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i know a man that facing problems with his ears when he diving on sea(after 4 meters deep).He has pain a lot in ears.Its weird,isnt it?. Its not only in sea diving but also in aeroplane.Facing exactly the same pain in both cases.He thinks he caused by streptomycin.He has a long time ago (when he was young)an ill bronchitis and he use streptomycin for to be well.Nowdays he check his ears and he found that the respond curve stops at 7KHz .Did streptomycin cause this or something else?What cause those pain in diving?

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  • This seems to be pretty common and definitely not weird. It happens This usually happens due to difference in pressure inside and outside and he basically needs to learn the process of equalization to feel better.
    – PravinCG
    Jul 20 '17 at 9:56
  • PravinCG - No that is absolutely incorrect. This is abnormal @e.l can you please reword this to make it vague as possible or it will be closed (not be me) for "seeking medical advice". I literally just saw a pt with this last week. I'll post when I can shortly.
    – Mike-DHSc
    Jul 20 '17 at 10:01
  • Its not seeking medical advice.I was curious why someone has problem like this and i think was because the deep,but because he told me about that streptomicyn may be the problem, thats why i added and this and as i see i did good .if it was his ears or the "drug" .I personal ,seeing this answer down i impressed i didnt expected this happen i beleived (i was thinking )it was something else.
    – e.l
    Jul 20 '17 at 13:12
  • @Mike-DHSc - Since that is a normal reaction to pressure differences, and people flying and diving under water are taught to equalize pressure (scubadiving.com/11-tips-easy-equalizing), I'm not sure why you claim his answer is "absolutely incorrect." While it may also be caused by the factors in your answer, this reads like a very simple case of air pressure differential, as well, so I'm not sure either can be ruled out, out of hand. Jul 20 '17 at 16:04
  • @PoloHoleSet pain scuba diving or while flying is NOT a normal response. Neither is having no response at only 7KHz. The vestibular system is heavily involved in both. The links below explain it.
    – Mike-DHSc
    Jul 20 '17 at 16:24
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Based on your implication, he should have serious problem even while sitting in car or any moving vehicle? Is that understanding correct for this diagnosis?

Great question. No not necessary.

Symptoms of a vestibular or balance function loss depend upon the degree of damage, if the damage occurred rapidly or slowly, if it’s one-sided or two-sided, and how long ago the damage occurred.

A slow one-sided loss might not produce any symptoms. While a rapid loss could produce enough vertigo, vomiting, and nystagmus (eye jerking), to keep a person in bed for days.

Most of the time, the symptoms slowly pass, allowing a person to return to normal activities.

Ototoxicity can be temporary or permanent.

Symptoms range from mild imbalance to total incapacitation.

Two areas can be damaged or destroyed through ototoxicity: the hair cells within the inner ear, and the vestibulocochlear nerve that links the inner ear to the brain.

When damage occurs, any degree and combination of hearing loss and balance disruption are possible depending upon the part(s) affected.

Hair cells are located in both the cochlea and the vestibular areas of the inner ear (there are millions of these). They are composed of a cell body with a hair-like attachment. When these “hairs” are normally bent with sound vibrations or movement, they send electrical signals to the brain about hearing or balance function. In ototoxicity, these hairs can be damaged to the point that they no longer stand up, thus reducing the auditory and/or balance signals sent to the brain.


Figured he's already been diagnosed. It's due to the hydrostatic (water) pressure and pressure changes that occur when flying. Really simply put he has some genetic based reaction to streptomycin – it’s pretty rare.

For some reason it damaged part of his inner ear (a part called the “hair cells” of your ear) and nerve.

In the second picture, you can see “hair cells” – when they work correctly they bend sending signals to your brain in response to movement and sound. Unfortunately his don't.

Send him that page -- it has everything about it.
http://vestibular.org/understanding-vestibular-disorder/types-vestibular-disorders

Also reading your second answer not sure if he saw a doctor or not but the toxic effects of the drug will keep making things worse until he see's his doctor.


The condition described below is directly related to certain drugs including streptomycin and present nearly identically to what you've described. However other conditions cannot be ruled out. Again please get this examined right away.


What Is Ototoxicity?

OTO = EAR; TOXICITY = POISONING

Ototoxicity put simply is ear poisoning, which results from exposure to drugs or chemicals that damage the inner ear or nerve. As the inner ear is involved in both hearing and balance, ototoxicity can result in disturbances of either or both of these senses.

With cochleotoxicity, hearing loss or the start or worsening of tinnitus (ringing in the ears) can occur through damage to the cochlea (the hearing apparatus) or the cochlear branch of the vestibulocochlear nerve.

![enter image description here

What Substances Can Cause Ototoxicity?

Problems with a particular drug are usually only discovered after enough people have suffered the consequences and when physicians or other health care professionals can see a probable connection between the symptoms or problems and a drug.

This was the case with aspirin and quinine centuries ago,

With the antibiotic streptomycin Since then, scientific studies have shown that these drugs cause ototoxicity in animals and people.

Note: if you are taking drugs on the advice of your physician, DO NOT STOP TAKING THEM just because you see them listed here! Speak with your doctor about your concerns to determine the best choice in your own unique situation.

What Damage Occurs?

Two areas can be damaged or destroyed through ototoxicity: the hair cells within the inner ear, and the vestibulocochlear nerve that links the inner ear to the brain. When damage occurs, any degree and combination of hearing loss and balance disruption are possible depending upon the part(s) affected.

enter image description here

Hair cells are located in both the cochlea and the vestibular areas of the inner ear. They are composed of a cell body with a hair-like attachment. When these "hairs" are normally bent with sound vibrations or movement, they send electrical signals to the brain about hearing or balance function. In ototoxicity, these hairs can be damaged to the point that they no longer stand up, thus reducing the auditory and/or balance signals sent to the brain.

What Are The Symptoms?

  1. Cochleotoxicity symptoms range from mild tinnitus to total hearing loss, depending upon each person and the form and level of exposure to the ototoxin. They can include one-sided or two-sided hearing loss and constant or fluctuating tinnitus.

  1. Vestibulotoxicity symptoms range from mild imbalance to total incapacitation. Symptoms of a vestibular or balance function loss depend upon the degree of damage, if the damage occurred rapidly or slowly, if it's one-sided or two-sided, and how long ago the damage occurred. A slow one-sided loss might not produce any symptoms, while a rapid loss could produce enough vertigo, vomiting, and nystagmus (eye jerking), to keep a person in bed for days. Most of the time, the symptoms slowly pass, allowing a person to return to normal activities.

  1. A two-sided loss in vestibulotoxicity typically causes headache, a feeling of ear fullness, imbalance to the point of being unable to walk, and a bouncing and blurring of vision rather than intense vertigo, vomiting, and nystagmus. It also tends to produce inability to tolerate head movement, a wide-based gait (walking with the legs farther apart than usual), difficulty walking in the dark, unsteadiness or the sensation of unsteadiness, lightheadedness, and significant fatigue. If the damage is severe, symptoms such as oscillopsia and problems with walking in the dark or with the eyes closed will not diminish with time.

http://vestibular.org/ototoxicity
http://vestibular.org/understanding-vestibular-disorder/types-vestibular-disorders
http://vestibular.org/diagnosis-treatment
http://www.medicinenet.com/balance_disorders_pictures_slideshow/article.htm
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3987789/

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  • Thanks very much.I am greatful for telling him to see the doctor.I didnt beleive really that was the problem. Really weird seems to me but yes.Again thanks your answer is very very good and understanable.
    – e.l
    Jul 20 '17 at 13:15
  • "In the second picture, you can see “hair cells” – when they work correctly they bend sending signals to your brain in response to movement and sound. Unfortunately his don't." Based on your implication, he should have serious problem even while sitting in car or any moving vehicle? Is that understanding correct for this diagnosis?
    – PravinCG
    Jul 21 '17 at 11:48
  • @PravinGC Added to top of my Answer
    – Mike-DHSc
    Jul 21 '17 at 13:31

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