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I'm looking for an evidence-based 'how to squat' guide (and actually the gym more generally).

Free online would be great but for the gym generally I'd be happy to buy a book.

Obviously everyone's guide is based on some evidence, I'm hoping for a guide that looks at clinical data or trials (if there are any), reviews published literature etc.

To clarify, I'm wanting a guide to inform my gym activities, not for research - I'd like to know when I read things like 'don't let your knees extend beyond your toes or you'll risk damaging your knees', that these views are based on evidence like the above (if available, or whether the recommendations are just based on biomechanics first principles or whatever).

  • Generally these topics are kept separate. People write "how to squat" material and they write scientific material elsewhere. – Dave Liepmann Oct 22 '15 at 6:10
  • I have seen some stuff that is a little bit of both from Bret Contreras, e.g. strengthandconditioningresearch.com/exercises/squat – Dave Liepmann Oct 22 '15 at 6:11
  • Thanks Dave, the link looks good. I doubt it answers all my questions but it's a good start. Re your first comment: I think it would be great if someone put a bit more science, like Bret Contreras, into their 'how to squat' material. – user3591496 Oct 22 '15 at 8:17
  • Dave - do you want to put your comment in as an answer, so I can tick the questioned as answered.? Looks like it's the best that will come in. Thanks. – user3591496 Oct 23 '15 at 0:43
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Generally the topics of "how to squat" and evidence-based analyses of the squat are kept separate. People write "how to squat" material and they write scientific material elsewhere.

I have seen some stuff that is a little bit of both from Bret Contreras, for instance here. Starting Strength (and perhaps Practical Programming) by Rippetoe & Kilgore go into biomechanical detail of the squat while discussing "how to squat", as do some Olympic lifting texts. Unfortunately Rippetoe's works are extremely biased towards a specific variant (the low-bar back squat), so should be taken with a grain of salt.

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