1

I don't understand how do you move your hips out of socket:

https://youtu.be/CaFou7EqRrw?t=3m34s

She's saying she's:

  1. Moving the hip socket forward
  2. Moves the leg up and down
  3. Moves the hip back

How can you move the hips up or back from their socket? I tried and I ended up wiggling. lol

7

She doesn't know what she's talking about.

The hips do not interface with any socket, rather they each contain a socket, so it makes no sense to try to describe the hips as moving relative to their own sockets. Furthermore, the femurs do not move out of the hip sockets except in the case of hip dislocation, which is a serious injury usually only occurring in cases of major trauma. So you should just forget everything she says about hip sockets.

The movement she is demonstrating in that video is actually lower back rotation combined with a little bit of hip adduction and abduction in order to keep the thighs parallel to the floor. This is basically just wiggling your butt.

Breaking the movement down into segments:

  1. The lower back is rotated with the upper body fixed and the lower body moving, such that the right hip moves forward, with the left leg remaining on the ground (resulting in a slight hip adduction in that leg) and the right leg remaining held parallel to the floor (resulting in a slight hip abduction in that leg).
  2. The right hip is further abducted, causing the right knee to raise so that the right thigh is no longer parallel to the floor.
  3. The right hip is adducted, lowering the right knee back down until the thigh is parallel to the floor.
  4. The lower back is rotated back the other way, so that the right hip moves back until it is above the left hip. Again, slight hip adduction and abduction keep the thighs parallel to the floor.

I'll also note that there is no evidence that any kind of "gluteal amnesia" or "lazy glute syndrome" actually exists, and so as a rule, you should probably just ignore anyone who prescribes "glute activation" exercises. If you are capable of standing up, then your glutes are activating just fine. If they weren't then you'd fall down.

It's possible that she does derive some benefit from these exercises, either because, as indicated as the start of the video, she has a hip labrum tear and these exercises just act as a warmup which provides some relief, or just because she's conditioned herself into a placebo/nocebo effect where if she doesn't do these exercises, it throws her off mentally. But don't go thinking that you need to do these yourself.

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