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I am a beginner looking for advice on how to practice for a 5k run.

For some background, I finished my last 5k in 35 minutes because I ran out of breath easily. I played basketball (for fun) and work out 2x a week, but since that 5k I realized how bad my stamina is. My goal is to be able to run a 5k within 20-25 minutes for starter. I have been jogging once a week: 2.5k jogging, then having a short rest, then doing another 2.5k jogging. This routine has been continued for about 3 months, but I do not feel my stamina or endurance improved a little bit - even my heel and ankle ached a bit during each practice. Do I need to run more often, like 2-3x a week? I assume the pain will go away once I do practice more often?

If anyone has a training plan that works for him/her, please kindly share it here. Also, when would be appropriate to expect an improvement? Thanks in advance!

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  • what is your heart rate over the course of a run?
    – Anatoly
    Oct 17 '16 at 20:30
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Stamina gets built over time, and that time varies for everyone. Jogging and running are 2 different things. All you need to do is break down your goals and achieve it in fragments. Start with a 1k run, and try finish it in 6 minutes and do it below 5. go for 2 k and try doing it below 10. Likewise, build up till you do that 5 in 25 and then work on reducing time further. Let your body get used to something first and then move on to next level. Now it seems like you are in a course of breaking it. Don't do that. Take a slow and gradual approach and east healthy. Practice jumping ropes and do some leg exercises like raises, lunges etc to strengthen your leg muscles. Best wishes.

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The same way you would have built up your first 5k jog, using intervals.

'Jogging' would be your 5k-in-35-min pace

'Running' would be your 5k-in-20-min pace

Start with a 4min jog, 1min run, 4min jog, 1 min run...etc. (repeat until you complete the 5k)

Once that is comfortable then increase the run time by 1 minute and/or decrease the jog time by 1 minute. Repeat until you can do the whole thing at a 'run'.

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