In my quest to live forever and look splendid, I have with great interest read about the human growth hormone HGH. The body's HGH levels naturally decrease with age. Some speculate that increasing HGH could reverse age-related bodily deterioration. In the US medical doctor Jeffry Life is promoting using synthetic HGH, and appearently it is popular in Hollywood because of its reported ability to add thickness and elasticity to skin. Sylvester Stallone has even been convicted of importing it into Australia.

I do not think taking synthetic hormones is any wise in the long term. However triggering the bodys ability to produce it itself sounds like a good idea. From what I read weight training does this. In particular slow hypertrophy training: T-nation: Tip: Increase Growth Hormone by 1700%. However this is the sort of training that break down the muscles the most. So it only seems logical that the body responds by producing the most HGH to repair the muscles.

Repaired and more powerful muscles is great, but I also would like to have the soft skin of a baby. For this to happen the amount of HGH produced by the body probably must exceed what is needed to repair the muscles or does the skin "grab" HGH at the same time as the muscles?

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    i think main problem with your Q is that "look young" is subjective – aaaaaa Jul 24 at 18:50
  • @a: I suspect you understand my question. For your benefit I could rephrase it as "Does strength training make your skin more elastic?" – Andy Jul 24 at 18:57
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    Mmm...I would suspect that maintaining muscle mass and thus avoiding some of the inevitable skin droop due to aging is more of a factor than anything. – JohnP Jul 24 at 18:59
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    i think it is important to specify outcome precisely. Then you can go and search scholar.google.com for papers, for example. Otherwise there is no way of knowing what is true and what is not. To my taste, bodybuilders look like skin cancer – aaaaaa Jul 24 at 19:10
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    In the case of skin, sun damage plays a really big role in looking older. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3790843 – DeeV Jul 24 at 19:12

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