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I had lots of injury in gym and I kept hearing it is because of bad form. I am sure i was doing correct form in half of them. Does proper form never cause injury?

  • Short answer: Correct form will reduce the chances of injury. If you have had lots of injuries then definitely correct form will help reduce lots of injuries to very few ones. – PravinCG Jul 14 '17 at 11:42
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It's not that black and white.

Yes you can still get injuries using proper form because injuries are related to more factors than just form, but you can reduce the risk of getting an injury by using proper form on during an exercise.

It also has to do with how often you use proper or bad form. If you work out for years and years and u constantly use bad for you will almost guaranteed get an injury, while if you only use bad form once it might not have as big of an impact.

To sum it up: Using proper form will greatly reduce your changes of getting an injury, but you cannot prevent injuries with 100% certainty just by using proper form.

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    There's no evidence that stretching before exercise is important, and a lot of evidence that it results in decreased performance and increased injury. – Eric Jul 14 '17 at 16:22
  • As backwards as @EricKaufman comments may seem -- they aren't. I agree and have also seen the research supporting this. – Mike-DHSc Jul 14 '17 at 18:33
  • @EricKaufman depends on type of stretching. I have seen the studies showing decreased performance from static stretching, do you have links for the injury claim? – JohnP Jul 16 '17 at 13:11
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For me, form is everything when it comes to preventing injury. "Men's Health's Big Book of Exercise" is my go-to for clear, quickly understandable directions on proper form. It also has detailed workouts. The Kindle version is super cheap and you can access it on your phone, while at the gym. Edit: I should add that physical therapy has helped teach me how to strengthen critical muscles and prevent injury. For example, I had lots of shoulder problems until a physical therapist taught me how to target specific muscles with simple, very low-weight exercises. This also helped with my knee and shoulder.

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