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I have googled for a few weeks and didn't find an answer. Can you Workout, and then eat nothing for 16 hours without reducing hypertrophy or anything else?

  • What matters for muscle growth is total weekly kilocalories intake not daily kilocalories eaten. 16 hours of fast are not enough to make you lose any type of weight be it fat or muscle.... the digestive system takes between 42 to 72 hours to completely process and eliminate the food you ate, therefore you are still digesting the food you ate 2 or 3 days ago. The human body has evolved for millennia in order to being able to survive without food for months. If you see that your muscles get smaller when you don't eat is because muscles are also used to store sugar and water inside. – user29791 Nov 1 '18 at 15:18
  • I am just worried when I read:"You don't need a post shake, but you should eat after your workout blabla." – Stjema Nov 1 '18 at 15:32
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There was at least one study: Intermittent fasting combined with resistance training: effects on body composition, muscular performance, and dietary intake

Among their conclusions (all emphasis mine):

In the absence of any other dietary guidance, restricting caloric consumption to a 4-hour window on 4 days per week was not sufficient to elicit body composition improvements in 8 weeks, although lean mass was maintained in both groups. This form of IF was sufficient to reduce caloric intake on fasting days, but this did not translate to body fat reductions in many subjects. Untrained young men experience similar strength adaptations whether they eat normally or perform this form of IF.

To clarify, the last sentence indicates that IF had no effect on "reducing hypertrophy or anything else".

  • Did you even try to understand what I wrote?... It's nothing about fat reduction or maintaining muscles mass. What effects do 16 hours fasting after workout have? – Stjema Nov 1 '18 at 14:30
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    @Stjerna - Drop the attitude. If you want to clarify the question, do so by editing it. With this comment, you're just changing the scope from effects on hypertrophy, to any effect at all, which pretty much muddies the question rather than clarify it. – Alec Nov 1 '18 at 15:14

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