation you can have where they cut the sheath so it heals slightly larger and doesn't catch continuously on the inflamed tendon.

http://www.webmd.com/osteoarthritis/guide/trigger-finger

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