3

I used to run more than 10Km daily(except weekends), on a desperate attempt to develop some muscle on the thighs and calves, but 7months ago I stopped jogging. Of course doing daily runs didn't help, and instead I lost a lot more weight.

The fact is now I started jogging again, but I also want to gain weight and build muscle. So my question is:

Knowing that I am an ectomorph, can jogging at most twice a week(10 - 15Km) cause a negative effect If I am following a strict gym program/routine, even if I have a strict diet and sleep for the minimum required amount of time?

Jogging became a habit for me, so now it will be very hard to just completely stop(if I have to).

Note that this is the first time in my life that I am planning to join a gym and I don't remember ever weighting more than 63Kg my average weigh has mostly been 50-60Kg.

  • 6
    You're not an ectomorph; somatotypes have been disproved. If you're eating enough, then the running shouldn't have a negative effect on gaining weight, assuming you're also allowing for recovery. You'll probably have an easier time if you don't keep a strict diet, especially if you already find it hard to put on weight. – Alex L Mar 14 '16 at 0:31
2

You want two things at the same time, which is good, but you have to put them in the right order.

You can run on the same day you workout at the gym ( I'm assuming with weights ), but just do them in this order: jog and then resistance training.

The motivation is one actually, and I've already gave an answer in this question.

Do not bother about somatotype. The main misunderstanding of this concept by William Sheldon is that this has nothing to do, mostly, with fitness in general, but was a theory set to predict criminal behaviour ( psychology ).

So remember, it's the order and the magnitude that matter.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.