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I've always wanted to incorporate daily jogs to my schedule, but at first I would get tired very quickly, out of breath, and I could feel my ankles aching so I assumed it was due to the over weight. Then when I finally committed to working out and eating right back in 2014 I did a lot of lifting but oriented towards resistance(more reps than weight) and also every Wednesday was HIIT followed by a tabata session day(which was quite the cardio workout). During that time I still tried to incorporate the jogging but 10 min is as long as I could jog without stopping. Even at my lowest weight 218 lbs(from 250 ish) and I didn't understand why if I was able to workout for even 2 hours with me ending up drenched in sweat. I thought that with my routine I would boost up my overall resistance, but running has never been my thing, I can't do it for long like I would want to.

Right now I'm 221lbs and I'm still considering incorporating jogging but I can already taste the failure. Does lifting(not heavy, just enough for me to do some effort, more focused into reps and short 30 sec breaks between sets) not help with developing a good/healthy lung capacity for jogging?

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    Not sure what you mean by "running resistance". Do you mean improving your lung capacity so that you can run for longer distances/times? Please explain further. – rrirower Feb 17 '16 at 18:17
  • If running "isn't your thing", why not find an aerobic endurance type exercise that you enjoy? Other than that, I agree with rirower, not sure what you mean by "running resistance". – JohnP Feb 17 '16 at 18:20
  • Yes, didn't know how to exactly word it @rrirower – Just Do It Feb 17 '16 at 18:22
  • Long aerobic conditioning is its own thing, and you build it up just like everything else. – Eric Feb 17 '16 at 19:31
  • So just gotta keep jogging? @EricKaufman – Just Do It Feb 17 '16 at 19:34
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Weight (resistance) training is considered anaerobic because it is typically performed in short high intensity bouts of exercise. As such, Anaerobic exercise relies on energy sources that are stored in the muscles and, unlike aerobic exercise, is not dependent on oxygen from (breathing) the air. In order for you to improve your jogging ability, you would need to improve your aerobic capacity. In your case, that would mean continuing to jog.

I recommend you continue both activities as they will provide commentary benefits.

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Running for 10 minutes straight is fine for a beginner. You can easily build on that (provided of course you had a physician check that there's nothing wrong with Your joints, bones or muscles).

Run for 8 minutes then walk for 2 to 3 minutes. No problem to walk longer if you need longer to get back your breath. Run 6 minutes. Walk again. Run 5 minutes. Go home. Stretch.

Do this 3 to 5 times a week for 2 weeks. After that do the same with running 10, 7 and 6 minutes for 2 weeks. Try to shorten the walking parts a few seconds. If it doesn't work - don't. Go on prolonging the runs every 2 weeks. Play with the rythm of running and walking. Don't overdo it. If you stick to that programme you should be able tu run about half an hour straight within three months. Good luck!

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