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I've been getting in shape lately. I was kind of fat some months ago and I'm not anymore (thanks to a bit of running, a bit of sports like volleyball, and a bit of eating better). I have a decent body now, with a good BMI.

My next logical step would be to gain a bit of muscle now. The problem is, I've tried to go to gyms, but I struggle to keep my pace to keep going to them or practice my abs exercises. However I never struggle about playing sports, because they're fun. So I'm wondering if there could be a way to get ripped by playing sports? If yes, what would be the best sport to do this? Thanks!

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It all depends on your idea of ripped. Yes you can more easily lose weight doing sports but "generally" the answer to your question is no as it is not very easy to put on muscle when practicing sports due to the lack of increase in resistance each time you play.

Let's say you are playing soccer (football for Non-US). Sure you may be able to run more each time but other than increasing playing time there is nothing that is giving resistance to your muscles. They will adapt to be better at doing the certain sport or activity for longer but in terms of growth you will see little to none. Take a look at soccer players or even basketball players. Would you consider them ripped? Personally I don't but everyone has their own views.

Even if you do think they have very well developed bodies you also have to consider the fact that essentially all professional athletes spend time in the gym no matter how skinny or fat they are. This will add in some more bias as to what your body can look like purely from sports.

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  • I would somewhat argue the opposite, but as you say, it depends on your definition of ripped. Bruce Lee was not massively muscular, but I would define him as ripped. Many modern athletes (including marathoners) I would consider ripped as well, just not hugely muscular at the same time.
    – JohnP
    Jan 12 '16 at 21:21

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