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I can easily do pistol squats on my right leg, but I am not able to do the same on my left leg. Why is there this kind of strength imbalance and how can I correct the imbalance? I never trained my right leg separately i had always trained them equally (trained them with same no. of reps).. Does this mean my form has been defective?

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The simple answer to your first question is that your left leg probably isn't as strong. For how to correct the imbalance, your best bet is to start training that left leg. Since you cannot currently do a pistol squat with that leg, do progressions. If you can lower yourself into the pistol squat position, do it as a negative, trying to go down as slowly as possible. If that's still too difficult (and I'd advise not pushing too hard because you don't want to lose control and have your bodyweight take your knee or ankle in the wrong direction), reduce the effective weight and improve your balance by holding onto something while lowering and raising yourself. As you get better, you rely less and less on the surface you're clinging to until you can do the movement on your own.

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  • Do you suggest to train just the weaker leg until i can do full movement? Would it not cause a same kind of imbalance on other leg? Thanks
    – Kael
    Nov 7, 2016 at 8:49
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    You could train them both in the same way,lowering some reps on your right leg while raising some reps on your left leg ,but do the same amount on both until they get equally strong. Nov 7, 2016 at 10:09
  • As stated by John, yes, do the exercises on both legs. Because building muscle (and exercise fitness in general) is the result of your body reacting to adversity, if both sides are isolated, your weak side will likely grow stronger faster until it catches up with the strong side.
    – Sean Duggan
    Nov 7, 2016 at 14:11

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