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I have read lots of articles but its hard to find an optimal answer for this question: Fullbody workouts or Body part splits for better results. Goal is to get that single digit body fat %. I have a desk job so I could go for 3-4 days and I got some advices that I should start with the full body for strength(feel good) and then go for specific parts for hypertrophy(look good).

  • Have you started already? You've been planning to start for at least a month now. Do you enjoy what you are doing? If so, why switch it up already? If not, try the other alternative – Raditz_35 Jan 16 '18 at 10:26
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    I have been doing since last 3+ months the split body part, i wanted to make sure before switching to other alternatives. – Ankit Sharma Jan 16 '18 at 10:41
  • Passed by but decided to add my 2 cents. As an example my first "attempt" to get fit - been going to the gym 2012 - 2014, doing split. And second one is still ongoing - 2016 Jan - now. fullbody most of the time. And if I compare my "split"-way with "fullbody"-way, I can say that second one went much better, more strenght gained and at least my abs are visible now. (My start strenght & look on every "attempt" was approximatley the same) – Danil Gholtsman Jan 19 '18 at 10:17
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I have read lots of articles but its hard to find an optimal answer for this question

It's hard to find an optimal answer, because it's no an optimal question. There is no clear cut right-or-wrong answer to this question, because the effect of a full-body workout, or a split workout, depends entirely on you, your body, your discipline, your habits, your diet, your sleeping patterns, and the list goes on.

Goal is to get that single digit body fat %.

That's not really something that happens in a gym. This happens in the kitchen. No matter how good your workout is, or how often you do it, you will never drop your bodyfat percentage if you don't get your diet in order.

How you work out will only help to make sure your body transitions well. It will have virtually no effect on your bodyfat.

I have a desk job so I could go for 3-4 days

If you're a complete beginner, I'd recommend 2-3 days to start with. And a full body workout is fine. Do the big compound lifts, rest for 1-2 days, and come back to it.

If you do a full body workout for 4 days per week, you may start to feel perpetually fatigued after a month or two. Especially if you're going to take bodyfat and dietting seriously.

I got some advices that I should start with the full body for strength(feel good) and then go for specific parts for hypertrophy(look good)

For most people, it will take at least a year before you see any real progress. Working out is something we do for the benefit of our distant future selves. It's not like you're going to start working out, and in 2 months, you have a chiseled physique. If it were easy and/or quick, everyone would have it.

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    +1 - Great answer, couldn't agree more. Discipline is everything. It’s easy to get lost in the details. Willpower is the “muscle” I always recommend starting with (and it's developed the same way a muscle is). Great book on it here: barnesandnoble.com/w/… The Willpower Instinct How Self-Control Works, Why It Matters, and What You Can Do to Get More of It. Good luck! – Mike-DHSc Jan 16 '18 at 14:03
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There are general rules that works for all of us. For instance if you spend more calories then you take - weight will go down. I know that is not the most expected answer, but diet gives best results if you wish to loose weight.

Loosing weight is a bit tricky. Usually one would like to loose fat, not muscles. Without training, muscles will get smaller. Body is opportunistic - if muscles are not needed, and they cost energy - answer is easy. At least from that perspective. So even if diet is key here, training is highly needed.

If you ask this question, I expect you are training for not too long, or even starting. In that case, I would use fullbody training. First - schedule is not that tight. Skipping particular day does not ruin Full body training means lower weight, so less chance of serious injury. Still you need to do things right, but crossfit shows that some people can deal without it.

I would even start with body weight exercises, core, stabilization. Later I would include some stretching to be sure that you are not loosing motion range during exercises. At least that is what personal trainers do with their clients at my gym.

Split workout brings high weights, or at least high load. That is also good. Squat, deadlift with high weights gives your testosterone boost. But that requires technique. That is long run, plan your training in years, and have it as a habit, with some milestones, not just 2-6 months shoot - to have better shape during summer, or something like that.

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