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I have been reading several threads and seems to be very confusing about overweight people who are trying to get back in shape (reducing weight+loosing fat+building muscles). Looks a lot to get all the three things at once but I am sure it can be achieved. Some says "Light weight and more reps to loose weight", some advice to "Lift heavy and less reps for loosing weight","Mix resistance and cardio for weight loss". They seems to be missing technical details. What is the best(or better) from all of these, apart from a proper diet, healthy lifestyle and regular exercise.?

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IMO it's addressing weak points and I'd lean towards strength training over hypertrophy (perhaps if only because it can be more psychologically rewarding seeing those beginner PRs improve rapidly) and maybe even some explosive training and high-intensity cardio and maybe even calisthenics (could include gymnastics). Besides that, at least a lot of natties seem to make more rapid gains adopting a considerable strength component to their training instead of focusing exclusively on hypertrophy.

I really think people focus too much on how many calories they burn doing a particular physical activity. The way I see it is that you start gradually raising your long-term energy expenditure by just becoming a more active, strong, energetic individual even when you aren't training.

And addressing weak points can do that. It might make the difference between taking the elevator just to get to the second floor when you're late for work to having the strength, coordination, and energy to fly up the stairs to the top floor just because you feel like it. It might make the difference between choosing the path of least resistance to push something heavy around versus deadlifting it and happily carrying it around. It might make the difference between just sitting on the grass or wanting to do cartwheels.

So I see it like that. Find a way to boost your energy expenditure not just through training, but throughout your entire day. I even think skill-oriented training like learning how to do a handstand can help since that can make it more fun to practice those skills all the time throughout the day.

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Endurance training is best to lose weight. I would mix cardio with higher rep workouts.

The cardio is where you will burn most of the calories to lose weight, with the high rep exercises giving you more muscle tone. I would aim for 8-12 reps per set.

Most important is a good healthy diet. I know some people that have lost 15-20 lbs just from cutting pop out of their diet!

  • Would this endurance help in getting muscles definition or in other words would it give a nice definition to my muscles? For example, Arms, and shoulders muscles? – Ankit Sharma Dec 21 '17 at 14:04
  • Yes it will definitely help. Muscle definition won't show without lowering bodyfat %. HIT is probably best to burn calories, but starting with regular cardio is good too. – LBJ33 Dec 21 '17 at 14:20
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For weight loss - diet gives much better result then training.

In this matter - exercises have two kinds of benefits:

  • they speed your metabolism, so your body tends to use more energy,
  • directly burns energy.

For first heavy weight is OK. High weight triggers more testosterone - for instance. Bigger white-fiber muscles needs more energy during the day.

To burn more - many, many reps with high intensity goes better. Like running, rowing.

Note that there are potential problems with both of ways. Your weight can bring much higher effort to your body. For instance - your knees can get injured. Heavy weight, if done wrongly... can be also a problem. If your body is warmed they you can miss signals your body is sending.

So what is better? I would do both. Use light weight for warm-up - at start of training some walking/running or interval of both. Then before main set, you can do warm-up set lighter, more reps, and after that go with higher weights in main exercise. Usually people do one, two complex exercises + support them with accessory training. Accessory means here - isolated, targeting particular muscle. For them, if you have short rests no warm-up is needed. At the end you can run/walk on treadmill for 30+ min. find out proper heart rate and stick to it for that time. Not always more is better...

  • Thats quite right,but in this process do I burn more fat also, as the weight loss could come to a threshold, the thing is I want to look leaner not thing or weak. – Ankit Sharma Dec 21 '17 at 15:01
  • I like weight. So my answers here are based. Also I like to exercise in different ways. For me that is a lot between two options you presented. Question is about your BMI - if that is around 30, or you have problems with knees - then, perhaps running is not a good choice. I would do weight training + some exercises with constant heart bit - for faster fat lose. I have a gym-friend who do 1000calories each training. 3-4 machines, and that works for him. – Michał Zaborowski Dec 21 '17 at 15:49
  • There are many options. Hard to tell what can work in your case. Try them, talk with people, find trainer. That way you can get better informed. I know that at start that is a bit messy. And you want simple rules - do this, do not do that. Personal trainer helps here. However I like to build up my own knowledge - takes time, but... that is my way. – Michał Zaborowski Dec 21 '17 at 15:57
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Assuming that you might be relatively new to the game, if you do body building workouts you will be doing enough reps (12) at a light enough weight to not get hurt, and you will see some noticeable hypertrophy. After a few months of that, you can start doing higher intensity low rep (3 to 5) workouts with good form, and survive it. As far as weight loss and muscle definition, its just a matter of percentage of body fat. For what its worth, I recommend you to be patient. You burn off more fat by just 'digesting food and thinking' than by your, maybe, 600 Calorie workout (even counting the "after burn"), so eat wisely, hydrate, and get lots of sleep, and you will lose weight. Some people store more peripheral sub-cutaneous fat in their limbs than others, and so the muscle cut might be harder to come by.

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Assuming that you (or other visitors here) might be relatively new to the game, if you do body building workouts you will be doing enough reps (12) at a light enough weight to not get hurt, and you will see some noticeable hypertrophy. After a few months of that, you can start doing higher intensity low rep (3 to 5) workouts with good form, and survive it. As far as weight loss and muscle definition, its just a matter of percentage of body fat. For what its worth, I recommend you to be patient. You burn off more fat by just 'digesting food and thinking' than by your, maybe, 600 Calorie workout (even counting the "after burn"), so eat wisely, hydrate, and get lots of sleep, and you will lose weight. Some people store more peripheral sub-cutaneous fat in their limbs than others, and so the muscle cut might be harder to come by. Lipolysis (fat mobilization) occurs in moderate intensity exercise as per https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jobe/2015/473430/ The jury is still out as how that mobilization of fat gets involved in exercise fat burning, or post exercise fat storage. I'm convinced that body building resistance training will utilize intramuscular fat that, in turn, gets replaced by some of the fatty acids in the blood that are mobilized during the workout (unless you spike your insulin with carbs before the workout). There are a million journal articles that present the spectrum of "how to lose fat" recommendations via exercise or by diet, so I hesitate to start an avalanche of competing citations here.

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1 - Congrats on your decision to get healthy.

2 - The great news your just getting started so essentially anyway you slice it you'll lose weight and put on muscle.

The specialized programs are what you'll work up to and nothing you need to concern yourself now.


For the Most Efficient Results

  • I would do circuit training using just a standard 3x10 with 60-90 seconds per rest. I had a friend win his "weight loss" office pool doing literally this workout.
  • Get accustomed to the machines, early on -- focus on intensity and depending on how big your gym is do all the machines on a M, W, F schedule.
  • I know it seems strange but as long as your workouts are intense you only need to like for 20-30 min.
  • I'd skip "pure" cardio (unless you want to come in on a Sat or Sun).

Your goal now is to get your feet wet, it's a common to want to do too much and that leads to only one road - please don't fall into that trap.

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